Art expression – Utopic Studios http://utopicstudios.com/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 02:47:51 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://utopicstudios.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-3-120x120.png Art expression – Utopic Studios http://utopicstudios.com/ 32 32 Why it’s time to finally dye your hair this fantastic color, according to pro Daniel Moon https://utopicstudios.com/why-its-time-to-finally-dye-your-hair-this-fantastic-color-according-to-pro-daniel-moon/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 00:48:22 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/why-its-time-to-finally-dye-your-hair-this-fantastic-color-according-to-pro-daniel-moon/ The desire for more vibrancy in our lives amid the gloom and the culture’s continuing shift towards more individual self-expression has made this an exciting time for fantastic hair color. And there’s no doubt that Moon, both on Instagram and with her latest red carpet work, continues to be at the forefront of emerging trends. […]]]>

The desire for more vibrancy in our lives amid the gloom and the culture’s continuing shift towards more individual self-expression has made this an exciting time for fantastic hair color. And there’s no doubt that Moon, both on Instagram and with her latest red carpet work, continues to be at the forefront of emerging trends. Take his collaborations with Kristen Stewart, who he recently made a 70s-inspired rose gold blonde (a cross between David Bowie and Paris, Texas Nastassja Kinski) for her Spencer press tour, or longtime client Kid Cudi, whose non-sexist attitude to beauty has broken boundaries left and right. “He’s conceptual, he’s constantly evolving, and it’s super exciting to work with him because the way he dresses in the colors he thinks about, it’s like, ‘What is he going on? do next? ‘, ”Moon said. It is no coincidence that more and more men are entering the field of chromatic hair. “For a year and a half, maybe two years, men have really intensified [their hair color], Like let’s be bright, let’s be stronger, explains Moon. “Things get smoother between the genders and loosen up a bit where people are more open to expressing themselves.” For more proof, look no further than Gen Z, the generation with the most glowing hair of them all. “My nephew was seven when I started coloring his hair and he still colors it now,” says Moon. “Now people will grow up like this. This is the future, we are the future.

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Moon’s living room, as well as its product line, from its Major Moonshine multi-use glitter gel to its line of brightly colored Major aprons, are part of its mission to encourage self-expression. “We all have our own idea of ​​what color is and what it has been in the past and how it makes people feel,” says Moon. “But now people are starting to understand that this is really a positive force and that they can open them up to a new version of themselves; who they were always meant to be.

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The colorful world of old sayings https://utopicstudios.com/the-colorful-world-of-old-sayings/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/the-colorful-world-of-old-sayings/ OPINION: I was trying to explain to a puzzled youngster the meaning of the phrase “drop someone’s block”. Her neighbor, who is obviously a nice old duck and wouldn’t hurt a fly, continues to use it, and she wanted to know what that meant. The block, I explained, was a head or “swede” like in […]]]>

OPINION: I was trying to explain to a puzzled youngster the meaning of the phrase “drop someone’s block”.

Her neighbor, who is obviously a nice old duck and wouldn’t hurt a fly, continues to use it, and she wanted to know what that meant.

The block, I explained, was a head or “swede” like in a root vegetable, and dropping a block probably comes from a boxing term, like knocking someone out.

Most likely, the term could well have come from the time of Henry VIII and the king’s penchant for bringing down the blocks of his hapless wives.

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Moving on to the art form of cubism, because I know my friend loves art, I said that a head depicted as a block shape is written roughly in cubism where works of art and humans are represented in cubes.

Warming up on the theme, I took it a step further and brought up another boring term, namely the phrase “swinging” for someone, like waving your arm like a “rock maker.” hay ”(another boxing term) swinging their arm in the general direction of the person they wish to approach. Not that we wanted to assault anyone, I added hastily.

This expression led me to another colorful saying – the very popular threat to “tan a hide” when I was at knee height in front of a grasshopper and mom had a strap permanently lodged behind the bathroom mirror to help. to shape his recalcitrant offspring.

Another colorful expression is

Richard Heathcote / Getty Images

Another colorful expression is “swinging” for someone, like waving their arm like a “haymaker” (another boxing term) swinging their arm in the general direction of the person they want. tackle, writes Jane Bowron.

Don’t worry i won’t do one Angela’s Ashes and indulging in revelations of a difficult childhood full of deprivation and intergenerational dusting, but I remember having the audacity to ask in the midst of a relentless pursuit, what tanning a hide really meant. It took her sails breathless as I tried to chock before the leather slammed on my legs. By then, I had already understood the basics.

This is what I miss in the old sayings, which get you the gist of it because they are so colorful. Conversations used to trill with them long before the arrival of the boring old emoji to help express what cannot be conveyed in the limited subgenre of the text.

One of my favorite expressions, which regularly came out of my grandfather’s mouth or his “cake hole”, was dismissive “I wouldn’t spit on him for practice”. This choice line was usually followed by the scathing criticism that came with the delayed punchline – “There’s nothing wrong with him … a good undertaker doesn’t fix”.

Jane Bowron: “The block, I explained, was a head or 'swede' like in a root vegetable, and dropping a block probably comes from a boxing term, like knocking someone out.

Kevin’s Stent / Stuff

Jane Bowron: “The block, I explained, was a head or ‘swede’ like in a root vegetable, and dropping a block probably comes from a boxing term, like knocking someone out. “

As a grandfather would have said, spitting on someone for an army spinoff practice where you spat on another soldier’s food in a vulgar take-over bid to acquire their tucker.

Then there was the spinning stomach, because it reminds me of Rembrandt’s painting showing an anatomy lesson. Threat “I’ll have your guts for the garters.” It made me thankful that my socks were held up with old boring gray regulation elastic bands rather than bloody red gut guts.

Best to end on a positive line with my favorite saying, which is to compliment someone that their “blood is worth bottling”.

In a somewhat vampiric tone, the saying could be taken the wrong way and interpreted as a threat to, against a person’s will, open their veins and empty them of their vital mess. But it also casts the healthy image of the triumph of bottling the old-fashioned Agee jars, all sealed and proudly lined up on the pantry shelf chock full of homemade tomato soup. Yum yum.


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Encinitas artist draws inspiration from nature in metalwork and design https://utopicstudios.com/encinitas-artist-draws-inspiration-from-nature-in-metalwork-and-design/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 14:00:13 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/encinitas-artist-draws-inspiration-from-nature-in-metalwork-and-design/ Artist Taylor Morgan and her team used the topography of Mission Trails Regional Park as inspiration for one of the custom pieces they created as part of a public art collection in Northern city, the mixed-use development of downtown San Marcos. Sculptures and murals at the 200-acre site include a recycled junk art sculpture and […]]]>

Artist Taylor Morgan and her team used the topography of Mission Trails Regional Park as inspiration for one of the custom pieces they created as part of a public art collection in Northern city, the mixed-use development of downtown San Marcos. Sculptures and murals at the 200-acre site include a recycled junk art sculpture and 100-foot mural, as well as Morgan’s personalized “Prominence Desk” at the Mesa Rim Climbing Center.

“We started designing the project before the pandemic, and like most of our projects once COVID-19 hit, there were several delays and pauses in the actual construction process. There was a point where we categorized all of our designs and moved on to other projects. I believe a year and a half had passed when we were called to ask if we were still interested in the project, ”he says of the cut-sheet steel desk with two local 20-year-old Douglas firs. feet on 3 feet. slabs.

“The scope, schedule and budget had changed, but we knew we had to do whatever we could to produce the parts that we had already put so much thought and effort into, so we rose to the challenge of finishing. this piece in 45 days. It took many long nights, but miraculously… the pieces came together wonderfully.

Morgan, 27, is the owner and operator of Taylor H. Morgan Designs, his design and manufacturing company specializing in metalwork, public art, interior design, furniture and a few other media. . He lives in Leucadia and took the time to talk about this project, staying away from Pinterest as part of his creative process, and a perfect weekend in the wilderness.

Question: Tell us about this public art program with North City.

A: North City’s development emphasizes public art and works with local and regional artists, be they painters, muralists or sculptors like me to bring unique and inspired works to the community. The installation of murals and sculptures throughout North City’s grounds brings artistic voice and inspiration to this type of urban development.

Question: Why was this something you wanted to participate in?

A: We are always looking for ways to challenge our manufacturing and design expertise, and it has been a unique opportunity to help create the artistic culture and atmosphere in North City… which has was exciting.

Question: Can you explain to us your creation process for this piece?

A: As with most of our concept projects, my lead architectural designer and I spend several days and nights playing with layouts and shapes, often modeling and rendering a handful of options using different materials and shapes. We were fortunate enough to witness the construction of the facility, from the concrete footing to the erection of the steel structure, and we were very fascinated by the shape, design and assembly of the walls of actual rock climbing at Mesa Rim.

We took a look at the backdrop to Mesa Rim and some notable rock climbing destinations in and around San Diego and ended up finding the GIS map of Mission Trails Regional Park. We used the topographic model to create the layout and undulations of the office.

What I like about Leucadia …

I love the Encinitas / Leucadia community and the small businesses here. There aren’t many places in San Diego with pedestrianized streets that lead to such a concentration of truly family-friendly retail stores like La Paloma Theater, Landmark Plant Co., or Bing Surf Shop.

Question: What was your inspiration for this piece?

A: The Prominence desk was inspired by the topographical layout of Mission Hills Regional Park, and the shapes themselves were semi-generated using parametric script using the shapes on the actual climbing walls. The functional rock gabion wall behind the desk is actually the Mesa Rim logo seen from a bird’s eye view, as you would see it from a mountain, and used locally sourced beach rocks as infill, an ode to the mountains meeting the ocean.

Question: Are you a full time professional artist?

A: We are a full time team of artists, craftspeople, designers and architects. The scope of our project extends from furniture, products, interior design to architecture and development. I personally started manufacturing fine art in high school and continued my high school education and career in welding, sculptural art, and architectural design at Mesa Community College. My job started in Phoenix, Arizona, designing pieces for local cafes and other places when I was 20, before moving to San Diego to fill a few contracts six years ago. Since then, we have grown and worked with several local brands including Mesa Rim, Ironsmith Coffee and Prager Bros.

Question: What prompted you to pursue the visual arts in this way? What attracted you to this form of creative expression?

A: After graduating from college, I had no interest in continuing to weld and had no background in design or architecture. I wanted to pursue wilderness therapy and nonprofit work with the Boy Scouts of America. I started welding for local stores in Phoenix while pursuing a second degree in Recreation Management at Northern Arizona University, when I was invited to come to San Diego for welding contracts. Everything else was learned and evolved from there.

Question: What inspires you in your work?

A: A major rule that I have is “no Pinterest”. I try to design things that you have never seen before. I also take inspiration from the process of other media, and as soon as I learn a new process, I research it and try to reinvent a way to use it in future projects. I am also inspired by my environment. After working with North City, I was inspired by the vision of growing development to create personalized and unique pieces that resonate with the community.

Question: What was difficult about your job?

A: Take time off work and delegate responsibilities. I insist on being a part of every step of the way. Between administration, design, manufacturing and installations, I tend to work 8am to 8pm everyday, including weekends. Custom manufacturing always has its own challenges, as there is no instruction manual on the buildings you design.

Question: What has been rewarding about this job?

A: I love to see my work come to life and be part of a community. The sculptures and the work I did with North City are now a part of the lives of so many people who are foreign to me. However, my works of art are something they see and walk every day. It’s also rewarding to work with business leaders, artists and even other local trades to learn more about their process and their passions, whether it’s bread baking, coffee roasting, ceramics, etc. It’s crazy to hear people talk about their world and the materials they use. , tools, procurement process. Whenever I hire a subcontractor to help me with a trade that I don’t know, I sit there to help them and observe them.

Question: What did you learn about yourself from this job?

A: I am a “yes” man. There is always a way to do something.

Question: What’s the best advice you’ve ever received?

A: Recently, I heard more and more people in the trades to outsource, delegate, subcontract. I used to spend my nights trying to do things outside of my scope, whether it was painting, doing electrical work, caulking window joints, or scheduling windows. security alarms. I learn more about finding the right people for the right job, and that I don’t always have to figure things out on my own. When every project is different, consult the experts if you want every detail done expertly.

Question: What’s the one thing people would be surprised to find out about you?

A: I was born deaf! I had restricted hearing canals when I was born and was mostly dumb until I was 5, and then learned to speak when I was 7.

Question: Please describe your ideal weekend in San Diego.

A: I love to explore the desert and take more time on weekends to camp, hike and cycle in the desert.


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Israeli mayor faces backlash for forcing museum to remove artwork he says used ‘gutter language’ https://utopicstudios.com/israeli-mayor-faces-backlash-for-forcing-museum-to-remove-artwork-he-says-used-gutter-language/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 17:40:49 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/israeli-mayor-faces-backlash-for-forcing-museum-to-remove-artwork-he-says-used-gutter-language/ Late last month, an Israeli art museum unceremoniously removed a political painting from a group exhibit. Today, dozens of artists in the exhibition decry the move as an act of censorship – and they demand that their own works be removed in protest. At the heart of the controversy is Jerusalem, a 1997 painting by […]]]>

Late last month, an Israeli art museum unceremoniously removed a political painting from a group exhibit. Today, dozens of artists in the exhibition decry the move as an act of censorship – and they demand that their own works be removed in protest.

At the heart of the controversy is Jerusalem, a 1997 painting by Israeli artist David Reeb that depicts inverted images of an Orthodox man praying at the Western Wall with the captions “Golden Jerusalem” and “Shit Jerusalem”.

The artwork has been included in “The institution», An exhibition of more than 60 Israeli artists inaugurating the recently renovated Ramat Gan Israeli Art Museum outside Tel Aviv.

Days after the exhibition opened on December 23, the mayor of Ramat Gan, Carmel Shama-Hacohen, posted a photo of Reeb’s painting on his Facebook profile, asking his followers whether the work was “shameful. Was to be removed from the exhibition.

“Jerusalem is a symbol that is in the heart of every Jew and sacred to all religions,” he wrote in a follow-up article. “Ramat Gan did not build a museum for a huge sum of money and will not subsidize it every year to expose his children and others to gutter language.”

Shama-Hacohen then asked the museum to remove the painting, which the institution quickly did.

“I was surprised by the ridiculous accusation by the mayor of Ramat Gan that this is a ‘racist painting’,” Reeb told Artnet News in an email. “Of course, that’s not such a thing. I absolutely respect religious people of all beliefs and faiths and have fought racism all my life. I guess it’s easier for some people to call it racist or anti-Semitic than it is to take responsibility for the dispossession and oppression we live with.

After Reeb’s paint was removed, around 40 other performers from the show covered their contributions with a black sheet as a sign of solidarity. Shama-Hacohen then asked the museum administration to remove the clothes, and again the museum nodded.

Reeb added that the board of directors of the Ramat Gan museum “acted as a buffer for the mayor, who pressured them and threatened that the museum would not be funded if the painting was not taken down.”

“Their capitulation to censorship threatens artistic freedoms and more generally democratic rights,” he added.

After the mayor’s move, 43 artists sent an open letter to the museum demanding the immediate removal of their works from the museum.

Freedom of expression has been severely damaged, the exhibition has become fundamentally flawed, and our working environment as artists has become dangerous and threatened,” the artists wrote in the letter.

Meanwhile, Reeb, working with the Civil Rights Association in Israel, challenged the action of the Ramat Gan Museum in a Tel Aviv district court, demanding that his painting be returned for display. The judge ruled in favor of the museum.

In one declaration on its website, the institution said it “regrets the need for a court ruling on this matter. Professional museum staff and museum board officials have expressed their views on the fear of a serious violation of the autonomy of the museum institution, the principle of freedom of expression and the statute of the museum. At the same time, we respect the court’s decision and will act according to the decision. “

The museum also launched an appeal to the artists participating in the exhibition.

“With you, in transparency and cooperation, we will overcome this crisis and prove that the reopening of the Israel Art Museum is an important and precious event for the field of art and for Israeli society, for its variety of identities. . “

Museum administrators could not be contacted for further comment.

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Archibald, Beatles and Desert Art: Summer Delights in Australia’s Regional Galleries | Culture https://utopicstudios.com/archibald-beatles-and-desert-art-summer-delights-in-australias-regional-galleries-culture/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 00:09:00 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/archibald-beatles-and-desert-art-summer-delights-in-australias-regional-galleries-culture/ Fancy a road trip to celebrate the end of a very trying year? Hop on your bike, charge the electric vehicle, shift gears on gas to visit one of Australia’s regional art galleries. And don’t forget to check the entry rules secured against Covid in advance. Geelong Gallery: Archie 100: a century of the Archibald […]]]>

Fancy a road trip to celebrate the end of a very trying year?

Hop on your bike, charge the electric vehicle, shift gears on gas to visit one of Australia’s regional art galleries. And don’t forget to check the entry rules secured against Covid in advance.

Geelong Gallery: Archie 100: a century of the Archibald Prize

Until February 20, 2022

The best paintings available in 100 years of the Archibald Prize have been brought together in an exhibition, called the Archie 100, and it’s a treat.

Most of the time, the Archibald’s annual portrait exhibition features a handful of notable works and plenty of medium to medium (and that’s nice) works, but for Archie 100 the selection process has chipped away a chunk of rock for reveal a Michelangelo’s David inside.

Okay, I’m exaggerating, but there’s no doubt that from the original 6,000 portraits curator Natalie Wilson gave us a superb selection, capturing not only the similarities, but most importantly the essence of the models.

Many of them aren’t winners (because judges are often wrong) but iconic images abound, including William Dargie’s Albert Namatjira, Natasha Bieniek’s Wendy Whiteley, John Brack’s Barry Humphries as Dame Edna and a self-portrait with Chuck Berry, among others. people, by Vincent Namatjira, great-grandson of Albert.

The Portrait of Albert Namatjira by William Dargie, 1956, is presented at the Geelong Gallery as part of the traveling exhibition of the Art Gallery of NSW Archie 100, A Century of the Archibald Prize. Photograph: Estate of William Dargie

If you’ve watched Finding the Archibald, hosted by Rachel Griffiths on ABC TV last year, you’ll know it all, but nothing beats seeing the real thing. There are also associated special events on offer, including night viewings on some Friday evenings and a curators’ conference. Archie 100 is a traveling exhibition of the Art Gallery of New South Wales and the Geelong Gallery is its only Victorian venue.

Ballarat International Photography Biennale

Last call for road tripers and locals, from now until mid-January, (exact date varies by location).

This central Victorian-era town is like a living open-air museum: experience real-time one of the world’s most impressive colonial architecture, gradual decline and a resurrection of the last days.

It’s all there in the fascinating streetscapes – a lot of which you can experience as you move between dozens of venues with exhibitions as part of the Ballarat International Foto Biennale, now extended until January.

The main one is the Ballarat Art Gallery, a compelling reminder of the claims of the attempts of the notables of the Golden Age to transplant the European academy to the antipodes.

Firmly in charge, curators and the wealthy, who would have thought that the very edifice they built in their image would one day host three photo exhibitions, each featuring a view from below and from outside that was once unthinkable.

The working class and the provincial Beatles, so central to the changing of the guard that made the British Empire instantly go out of fashion in the 1960s, are at the center of Linda McCartney: Retrospective. Two hundred photographs taken between 1965 and 1997 document the height of pop culture and beyond.

Iconic faces and intimate family photos feature in a selection curated by former Beatle Paul McCartney and his daughters, Linda, Mary and Stella. Hurry, because it ends on January 9th.

The Beatles, Abbey Road, London, 1969
The Beatles, Abbey Road, London, 1969, are on display at the Art Gallery of Ballarat as part of the exhibition Linda McCartney: Retrospective. Photography: Linda McCartney

Also on display is the view from the pink parts of the globe that powers both Robert Fielding’s Miil-Miilpa (Sacred) and Anindita Banerjee’s Ondormohol.

Fielding, an Aboriginal artist of Afghan descent, has built an impressive body of work exploring, or rather celebrating, the energizing presence of Tjukurpa (the Dream) in the lives of his Yankunytjatjara elders and the landscape around his community of Mimili, deep in the APY lands of the far north of South Australia.

The elders are depicted in close-up black-and-white elegiac photos that capture deep-grained, vigorous faces with the inner light of traditional traditions. The landscapes are captured in an experimental process that incorporates the sun and the earth as elements of the image, crushed by statements of ownership and belonging.

Banerjee, from Kolkata, Bengal, India, was struck by the familiarly evocative Victorian-style architecture of the public spaces in her adopted town, Ballarat.

The personal connection to Bengal and Ballarat, two outposts of the empire, one collapsing, the other restored to its magnificence, raises questions about how we see ‘here’ and ‘ over there ”and our relationship to time and the world around us.

The three exhibitions offer a nuanced and lively counterpoint to the imperial narrative embodied in the imperial architecture – frankly, often oppressive – of the city, within which their photographs operate their transgressive magic.

Alice springs

Desert Mob 30: celebration of 30 years of Desert Mob exhibitions. Reopening from January 11 to June 1, 2022.

Since 1991, the annual Desert Mob Exhibition at the Government of the Northern Territory’s Araluen Arts Center in Alice Springs has been a showcase for community art centers in central Australia.

These tiny communities located in some of Australia’s most remote places have been the driving force behind the flourishing of desert Aboriginal art into one of the most dynamic contemporary art movements in the world.

Invention, risk-taking, sheer beauty, and an assertive self-confidence that is rarely found elsewhere – as the world (finally) acknowledges. And every year, the Araluen Arts Center acquires the best of them for its own collection of desert art. All the big names are included of course, but one of the biggest thrills of Desert Mob is discovering unknown artists displaying “a fully formed artistic expression based on deep cultural knowledge and sovereignty,” as Araluen Arts puts it. Center.

Until June 1, 2022, you can see the best of the best, a retrospective selection of 50 works from the Araluen’s Desert Mob collection. In my humble opinion, there is no more thrilling and exciting collection of recent desert art in the world – and it encompasses all forms of art, from sculpture, printmaking, and sculpture to painting, textiles and fibers.

Often raw and honest, he can be avant-garde adventurous and a lot of fun too.

If you’re looking to take art home with you during your stay at Alice, don’t miss selections from Raft artspace and Talapi – two long-established galleries that deal directly with community art centers owned and operated by of native people, so that you can be sure of the ethical provenance when purchasing.

Or come back to September 2022 and take a deep breath of the intoxicating scent of spring gum blossoms in the pure desert air as you make your way to the next annual Desert Mob exhibit. This is your chance to buy from dozens of stalls in the art center and also in the main exhibition.


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Home improvement shows in Houston, renovations without a demo can have a big impact https://utopicstudios.com/home-improvement-shows-in-houston-renovations-without-a-demo-can-have-a-big-impact/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 15:03:30 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/home-improvement-shows-in-houston-renovations-without-a-demo-can-have-a-big-impact/ Elizabeth Johnson is a CPA turned stay-at-home mom and her husband Chad is an engineer – right-brained people who know what they know and, more importantly, know what they don’t know. When they returned to the Houston area six years ago, they wanted to be in the woods and found a home that would suit […]]]>

Elizabeth Johnson is a CPA turned stay-at-home mom and her husband Chad is an engineer – right-brained people who know what they know and, more importantly, know what they don’t know.

When they returned to the Houston area six years ago, they wanted to be in the woods and found a home that would suit their family. They knew their home wasn’t necessarily stylish or fully functional, but didn’t know how to go about changing it.

So they got excited when they saw an item auctioned off at a charity event: a consultation with interior designer Caron Woolsey from Caron Woolsey Interiors.

Their quick consultation turned into more important work as Woolsey helped the couple with updates and new furnishings and accessories for much of the first floor of their home.

Throughout the pandemic, renovators and interior designers have been busy, a trend that is expected to remain strong throughout the New Year. Everyone seems to want things to be lightened up, brightened up, and made more comfortable.

“We started out small, figuring we were going to change the carpet in the master bedroom and maybe the carpet in the formal dining room,” Elizabeth said. “It was in the early days of COVID, and we started talking about everything from the kitchen and a bar, adding hardwood floors. “

The project only took six weeks as it was the start of the pandemic and you could still get furniture and materials quickly.

Elizabeth, soon to be 48, and Chad, 48, agreed some of their furniture should stay, but other changes – paint, hardware, lighting, furnishings and fixtures – could have a big impact, even in small doses. .

Their style is nurtured by their upbringing in a small town – he’s from Elk Mountain, Wyo., And her from a small town north of Kansas City – where nothing has ever been fancy, and everything was practical and functional. A simpler and more subtle farmhouse style was their goal.

The couple, married 16 years, met years ago when they were graduating from college and living in Houston. they then lived in a series of other towns before returning six years ago with their three daughters – Emma, ​​now 14; Claire, 10 years old; and Molly, 8.

They painted everything – walls and cabinets – and changed the floors everywhere. Carpet and ceramic tile floors are gone, replaced with wood floors and rugs.

The rugs were a lesson for Chad, who wondered why he should spend money on beautiful floors and then cover them with rugs.

“It seemed like a crazy concept to get rid of a carpet and put wood on it and then put some carpet in it,” Chad said, laughing, admitting defeat. “I lost this fight.”

Now he appreciates their form and function. Not only do they add color and texture to a room, but they also help define living spaces and for anyone who walks with bare feet, they make the home a lot more comfortable.

At the front of the Johnson house was a fireplace with a typical oak banister. Realizing the couple’s budget and the scale of the work ahead, Woolsey urged them to paint it – white balusters and a black handrail – a much cheaper alternative to finishing.

The high pile carpet on the stairs has been replaced with carpet with a neutral herringbone pattern. A lantern-style chandelier and a pair of matte black sconces complete the space.

An antique chest of drawers that was already there was accessorized with a blue and white ginger pot, a small lamp and a plant. “Every space needs some chinoiserie, even if it’s just one room and small in size,” Woolsey said of the finishing touches.

An office at the front of the house was dark and dreary, with stained-wood fitted wardrobes, brown walls, wood blinds, and 12-inch builder-grade floor tiles.

The home’s new hardwood floor has been extended to this study, and its built-in wardrobes are now painted white and beautifully decorated with things that matter, instead of being filled to the brim with anything and everything.

Once again, they had a rug to fill much of the room, and an old leather chair and ottoman live here as well.

A rustic antique brass light fixture appears to hang neatly in the center of the room, but it has been the subject of much argument.

Originally the room had a ceiling fan, fixtures that men generally love and interior designers usually try to replace. They can be great for creating a breeze on an outdoor porch or pavilion, but they can be an eyesore indoors.

Chad wanted to keep the fan, and Woolsey’s job was to change his mind.

“Elizabeth really wanted a light for the study, but Chad couldn’t see a reason. I said “what if we could find the most rustic light there is?” and he said he would think about it, ”Woolsey said. “I had to make him a partner in the decision… instead of saying that’s what you need to do and why.”

She finally found a more rustic one with a distressed finish and he agreed.

“It’s rude, and he loved it because it showed craftsmanship,” Woolsey said, noting that it worked well with the much-loved chair and ottoman, as well as keepsakes such as a skull and crossbones. animal from the hunting days of Chad and the crown he was playing. to college.

The kitchen update was more aesthetic, with new paint and cabinet hardware, a new sink, and lighting above the island and above the sink. While the peripheral cabinets are white, they opted for Restoration Hardware’s Light Silver Sage, a pale blue-gray, for the island. They replaced the brown stone countertops with white quartz and a butcher’s block top for the island.

In a project full of “savings” and “crazy expenses”, the wooden counter was a major “saving”. Because it wasn’t expensive, the couple knew that if they got bored quickly or didn’t like the way he was holding, they could easily change it later.

You can see the utility room from the kitchen, and its builder-grade tiling and orange-brown countertops were an eyesore. Now it has light gray printed floor tiles which are much more attractive and countertops similar to the kitchen.

Small changes made the master bedroom more livable, replacing a sofa that took up too much space with a small wooden and sisal bench, and adding decorative pillows, artwork, and plants.

Chad hated getting rid of that sofa because it and a few other pieces of furniture had come with the house as sweeteners when they were negotiating the price. Getting rid of them seemed like a crazy move – losing something he had worked hard to get it for.

Woolsey felt like the spacious room was very bright, but you couldn’t appreciate any of them as the couch ate so much space and was never really used.

A few novelties in the dining room have refreshed a space that anyone entering through the front door sees. They already had a white dresser and table, so Woolsey brought in new chairs and a light fixture, mixing black and white with natural fibers, just like they did in the kitchen.

A pair of upholstered hostess chairs mix with four black painted wooden chairs and two other chairs which are a combination of black metal frames with wooden seating. The chandelier has a matte black cage with natural fiber wrapped around its stems.

The Johnsons are the first to admit that if they had to choose chairs for themselves, the eight would match up exactly.

But Woolsey wanted to achieve the farmhouse look they preferred, delivered in more subtle ways, like the relaxed mix of black and white and touches of natural fibers.

In the formal living room, the Johnsons had sofas they loved, so Woolsey finished the room with everything else, a rug, tables and accessories including a mirror, lamp and sconces.

In Woolsey’s initial presentation to the couple, she suggested big changes to the powder-coated bathroom, a boring box with brown walls and an ugly light.

Knowing that the couple were more than a little scared of the color, she suggested adding white panels to the lower part of the walls and installing Thibaut’s Honshu animated wallpaper (in the Robin’s Egg colourway) shown below. above. A new pedestal sink with a country-style faucet, a pretty mirror and a two-globe light fixture complete the room in a small setting.

When Woolsey first mentioned the wallpaper to the Johnsons, they had a ‘deer in the headlights’ expression, she said. She assured them that it would not be old-fashioned wallpaper and that its color and pattern would be offset by the panels.

“We’re pretty dumb. I’m an engineer and she’s an accountant, but we love our house now, ”Chad said. “We can let the kids and the dog run around without feeling like they’re going to ruin everything. It’s amazing to walk through the house and think it’s ours.

Their daughters also love the changes and urge their parents to start upgrades to the second floor, where their bedrooms are located. Claire’s 11th birthday is approaching and she has already requested a new paint color and new bedding.

“I like to sit in the house now,” Elizabeth said. “It’s so pretty, and I love it – instead of just sitting there thinking I should change it.”

Diane.cowen@chron.com


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The High Desert Museum to begin accepting applications for the 2022 Waterston Desert Writing Prize https://utopicstudios.com/the-high-desert-museum-to-begin-accepting-applications-for-the-2022-waterston-desert-writing-prize/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 22:45:40 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/the-high-desert-museum-to-begin-accepting-applications-for-the-2022-waterston-desert-writing-prize/ BEND, Ore. (KTVZ) – The High Desert Museum will begin accepting nominations for the 2022 Waterston Desert Writing Prize on Saturday, January 1. The ninth annual award honors literary non-fiction that exemplifies artistic excellence, sensitivity to place, and desert literacy with the desert as the subject and setting. Early, mid-career and established writers are welcome […]]]>

BEND, Ore. (KTVZ) – The High Desert Museum will begin accepting nominations for the 2022 Waterston Desert Writing Prize on Saturday, January 1.

The ninth annual award honors literary non-fiction that exemplifies artistic excellence, sensitivity to place, and desert literacy with the desert as the subject and setting. Early, mid-career and established writers are welcome to apply.

The price has risen to $ 3,000 this year. The winner will also be presented at a reception and awards ceremony at the Bend Museum in September 2022.

Inspired by author and poet Ellen Waterston’s love for the High Desert, a region that has been her muse for over 30 years, the award recognizes the vital role that deserts play in the world in ecosystem and storytelling. human. In 2020, the High Desert Museum, which has long hosted events for the Prize, adopted the program.

“The literary arts provide such a dynamic way to explore the depth and complexity of deserts,” said museum executive director Dana Whitelaw, Ph.D. “And since its inception, the Waterston Desert Awards Writing Prize has been one of the Museum’s favorite events. We are delighted to have news from writers near and far in 2022. ”

The 2021 Waterston Desert Writing Award winner was Ceal Klingler (watchwhereyoulive.net) for “How we live with each other”. Klingler’s submission explained how animals, plants, and other organisms created habitable places with each other on the fringes of heat, cold, dehydration, flooding and fires at the westernmost overlap. of the Mojave and Grand Bassin deserts.

The 2021 finalists were Charles Hood (workman.com/authors/charles-hood) for “Deserts After Dark” and Joe Wilkins for “Desert Reckoning” (joewilkins.organization).

To learn more about the Waterston Desert Writing Prize and how to submit an entry, visit highdesertmuseum.org/waterston-prize. Submissions will be accepted until Sunday, May 1 at 11:59 p.m.

The High Desert Museum is also excited to announce the return of the Waterston Student Essay Competition, open to young writers from Crook, Deschutes, Harney, Jefferson and Lake counties. It is open to students in grades 9 to 12, in a public or private school, or at home. The submission is free. Students may submit 750-1,000 word non-fiction prose essays to waterston@highdesertmuseum.org from January 1, 2022 to May 1, 2022. Submissions will be judged on originality, clarity of expression, accuracy and their contribution to the understanding and appreciation of desert regions.

To learn more about the Waterston Student Essay Competition and how to submit an entry, visit highdesertmuseum.org/waterston-student-prize.

ABOUT THE MUSEUM:

THE HIGH DESERT MUSEUM opened in Bend, Oregon in 1982. It brings together wildlife, cultures, art, history and the natural world to convey the wonders of the high desert of North America. The museum is a 501 (c) 3 non-profit organization accredited by the American Alliance of Museums, is an affiliate of the Smithsonian, is the 2019 recipient of the Western Museums Association’s Charles Redd Award for Excellence in exhibition and is a 2021 recipient of the National Museum and Library Service Medal. To find out more, visit highdesertmuseum.org and follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.



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Art review: Classical music translated into colorful compositions https://utopicstudios.com/art-review-classical-music-translated-into-colorful-compositions/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 09:00:37 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/art-review-classical-music-translated-into-colorful-compositions/ Don’t be surprised if you think you hear tunes from Mozart’s “Don Giovanni” as you approach 100 Fore Street, the address of the Elizabeth Moss Galleries’ new Old Port outpost. Moss is not actually showing the opera in the gallery. But there is no need. The paintings of “Lynne Mapp Drexler: Orchestrations in Color”, through […]]]>

Don’t be surprised if you think you hear tunes from Mozart’s “Don Giovanni” as you approach 100 Fore Street, the address of the Elizabeth Moss Galleries’ new Old Port outpost.

Moss is not actually showing the opera in the gallery. But there is no need. The paintings of “Lynne Mapp Drexler: Orchestrations in Color”, through Friday, provide the soundtrack. Drexler was passionate about classical music, and many of her abstract paintings from the 1950s and 1960s were visual interpretations of the music she experienced at Carnegie Hall, which she channeled into sketches she drew from her career. sits during performances.

Back in her studio, she used them as starting points for intensely colored, densely layered compositions with idiosyncratic brand combinations: Seurat and Pissarro’s stippling, Van Gogh’s thick and thick swirls and strokes, geometric shapes. more defined by Hans Hofmann (one of his most influential teachers, along with Robert Motherwell), the fast and rhythmic notes of Cézanne.

Mentioning all of these stylistic influences in no way diminishes the individuality of Drexler’s work. When asked her friend Tralice Bracy to define what makes a good artist, Drexler replied, “Someone who has their own vision and commitment and sticks to it… and doesn’t sell themselves.” Drexler, who died on Monhegan Island in 1999, was undoubtedly such an artist.

It was in fact her commitment to her art that led her to voluntarily exile from New York in 1983, when she decided to abandon an art scene that she deemed had become superficial and commercial in order to live the whole life. year on Monhegan.

She and her husband, fellow painter John Hultberg, had bought a house there and had spent many summers painting outdoors.. By the 1980s, its measured early success – still eclipsed by the male-dominated American Abstract Expressionist movement – had waned, and a new school of painting, Pop Art, had eclipsed Ab Ex as an “it” genre.

What strikes you most immediately is the Drexler palette. It’s a confident rash without holes of deeply saturated pigment, and it’s applied in thick, brash strokes. “Eclipse”, for example, is an intricate construction painting that ripples across the surface with tangerine and spice oranges, citrine and golden yellows, scarlet and vermilion reds, cobalt and cerulean blues, purples and plum purples, tawny and shaded browns.

Most of the paintings in this exhibition are therefore spectacularly polychrome. “Bubbled Pink” is a fugue that ranges from pink to fuchsia to crimson. “Celestial Division” is a kaleidoscopic sampling of so many nuances that it would take several paragraphs to discuss it here.

Lynne Drexler, “Papers 190”

Even with works that initially appear dark and monochrome, such as “Paperwork # 190,” “Paperwork # 191”, and “Thematic Repeat,” close inspection reveals many subtle variations in hue within a theme.

The first paintings here are various works on paper by Drexler made in 1959. They are emblematic of Motherwell’s belief that an artist should approach a surface without preconceived notions of form or composition. The emphasis should be on process and expression. Using a rainbow of colors, Drexler created several layers of brushstrokes that resemble mosaic tiles. They seem to spring up like confetti from an imperceptible existential void deep within the paper.

The feeling of creating something from nothing by gradually building up a surface with repeated markings would stay with Drexler his entire life. Some have also cited Gustav Klimt as a possible source. But for Klimt, these marks, derived from Art Nouveau motifs and erotic allusions, were very decorative. In Drexler’s work, marks – at least until the end of his life – became the real material of manifestation. The autonomous gesture replaces the subject, whether a painting is inspired by a concerto or a landscape.

As his style matured, the vocabulary of brands grew. She never abandoned Hans Hofmann’s push-and-pull theory, which postulated that effective pictorial space depends on a tension between perfectly articulated color planes and a more gestural expressionist field of overlapping forms. She kept adding to this stylistic lexicon.

Lynne Drexler, “Longing for the Heat”

The push-and-pull is clearly visible in ‘Heat Nostalgia’, the last painting in the exhibition, dated 1980. Green rectangles and squares and purple circles around the border contrast with the dotted lines and slashes which dominate the picture. They are even more pronounced in “Radiation”, from 1977.

By the end of the 1960s, Drexler had begun to turn to more representative subjects, mainly landscapes by Monhegan. Although very stylized, “Heat Nostalgia” is clearly a view of grasses and lupines across a meadow, possibly the same meadow that stretched from her house to the cottages bordering the rocky coast of the island.

1976’s “Winter Serenity” is almost certainly a woody scene, probably also from Monhegan. But even without knowing the title of “Sunset Sea” (1969), the wavy markings and predominantly blue palette make the subject clear.

Eventually, Drexler felt that she had exhausted the possibilities of abstraction and turned to painting still-life compositions of flowers in vases, dolls, and clothes in a line, beating in the breeze. The marks – especially the rectangles and tessera-like squares – moved in interesting ways in the background as in Klimt’s paintings, although they still had a function beyond decoration: c that is to say, articulating a depth of space.

None of the latter paintings are in the exhibition. The reality is, while they felt unique to her in one way or another, these weren’t Drexler’s best works. This show – whose course is far too brief, so hurry up to see it – proclaims the singular voice she has carved out of the Ab Ex movement. You know a Drexler when you see one, both because that her style was so personal and because she had no imitators. Witnessing the lushness and visual power of these paintings makes the way she was ignored in her lifetime seems like a grave injustice.

Still, while it may be tempting to view his withdrawal from Monhegan as some sort of retreat, I prefer to see it as an act of defiance and liberation. From the start, Drexler refused to conform to fashion, indicating to me her isolation as an extraordinary display of willpower, clearly motivated by the importance she placed on her art and the assurance that what she did matter a lot.

On her deathbed, surrounded by friends, the painter Alice Boynton dons “Don Giovanni” to accompany Drexler into the afterlife. Boynton remembers Drexler, who perhaps loved Jack Daniels too much, rightly breathed his last during the opera’s champagne aria. “Orchestrations in color” has an equally festive meaning. In a way, it’s a well-deserved toast to a great artist.

Jorge S. Arango has been writing about art, design and architecture for over 35 years. He lives in Portland. He can be contacted at: [email protected]


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Octopus breeding is the ultimate expression of our disconnection with nature https://utopicstudios.com/octopus-breeding-is-the-ultimate-expression-of-our-disconnection-with-nature/ Thu, 23 Dec 2021 16:48:24 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/octopus-breeding-is-the-ultimate-expression-of-our-disconnection-with-nature/ Bird in Hand by Ellen Gallagher 2006 / Tate The concept of breeding octopus in captivity for food, as announced this week by a Spanish company about to open the world’s first octopus farm, raised all kinds of sediment. Why should we oppose it? Octopuses are intelligent, we are told, they need stimulation and play […]]]>

The concept of breeding octopus in captivity for food, as announced this week by a Spanish company about to open the world’s first octopus farm, raised all kinds of sediment. Why should we oppose it? Octopuses are intelligent, we are told, they need stimulation and play to express their culture. Well, pigs and cows too. And the dolphins. And, to varying and questionable ethical degrees, we keep all of these in unnatural environments. Yet with UK law impending which will require the culling of lobsters and crabs to be human, our attention is turned to other inhabitants of the marine ecosphere.

This can be a difficult, even slippery step for some. The octopus is the other supernatural, so completely different from us that we look at it with wonder and revulsion. All those extra members. It is not natural. Maybe we are jealous. As we become aware of the sensitivity of these short-lived, rubbery, extended cephalopods, we also become aware of eating the brain of another organism. An alien brain, in a tank.

As Australian scientist and diver Peter Godfrey-Smith explored in his groundbreaking book, Other minds: the octopus and the evolution of intelligent life, octopus arms (not tentacles, note) have their own individual nerve groups, making up something akin to separate brains for each limb; as if one could disagree with the other. We contrast it with nature, with childhood dreams and nightmares. Visions, for those of a certain age, of a split-chin Kirk Douglas fighting with a giant (simulated) octopus in the Disney version of Jules Verne’s film Twenty thousand leagues under sea.

Connoisseurs of art history will think of 1814 woodcut by Hokusai where we see an octopus lodged between the legs of a geisha indulging itself or even inseminating it, like the snake-necked swan in the classic myth of Leda. The octopus’ wavy shapeshifting quality also equates to a more modern sensibility of what we find acceptable and what we decide not to be. In his astonishing image, Hand bird (2006) American artist Ellen Gallagher subtly questions the black experience by transforming Herman Melville’s Captain Ahab into a bizarre afro-futuristic alien pirate with an afro fish hairstyle, a green parrot in his hand and an artificial leg transforming into intertwined cephalopodic limbs and penetrate it. Like the academic Caoimhin Mac Giolla Léith Remarks in his brilliant new monograph on the artist, Gallagher’s image evokes the idea “that the bodies of the African-American diaspora are always on the verge of virtuosity or despair.”

Aesthetically, the octopus has an advantage when it comes to self-expression. He can not only change the color of his skin depending on his local environment – sandy soil, barnacle rock – he can change the actual shape and texture to replicate those surfaces. In 1924, the radical American modernist poet Marianne Moore, fascinated by the fleeting quality of these creatures, wrote her poem, An octopus – considered Moore’s response to TS Eliot’s Wasteland – in which the animal’s “ghostly pallor” transforms into the metallic green hue of a pool of anemones, then turns into a glacier, into glass, then becomes an octopus again. Moore looks in a distorted mirror, seeing the reflection of human dissatisfaction with ourselves.

The physical space of the octopus in our world is also changing. It can escape through holes that seem incredibly small; it only needs an opening large enough to admit its parrot’s beak. Anyone who looks at a living octopus underwater will testify to this almost magical ability of the animal to be there one instant, disappear the next, as if it had transported or teleported to an interior space in the ocean. , another dimension.

We cannot think of these strange creatures as anything else because, as recent studies have shown, octopuses are evolutionarily distinct from us, having had the temerity to branch out into an order of their own 560 million ago. ‘years. The idea that they are brought up in an installation speaks exactly of this feeling of disconnection with us, in morphology, space and time. Some find octopus delicious, others repulsive, others sublime. Raising them under our control, rather than putting them in safety under a stone at the bottom of the sea, is a last major offense, it seems; as if we had ripped out our own antediluvian origins and stuffed them into a goldfish bowl, before beating and frying them.

From whales to shrimp, all sea creatures suffer from this sense of our hegemony, our hierarchy, our domination, because of their pride in deciding not to share our earthly exile. We punish them with captivity and consumption. We consume them in our consumer society. We tie them on lines to dry like so many viscous laundry. They are asked to choose the winners of the football tournaments, or they are fingered in the aquarium. They look back, thinking about our thoughtlessness.

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In his book, The soul of an octopus, Sy Montgomery attests that captive octopuses at the New England Aquarium in Boston can’t stand the stench of some humans. They particularly hate smokers, whose cephalopods can taste tar residue with their arms. While the octopuses judge our follies, we watch them in a state of confusion. We cannot admit any rivals, no matter how many extra legs they have.

[see also: Watching Netflix’s My Octopus Teacher, I wonder why we like to imagine animals are our friends]



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Art for the Senses: The Sensory Art Exhibition Showcases Student Works | https://utopicstudios.com/art-for-the-senses-the-sensory-art-exhibition-showcases-student-works/ Mon, 20 Dec 2021 18:41:15 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/art-for-the-senses-the-sensory-art-exhibition-showcases-student-works/ The new improved sensory room of the Student accessibility help center (SASC) is now showing artwork from art students in classes ARS 205 (Ideas and Shapes Section L04) and ARS 403 (Socially Engaged Art) by Professor Nobuho Nagasawa. The Sensory Room is located in the Stony Brook Union, Suite 107, and is designed to help […]]]>

The new improved sensory room of the Student accessibility help center (SASC) is now showing artwork from art students in classes ARS 205 (Ideas and Shapes Section L04) and ARS 403 (Socially Engaged Art) by Professor Nobuho Nagasawa.

The Sensory Room is located in the Stony Brook Union, Suite 107, and is designed to help students who need to receive or exclude sensory input and help them relax and soothe their senses. Inspired by the Sensory Hall, Nagasawa students created art installations that expressed their individual perceptions of the senses and how their art can best appease participants.

On December 6, SASC hosted a showcase showcasing students’ creative works of art at the student union’s COLA fair before the facilities found a permanent home in the SASC’s sensory room.

“SASC contacted the College of Arts and Sciences” Department of Arts regarding the fact that the students create a sensory art experience for the students using the sensory room, and we had several meetings with Professor Nagasawa and the students to discuss the collaboration, ”described SASC director Wendi Mathews. Under the guidance of Nagasawa and SASC staff, each student was asked to think about how best to engage the senses of viewers with their art using different media to create olfactory, tactile, kinetic, auditory forms of expression. and visual.

Sensory art therapy is a type of treatment that uses all kinds of art to explore emotions, resolve psychological conflicts, reduce anxiety, and decrease physical pain. “We were very excited about the Sensory Art Showcase. The goal was to create a work of art that would encourage students to use a variety of art forms to help them adapt, showcase these talented artists, and be able to use their art for years in the future. sensory room of the Student Accessibility Support Center. Mathews said.

Sensory art fair

Erica Lynch’22 created a very interactive piece – named Live nature, 2021 – which enhanced touch, auditory senses and smell. Lynch researched plants in the Avalon Nature Reserve and took imprints of the leaves, then she used acrylic paint and a jelly press to get the images on paper and placed the foliage found in the artwork. She also made two recordings of water mixed with music on QR codes that leave the participant with a sense of calm as they play on their ears. Asked about his work, Lynch said, “In essence, I hope this sums up the senses and the experience of nature. I hope this will inspire people to use nature as an adaptive capacity in their toolkit. “

Hongrui Zhang’22 created one of the showcase’s many visually exciting installations. Using tape, mylar paper and glue, he created a handmade kaleidoscope, titled VR Kaleidoscope 202. The overall design was inspired by virtual reality, where the mental escape from a busy life is useful, especially when the participant places themselves inside the vibrant colors of the kaleidoscope. “[I think] Mental escape is a key point in the sensory room, ”he said in his article, and to his credit, the showcase participants were transported as they turned their heads one way and the other. the other, while holding the helmet of the kaleidoscope.

One room that really encompassed the feel of the sensory room was Blue light, 2021 by Sarah Conway’24. A large cardboard box with a heavy dark blue blanket resting on it, although of very conspicuous size, is such a deceptively ordinary piece that when the participant finally comes face to face with the coin, those who peek under the blanket is met with a gentle serenity as the white light and the sound of daylight are engulfed and all that remains is a brilliant, deep blue light. As the viewer gazes into the light, everything inside is made of cardboard and hot glue. In the center is a very standard living room bed, desk and chair to the side. “I would like to leave the interpretation of the scene to the viewer because I want to see how the space is transmitted to each individual,” said Conway.

Students can visit and stimulate their senses in the sensory room. Take a look – or feel or even smell – the interactive and calming pieces of these student artists.

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