Art expression – Utopic Studios http://utopicstudios.com/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 17:46:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://utopicstudios.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-3-120x120.png Art expression – Utopic Studios http://utopicstudios.com/ 32 32 Vedanta puts its Sterlite copper smelter in Tamil Nadu up for sale https://utopicstudios.com/vedanta-puts-its-sterlite-copper-smelter-in-tamil-nadu-up-for-sale/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 13:59:00 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/vedanta-puts-its-sterlite-copper-smelter-in-tamil-nadu-up-for-sale/ NEW DELHI: Vedanta has put its Sterlite copper smelter plant in Thoothukudi in Tamil Nadu up for sale after encountering numerous obstacles in reopening the unit and has invited potential buyers to show interest. The factory was closed in 2018 following an order from the Tamil Nadu Pollution Control Board for environmental reasons. In an […]]]>
NEW DELHI: Vedanta has put its Sterlite copper smelter plant in Thoothukudi in Tamil Nadu up for sale after encountering numerous obstacles in reopening the unit and has invited potential buyers to show interest.
The factory was closed in 2018 following an order from the Tamil Nadu Pollution Control Board for environmental reasons.
In an announcement in the Vedanta newspaper in conjunction with Axis Capital has invited an Expression of Interest (EOI) for “the sale of the state-of-the-art smelter and refining complex located at Tuticorin, Tamil Nadu”.
The last day to submit the Expression of Interest is July 4th.
According to the Vedanta spokesperson, the Tuticorin plant is a national asset which has satisfied 40% of the national copper demand and played a vital role in the country’s copper self-sufficiency.
“In the best interests of the country and the people of Tamil Nadu, we are exploring options to ensure that the plant and assets are better utilized to meet the nation’s growing demand,” the spokesperson said.
The advertisement further stated that the plant brings about Rs 2,500 crore to the treasury, 12% of Thoothukudi port revenue, 95% sulfuric acid market share in Tamil Nadu, direct employment for 5,000 people and another 25,000 indirectly through the value chain.
The plant meets the highest ESG and environmental standards compared to its global peers, he said.
The unit plays a vital role in meeting the growing domestic demand for copper.
The Tamil Nadu government last year cleared Vedanta’s sealed Sterlite copper plant in Thoothukudi to operate for the production of medical oxygen given the depletion of oxygen supplies amid the massive spread of cases of Covid-19.
When granting the license, the state government had asked the Sterlite plant not to be involved in the production of copper or any other material.
The Tamil Nadu government had ordered the state’s pollution control office to seal and “permanently” close the Vedanta Groupat the Tuticorin copper factory after violent protests that left 13 dead in police shootings.
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“We have all these people who have come before us, and we carry that into who we are.” Our Year of the Tiger series continues. https://utopicstudios.com/we-have-all-these-people-who-have-come-before-us-and-we-carry-that-into-who-we-are-our-year-of-the-tiger-series-continues/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 23:20:35 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/we-have-all-these-people-who-have-come-before-us-and-we-carry-that-into-who-we-are-our-year-of-the-tiger-series-continues/ The Year of the Tiger launched with this Lunar New Year is a time of pride and reflection for Princeton’s vibrant Asian and Asian American community. Throughout the year, we elevate the voices of faculty, staff, students, alumni and scholars in a series of thoughtful interviews exploring questions of identity, pride, hope, lived experience of […]]]>

The Year of the Tiger launched with this Lunar New Year is a time of pride and reflection for Princeton’s vibrant Asian and Asian American community. Throughout the year, we elevate the voices of faculty, staff, students, alumni and scholars in a series of thoughtful interviews exploring questions of identity, pride, hope, lived experience of anti-Asian racism and meaningful action allies can take. .

While in undergrad, Lu performed with Triple 8, the East Asian American student dance ensemble at Princeton.

We continue the series with Serena Lu, from the Class of 2020, who now works as a paralegal in the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office at the Bureau of Major Economic Crimes through a Princeton AlumniCorps 55 Project Scholarship.

Lu is also an actor and dancer. She recently returned to competitive rhythmic gymnastics – she trained with the hope of competing in the Olympics in Princeton, but had retired in her sophomore year. She attended the Class of 2020 in-person promotion on May 18 with her parents.

How do you identify yourself?

I am Chinese American. My parents are from China, my mother from the north in an area called Harbin, my father from the south, I don’t know where, what he will be upset to learn. They both went to Peking University and moved here about 30 years ago. My sister and I were born here and raised in Blaine, Minnesota.

When I think of identity, my cultural identity is not the first thing that comes to mind. I felt I had to create other identities that allowed people to develop an image of me outside of what I looked like: classical pianist, competitive rhythmic gymnast, athlete. These things established legitimacy. I experienced a huge loss of identity and deep grief when I retired from rhythmic gymnastics in 2018.

I refused to speak Chinese growing up, even though my parents spoke Chinese at home. I had been embarrassed that my parents had an accent because the kids at school were mean. I remember in third grade we were doing a verbal spelling exercise and I was spelling this word. My dad pronounces the letter H as “etch” instead of “aitch”. I pronounced it “etch” and everyone started laughing. Our desks had tops that lifted up so you could put your things on them – I refused to go out for recess. I just put my head in my office.

My parents would pack my lunch for school and it was dumplings or something and the kids would be like, “Ew, what’s that?” I wanted more than anything to have a school lunch in the cafeteria, even though I loved what my parents cooked. I was going to school and I thought I should be as un-Asian as possible.

Serena Lu '20 with her father and with her mother

Lu returned to campus for the in-person launch of the Class of 2020 with her father, Sean Lu (left), and mother, Dongfang Zhao.

Part of my parents’ identity to us was discipline – a lot of hard work, humility, and focus. These are essential skills that I always rely on. My parents are very quiet people and don’t talk about their sacrifices, but I know. I think they wanted my sister and I to grow up understanding what it’s like to work hard and dedicate yourself to something.

We moved to New York in 2010 so my sister and I could get gymnastics training. Soon after, we both made the national team. I really identified as a United States national team athlete. I was extremely proud of it, not only because it’s such a hard thing to do, but also because I never wanted anything more than to compete knowing that I was representing America. I never once thought, “I’m a Chinese American from the United States,” I was just like, “I’m American. I represent this country.”

What makes you proud to be an Asian American?

Serena Lu '20 competes as a rhythmic gymnast

Lu, pictured here at the 2015 US National Gymnastics Championships, recently returned to competitive rhythmic gymnastics – she trained for the Olympics in Princeton but retired as a sophomore

Sometimes it’s really hard to be proud because, honestly, I’m ashamed that I tried so hard to get away from that identity. I’m trying to work on being comfortable identifying myself that way.

Before I can be proud, I think there has to be a discussion between me and my parents, my sister and my friends. Everyone is so quiet about the fear we feel right now as Asian Americans. With my parents, we don’t talk about a lot of things because that’s not really the thing we do. We need to heal as part of the larger community, come to terms with whatever is going on and just be able to talk about it.

We’re more comfortable showing how much we care than talking about what’s going on. For example, I know that my parents are afraid for me in this climate of anti-Asian violence. My dad won’t let me take the subway at night. He drives me to the gym every day, six days a week, which is so out of his way. He lives in Staten Island and I work in Manhattan and my gym is in Brooklyn. I worry about my parents the same way because it’s so scary to know that anything can happen, it’s so random. We need to start talking about our fear.

What can allies and others do to counter Asian-American racism?

I’m at that age where I spend most of my time with my friends. I think it’s as simple — and it’s not as simple — as listening. I would say, just listen to the fears and concerns your Asian American friends may have about certain topics. Understand that it is difficult for them to express these things and really try to hear them when they do. Many of my Asian American friends don’t feel like they have people to talk to about these issues or don’t feel like they are heard when they do.

Recently I had a conversation with some of my friends about the fear of taking the subway and walking around at night in Manhattan. It’s really terrifying. The first step is to listen and verify your friends who are scared. Many of us didn’t grow up in environments where you can be comfortable just saying you’re scared. I always feel like I’m taking someone’s time if I do this, or someone’s going to think I’m doing all this for myself. Just be there as a listener and try to understand. Before anything can be done, we must all come to this understanding.

Wanting to express concern for your Asian American friends, the people you care about, goes a long way. It’s not indiscreet. It shows that you care about yourself and want to know how you feel. Also, keep an open mind about the things you learn.

And get this: Not all Asians are the same. We all go through different things. Even with my Chinese-American friends, many of our families are different. Go beyond, “I like to eat this food. So then, I understand what it is.” Get over the fact that you can enjoy certain parts of the culture – music, movies, shows. Getting beyond that surface-level distinction is really important. I’m glad that Asian American art and media is front and center, but that’s where the real understanding begins.

Another thing that I think is really helpful is reading books and listening to podcasts from Asian people about their experience. I think these are great resources. I keep discovering new AAPI artists to support.

Some books I would recommend are “All You Can Ever Know” by Nicole Chung, “An Inconvenient Minority” by Kenny Xu, “Days of Distraction” by Alexandra Chang, “Minor Feelings” by Cathy Park Hong, “Sigh, Gone” by Phuc Tran and “The Loneliest Americans” by Jay Caspian Kang.

Asian Enough,” “Dear Asian Americans,” and “Self Evident: Asian American Stories” are three powerful podcasts.

Are there any examples of what you are involved in to counter Asian American racism that empowers you?

For me, the most important thing is my involvement in the arts, being in performance spaces where people historically didn’t want you to be.

I was recently in a student film by someone at NYU film school. This is a story about the meaning of family. It’s a personal yet universal story, told through the lens of two Asian American characters. The story is what’s in the foreground – not the fact that the characters are Asian American, although there are elements in the film that highlight the fact that they grew up in that culture. These are the stories that I hope to see become more commonplace.

I’m also a member of the Movement’s new headquarters, which is striving to create a company of dancers that looks like what New York looks like. I think it’s an important feeling.

Back in competitive rhythmic gymnastics has been a journey to find ways of expression related to my Asian American identity. Before I retired, I never really thought about what I could say with my routines. Now I work with Anthony Chen ’20, a friend I made in Triple 8, the East Asian American dance ensemble at Princeton. He helped me design my Asian art-oriented tape routine and helped me create the soundtrack, a medley of music from the 2002 martial arts film “Hero.”

My routine is in three parts in homage to “Hero”, a tale of three famous assassins and how the protagonist overcomes them. Each part highlights a different style of movement, which I learned while researching Chinese dance and martial arts. It’s nice to have that intentionality and show people for the first time that this is who I am. Maybe I wasn’t so proud of it before, but now I am.

My drama teacher always instills in his students that we are like vessels to our past. He says it’s very important for us to know where we come from and to understand that we have all these people who came before us and we carry that in who we are.

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Read previous conversations with Yibin Kang, Warner-Lambert/Parke-Davis Professor of Molecular Biology;Stephen Kim, Associate Director of the Princeton University Art Museum; andYi-Ching Ong, director of Princeton’s Service Focus program.

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Push for dress code tattoo bans to be included in Queensland’s anti-discrimination law https://utopicstudios.com/push-for-dress-code-tattoo-bans-to-be-included-in-queenslands-anti-discrimination-law/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 20:22:25 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/push-for-dress-code-tattoo-bans-to-be-included-in-queenslands-anti-discrimination-law/ A Queensland businessman wants anti-discrimination laws changed to stop pubs, clubs and restaurants from barring people with face and neck tattoos. Key points: The Queensland Human Rights Commission is currently reviewing the state’s anti-discrimination law Civil liberties advocates, tattoo artists and people with tattoos are pushing for laws to include dress codes prohibiting people with […]]]>

A Queensland businessman wants anti-discrimination laws changed to stop pubs, clubs and restaurants from barring people with face and neck tattoos.

His push has won backing from civil libertarians and tattoo artists, with lawyers saying owners of venues with discriminatory dress codes are already breaking existing human rights laws – but the issue has yet to be tested in front of the public. courts.

Daniel Lowry, 34, has a large rose tattoo on his neck and other visible body art.

“I’m a young Australian, I’m a business owner, I’m a musician,” he said.

Mr Lowry has been refused entry to restaurants because of his tattoos.(ABC News: Michael Lloyd)

Over the years he has been refused entry to venues on the Gold Coast and Brisbane – including a family birthday dinner at The Blackbird in Brisbane’s Eagle St Pier and the popular Burleigh Pavilion when he visited Burleigh Heads on his honeymoon.

“Moments like that are very frustrating because the reasoning makes absolutely no sense to me. I should be able to dine out with my family.”

Submission to change laws

As the Queensland Human Rights Commission is currently reviewing the state’s anti-discrimination law, Mr Lowry has filed a petition with lawmakers asking them to make anti-tattoo dress codes illegal.

At the moment, they are not covered by Queensland’s Anti-Discrimination Act, written 30 years ago.

A report will be delivered to the attorney general next month detailing proposed changes to the laws after submissions on a wide range of issues.

A tattooed man walks his dog down a suburban street
Mr Lowry says he feels like he is lumped in with ‘extremists’ and ‘criminals’ because of his body art.(ABC News: Michael Lloyd)

According to Mr Lowry, he called for tattoos to be classified as “physical characteristics” and “bodily characteristics” which cannot be discriminated against.

“The subtext of what they’re saying is that you belong to a group, and there are criminals or extremists in that group, and we’re going to kick you all out because of that.”

Tattoo artists want change

Gold Coast tattoo artist Tim Ebbles, owner of Borderline Tattoos in Burleigh Heads for more than two decades, said many customers with visible tattoos no longer go out to pubs and clubs because they know they would not enter.

“I think tattooed people are very persecuted or watched,” he said.

A man stands behind art in a tattoo shop
Mr Ebbles says many customers with tattoos on their faces and necks no longer go to approved venues.(ABC News: Alexandria Utting)

“Everyone should be allowed to go wherever they want and have a beer, relax and have fun.”

Tattoo artist Jayden Moles says many people use body art to mark important events or remember loved ones.

“There are people who have good jobs and are well covered in tattoos, say, from wrist to toe, but at the same time they are not well seen either.

“It’s 2022, we’re in the new era. Everyone has tattoos, unfortunately.”

Freedom of expression protected

Queensland Council for Civil Liberties (QCCL) Vice President Terry O’Gorman believed that although there are no protective provisions in the state’s anti-discrimination law, the Human Rights Act the Queensland man was protecting “freedom of expression, including through art”.

“There’s a wide range of people in the community who have tattoos. I’ve met a number of police officers, including police prosecutors, trades and people from all walks of life…and a number growing number of women.”

A man in a pink shirt with a red tie sits at a desk looking at papers and into the camera
Mr O’Gorman says the Queensland Council for Civil Liberties will write to the relevant authorities about the dress code practice.(ABC News: Marton Dobras)

He said dress codes that sought to ban customers with certain tattoos were sticking to “old-fashioned” views, and QCCL should write to the Office of Alcohol and Gaming Regulation (OLGR ) to draw attention to what he described as “completely illegal”. practice”.

Mr O’Gorman said the dress codes were reminiscent of hardline laws introduced as part of the Newman government’s controversial crackdown on biker gangs.

“Some authorized premises permit holders were supported by the police to prevent people with tattoos from entering because they were suspected of being associated with bikers,” he said.

Right to choose owners of places

Glen Day is a member of the Queensland Council of the Restaurant and Catering Industry Association of Australia.

The Gold Coast businessman said restaurants, clubs and pubs should have the right to enforce dress codes.

“They have to make that decision themselves and they should have the right to do so,” Mr Day said.

A man stands in front of a pancakes in paradise sign
Gold Coast restaurant owner Mr Day says business owners have the right to choose who enters.(ABC News: Alexandria Utting)

The restaurateur said he doesn’t have a no-tattoos dress code in his restaurants because they are family-friendly establishments, but high-end restaurants often ban face tattoos and neck for good reasons.

“Not everyone who has tattoos is a violent person,” he said.

“But there are some who look very aggressive with their tattoos and they do it on purpose.

“You can pick them from a mile away, usually they have some sort of chip on their shoulder and they want to be a big person and you can see that.

Job , updated

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Jägermeister Night Embassy is ready to finish what it started https://utopicstudios.com/jagermeister-night-embassy-is-ready-to-finish-what-it-started/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 16:51:45 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/jagermeister-night-embassy-is-ready-to-finish-what-it-started/ Jägermeister Night Embassy is ready to finish what it started A space for unbridled self-expression and unlimited creativity; that’s what Jägermeister’s Night Embassy promises. DormantYouth is part of the Night Embassy and Nightlife residence. Picture: Provided. JOHANNESBURG – Jägermeister Night Embassy Joburg returns to reignite the night. A space for unbridled self-expression and unlimited creativity; […]]]>

Jägermeister Night Embassy is ready to finish what it started

A space for unbridled self-expression and unlimited creativity; that’s what Jägermeister’s Night Embassy promises.

DormantYouth is part of the Night Embassy and Nightlife residence. Picture: Provided.

JOHANNESBURG – Jägermeister Night Embassy Joburg returns to reignite the night.

A space for unbridled self-expression and unlimited creativity; that’s what Jägermeister’s Night Embassy promises.

“Omicron discontinued Night Embassy and Nightlife as a whole in 2021, but now Night Embassy is back, returning with a revival party on June 15 at the Old JSE Building in Newtown. After the relaunch, the Night Embassy will give way to the two remaining night residences of Kombonation and DormantYouth,” the organizers said.

Kaofela Kaofela’s three-day residency by Kombonation was scheduled to take place on Saturday 27 and Sunday 28 November 2021 at the White House in Meadowdands, Soweto. DORMANTYOUTH’s Groove Bienalle was scheduled for December 1-4, 2021 at Megalo in Alex but a new COVID-19 variant prevented it.

READ: Night Embassy ambassadors bring Jozi to life with limitless creativity

“We’re back after carefully thinking about the safety of our communities, and making sure we have plenty of time to come back with something bigger and bolder. Through our relaunch message and visual positioning, we’re making it clear to our allies and new friends: that we’re back to bolster our unwavering support for emerging creative communities and find new directions in nightlife. “, said Jägermeister, Head of Culture and Experience in South Africa, Bea Theron.

Last year, a residency program centered on the AKA “Freiraum” space to create open applications announced for creatives from South Africa to come and showcase their visionary ideas and concepts.

“Our Night Embassy Creative Council continues to lead the way through mentorship and helping Night Ambassadors build on their creative ideas and take them from concept to creation,” Theron said.

The selected ambassadors explored new directions in nightlife culture through various art forms in hopes of fostering a strong sense of community from November 12 to December 4.

After receiving hundreds of entries and discovering some of the most visionary ideas from the creative community, the city’s boldest concepts were chosen.

“The night is calling. Join us. Night Embassy calls on our core communities to come together with us and we welcome new allies to celebrate our return at our relaunch party on June 15 at the Old JSE Building in Newtown. The former JSE building in Newtown is one of the most fascinating spaces Jägermeister has ever hosted a party in. It’s a surprising choice for our relaunch party and with its interesting internal aesthetic facades, we have no doubt we’ll start here by showcasing a new, clean way to approach new nightlife. For the Relaunch Party, each Night Ambassador was given a budget, space and given Freiraum to come up with an installation or experience that best speaks to their communities and celebrates their idea of ​​the future of nightlife. “said Theron.

These ambassadors received a major boost in their practices with the support of Night Embassy Johannesburg.

They benefit from the mentorship of Night Embassy’s creative council as well as the necessary production and infrastructure support to allow them to create new directions in Joburg’s nightlife.
Following the revival party, Night Embassy hits the streets of Soweto with Kombonation to create an elevated nightlife experience in Kasi, Kaofela Kaofela, from June 24-26.

“We are so excited to finally be back. If you think the 2021 campaign has brought you the best nights, wait until you see what we have for you this year,” said Slim Rose (AKA Kgotso Selomah) of Kombonation.

READ MORE: Kombonation adds Focalistic, Kidsuper to its Night Embassy event lineup

Market Photography Workshop graduates Kananelo Kabelo Sello and Kgotso Selomah founded Kombonation in 2018. They are a Soweto-based pre-post-production start-up specializing in real and raw visual storytelling. In addition to being a group, Kananelo and Kgotso also create clothing that showcases their photographic talents and expresses the narratives that exist within and beyond their imagery.

“I want to build architectural structures specifically for Joburg’s nightlife. I want to add interesting physical facilities to the club space as an extra layer to the excitement of going out. I think this residency will show an alternative perspective of architecture beyond its technical and formal predisposition. You can expect an installation suitable for music, performance and film, nestled in an unexpected context,” said DormantYouth AKA Thelma Ndebele.

DormantYouth AKA Thelma Ndebele is a non-binary (them/them) DJ and architect whose interest lies in music as an alternative translation of place, as well as an archive of lived space.

In 2021, Night Embassy Joburg created safe spaces, revealed new sounds and spotlighted subcultures and creative communities in Joburg’s nightlife, culminating in two events: Unmute The City by Unmuted and Queertopia by Other Village People. But it suddenly stopped when Omicron hit the world. To stay true to its mission of creating safe spaces for nightlife communities, Night Embassy has postponed the final two residencies and the closing event to 2022.

“Enjoy Jägermeister Shots and Cocktails at this evening which will feature a diverse mix of the freshest new acts and hottest established artists: DBN Gogo, Blxckie and ByLwansta, as well as sounds from the night’s ambassadors of our nighttime embassy: Unmuted, Other Village People, Kombonation, and Jeunesse Dormante. The launch party will also include a Cypher room hosted and curated by MkayFresh,” the organizers of their upcoming launch said.

Jägermeister Night Embassy Joburg said they are coming back to reignite The Night. They promise to have organized Joburg parties exploring new angles of nightlife through the incorporation of streetwear, spotlighting new music and interesting spaces and asking you and your friends to join them on their launch.

“Come and revel in Poetry Slams, Rap Battles and give the Beat Makers a chance to shine in the night! Attendees can also expect to enjoy the Night Embassy Ambassadors experiential facilities including artwork structural and conceptual and new ways to enjoy sound, such as through Unmuted’s Great North experience. Launch begins at 6:00 p.m., but partygoers are encouraged to arrive 30 minutes early for COVID-19 protocols. Thank you to present yourself with your vaccination card and an identity document. For those who have not been fully vaccinated, please note that a rapid antigen test will be maintained”.

Night Embassy 2022 Event Guide:

Relaunch Party by Night Embassy Old JSE Building, 1 Diagonal St, Newtown on June 15
Kaofela Kaofela by Kombonation in Soweto from June 24 to 26, 2022
Groove Biennial from DORMANTYOUTH to Alexandra from July 8 to 10
Night Embassy will end with a party in Moon Valley on July 16

Registrations for free tickets to all Night Embassy parties can be found here: www.night-embassy.com/jhb/

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The SENSES project teaches self-expression, creativity through music and podcasting https://utopicstudios.com/the-senses-project-teaches-self-expression-creativity-through-music-and-podcasting/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 16:52:15 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/the-senses-project-teaches-self-expression-creativity-through-music-and-podcasting/ In the basement of Steele Hall is an incredible resource that is making a difference in the lives of many university students from economically disadvantaged backgrounds. Step into the Support Services Office (OSS) – home to two opportunity programs: the Arthur O. Eve Higher Education Opportunity Program (HEOP) and TRIO Student Support Services (SSS) – […]]]>

In the basement of Steele Hall is an incredible resource that is making a difference in the lives of many university students from economically disadvantaged backgrounds.

Step into the Support Services Office (OSS) – home to two opportunity programs: the Arthur O. Eve Higher Education Opportunity Program (HEOP) and TRIO Student Support Services (SSS) – and you see a sound lab with recording studios with the latest in audio editing and mixing technology.

Students create their own music and learn to express themselves in the sound laboratory of the SENSES project.

Several floors up, on the third floor of Steele Hall, is a state-of-the-art podcast suite featuring six microphones, six headphones, and a mixer, perfect for hosting guests for the assortment of podcasts produced during the college year.

This space is much more than just recording spaces and a podcast room. It is a safe space. A diversity and inclusion project that serves as a creative outlet while supporting the mental and emotional well-being of these students.

The Studying an Environment that Nurtures Self-Exploration in Students (SENSES) project enables HEOP and SSS university students to create hip hop and electronic music, create their own beats, and host their own podcasts in a collaborative environment.

Here, students can feel free to be who they are, express how they feel, and engage in meaningful dialogue about current events.

Rolando Custodio

Rolando Custodio

“I started using the spaces as an escape to learn how to express myself, because there aren’t many spaces on campus or many people you could really be real with. Thanks to the SENSES project, I was able to start writing my own songs, producing my own music and hosting a podcast. It’s thanks to Amy. She’s the heart of this whole program, and I know there are a lot of students who are positively impacted by this program,” says Rolando Custodio, a finance and information management technology specialist who recently released his own extended play (EP) disc under the artist’s name. “Young Roley .”

Focus on mental health

The idea began when Amy Horan Messersmith, Associate Director of SSS, attended a free webinar, “Music, Wellness, and Mental Health,” on December 7, 2020. A dynamic duo of educators from Texas State University, Raphael Travis and Ray Cordero, shared how Texas State HEOP and SSS students became more confident, learned to express themselves, and saw their mental health improve thanks to an on-campus recording studio .

The SENS project

The SENS project

Messersmith pitched the idea to OSS Director Craig Tucker, outlining his vision for what would become the SENSES project – using a recording studio to help students learn about community building and self-expression while enhancing their education – and Tucker and HEOP associate director Marieke Davis immediately saw the value.

Messersmith, Tucker and Davis collaborated with David Knapp, assistant professor of music education at the Setnor School of Music with a dual appointment at the School of Education, and Joanna Spitzner, associate professor of studio arts at the College of Visual and Performing Arts on a Collaborative Grant for Unprecedented Success and Excellence (CUSE).

Their proposal received nearly $24,000 in CUSE Grant funding, and in the summer of 2021, the SENSES project was launched.

Amy Horan Messersmith

Amy Horan Messersmith

“Our students use this space to work on their mental and emotional wellbeing, and it’s an opportunity for students to get to know each other in a way that’s different from your regular classroom.” We have found that many students, especially those from marginalized populations, can come and feel like people will see them for who they are. We have a creative community where students connect with each other in a particularly meaningful way because when you create something, you share an aspect of who you are,” says Messersmith.

Focus on the process, not the product

In the recording studios and sound lab, students have the freedom to experiment with their projects, play around, try out different sounds and make mistakes.

Nick Piato is pursuing a Masters in Music Education at the School of Education and is also the Sound Lab Coordinator. While Piato assists each student with their project, instead of focusing on producing a perfect track or song, Piato quickly emphasizes the mindset of the process rather than the process. mindset of the product.

Nick Piato

Nick Piato

“If you come here with the goal of making a perfect masterpiece album, we will work with you to get you there. But really, it’s about the process of creating something, learning from your mistakes, and growing from those mistakes. We really emphasize the importance of getting better every time, and I think those are lessons that can be applied to all aspects of life,” says Piato.

When the SENSES project opened in the fall semester of 2021, Hannah Gonzalez started creating electronic music. Soon, she was developing a theme song and musical transitions for a podcast and learning to play the guitar, which Gonzalez admits is on her to-do list.

“Amy and Nick are my SSS parents. This place is really cool, and I come because I really like the community. I don’t come from a musical background and started with very minimal knowledge. But Nick taught me how to play guitar and I can play the G chord and I’m very proud of that. I’m also working on launching a podcast this summer,” says Gonzalez, a junior English student at the College of Arts and Sciences.

Growing up in New York, Edwich “Eddie” Etienne never thought he would set foot in a recording studio due to the cost of renting the space, but when his guidance counselor, Chris Davis , told him about the SENSES project, his curiosity was piqued.

Edwich

Edwich “Eddie” Etienne

After only two stints in the recording studio, Etienne, a first-year student at the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, was hooked. In collaboration with Piato, Etienne produces rhythm and blues tracks that incorporate melodic rap. In addition to creating his own music, Etienne’s time in the studio has helped him develop more confidence, and he says he’s become more comfortable with who he is.

“I’m really lucky to have this opportunity to create music and create my own sound. I may be in the studio writing music, but I’m a really quiet person. The fact that I’m being able to create music, it’s like my voice is being heard. It’s really an outlet and a great escape for me,” says Etienne.

Visit the SENSES Project online and listen to podcasts produced by the SENSES Project on SoundCloud.

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Disney Art Collections of The Lion King, Snow White, and More Coming to Arlington Museum https://utopicstudios.com/disney-art-collections-of-the-lion-king-snow-white-and-more-coming-to-arlington-museum/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 17:10:29 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/disney-art-collections-of-the-lion-king-snow-white-and-more-coming-to-arlington-museum/ Private collections of Disney art will open this month at the Arlington Museum of Art. The exhibit will feature nearly 250 original animation sketches, character studies, storyboards and concept art from Disney films, including Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, The beauty and the Beast, The Lion King, Bambi, Cinderella, The little Mermaid, Aladdin and […]]]>

Private collections of Disney art will open this month at the Arlington Museum of Art.

The exhibit will feature nearly 250 original animation sketches, character studies, storyboards and concept art from Disney films, including Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, The beauty and the Beast, The Lion King, Bambi, Cinderella, The little Mermaid, Aladdin and others.

Many pieces come from the private collection of Disney animator Andreas Deja and include works by Deja, Frank Thomas and Ollie Johnston.

Deja, who was hired by Disney in 1980, oversaw the creative development of several famous villains, including Gaston in The beauty and the BeastJafar in Aladdin and scar in The Lion King.

Arlington Museum of Art President Chris Hightower said the exhibit will provide visitors with a unique and immersive experience.

“We want Disney Art from Private Collections to fill visitors with the same kind of wonder and joy they feel for their favorite Disney movies,” Hightower said in a press release. “To create this kind of engaging experience, the museum borrows from the techniques animators use when telling a story. Throughout the exhibition, we will share stories, incorporate elements of surprise, create drama, and provide visitors with ways to interact, play, and learn.

In addition to the exhibit, the Arlington Museum of Art is planning several programs, events and activities for children and adults, including a series of Disney animated films.

An accompanying exhibition will showcase more original works by Deja, including indie projects like his upcoming short. Mushka, which tells the story of a young girl and her tiger, animated in colored pencil.

Deja said in the press release that he hopes visitors will discover that animation is a personal form of artistic expression.

“Traditional animation requires a large number of drawings in order to bring a character to life,” Deja said. “No computer will help you in this quest; it’s just you and many blank sheets of paper. The artist’s goal is not only to move the drawings, but more importantly, to move the audience.

Disney Art from Private Collections will be open June 11 through September 4 at the Arlington Museum of Art, 201 W. Main St.

Tickets are now available for purchase. General admission is $20; children 2-12 are $5; 13-18 and seniors are $15.

Arlington pools forced to cut hours due to lifeguard shortages
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Rutherford kicks off Pride Month with the borough’s first LGBTQ+ festival https://utopicstudios.com/rutherford-kicks-off-pride-month-with-the-boroughs-first-lgbtq-festival/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 23:59:00 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/rutherford-kicks-off-pride-month-with-the-boroughs-first-lgbtq-festival/ With Pride Month in full swing in New Jersey, Rutherford celebrated its first-ever LGBTQ+ festival on Saturday featuring live entertainment, food trucks, a beer garden and activities for kids. PrideFest, organized by Rutherford Pride Alliance, was held in Rutherford’s Lincoln Park and included live entertainment hosted by Harmonica Sunbeam and Honey Marie, as well as […]]]>

With Pride Month in full swing in New Jersey, Rutherford celebrated its first-ever LGBTQ+ festival on Saturday featuring live entertainment, food trucks, a beer garden and activities for kids.

PrideFest, organized by Rutherford Pride Alliance, was held in Rutherford’s Lincoln Park and included live entertainment hosted by Harmonica Sunbeam and Honey Marie, as well as musical performances by Well Strung’s Daniel Shevlin.

Rutherford Pride Alliance President Rob Lyons said increasing the visibility of the LGBTQ+ community “is more important than ever, especially for our young people”.

“Growing up, I wish I had the opportunity to see local events that provided me with a safe support system,” Lyons said in a statement Friday. “We are so honored to be able to do just that.”

The Rutherford Pride Alliance was founded in 2018 by a small group of residents to introduce members of the LGBTQ+ community to each other, “and for the benefit of all members of the community, whether they identify themselves or not. to LGBTQ+”.

The group held the first Pride Rainbow Flag Raising at Rutherford’s Borough Hall in June 2019 and has since grown to several hundred members.

“Since our initial Pride Flag raising, we have seen tremendous support from our city and have been looking forward to creating a greater celebration for Rutherford and Southern Bergen County,” Lyons said.

The festival, sponsored by American Dream Mall and Variance Films, was co-hosted by the Rutherford Arts Council, a community group established in 2019 to help foster and fund arts projects in the area. The goals of the two organizations were a perfect match, according to Katie Pippin, co-chair of RAC.

“We are delighted to partner with RPA to host South Bergen’s first Pride and Art Festival,” Pippin said in a statement. “There is so much burgeoning artistry here! Identity being intrinsically linked to artistic expression, it seemed natural to work with the Pride Alliance on this festival.

For more information about the Pride Alliance and the Saturday festival, visit RutherfordPrideAlliance.org.

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Derek Room can be attached to dhall@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @dereknhall.

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Portland Museum of Art Campus Unification + Expansion International Design Competition: Building a Landmark for the Future Call for Participation https://utopicstudios.com/portland-museum-of-art-campus-unification-expansion-international-design-competition-building-a-landmark-for-the-future-call-for-participation/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 17:03:00 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/portland-museum-of-art-campus-unification-expansion-international-design-competition-building-a-landmark-for-the-future-call-for-participation/ Portland Museum of Art Campus Unification + Expansion International Design Competition: Building a Landmark for the Future Call for Participation Aerial view of the Portland Museum of Art campus (northwest corner), circa 2010. Courtesy of Portland Museum of Art, Maine To share To share Facebook Twitter Mail pinterest WhatsApp Or https://www.archdaily.com/983052/portland-museum-of-art-campus-unification-plus-expansion-international-design-competition-building-a-landmark-for-the-future-call-to- Walk in The Portland […]]]>

Portland Museum of Art Campus Unification + Expansion International Design Competition: Building a Landmark for the Future Call for Participation