Art expression – Utopic Studios http://utopicstudios.com/ Thu, 14 Oct 2021 12:16:32 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://utopicstudios.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-3-120x120.png Art expression – Utopic Studios http://utopicstudios.com/ 32 32 Exuberant art and the cable car can only lift a poor and violent place so high https://utopicstudios.com/exuberant-art-and-the-cable-car-can-only-lift-a-poor-and-violent-place-so-high/ Thu, 14 Oct 2021 07:00:12 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/exuberant-art-and-the-cable-car-can-only-lift-a-poor-and-violent-place-so-high/ MEXICO CITY – Observed from a booming cable car, the city is a sea of ​​concrete stretching to the horizon, broken only by clusters of skyscrapers and the remains of ancient volcanoes. Some 60 feet below is the district of Iztapalapa, a maze of winding streets and alleys, its cinder-block houses blanketing the neighborhood’s tasteless […]]]>

MEXICO CITY – Observed from a booming cable car, the city is a sea of ​​concrete stretching to the horizon, broken only by clusters of skyscrapers and the remains of ancient volcanoes. Some 60 feet below is the district of Iztapalapa, a maze of winding streets and alleys, its cinder-block houses blanketing the neighborhood’s tasteless gray hills.

But then, on a roof, a sudden explosion of color: a giant monarch butterfly perched on top of a purple flower. Further along the route of the last cable car in Mexico City, a toucan and a scarlet macaw watch the passengers. Later, on a canary yellow wall, there is a young girl in a red dress, her eyes closed in an expression of absolute happiness.

The 6.5 mile line, inaugurated in August, is the longest public cable car in the world, according to the city government. As well as cutting commuting time in half for many workers in the capital’s most populous arrondissement, the cable car has an added attraction: exuberant murals painted by an army of local artists, many of whom cannot be seen. views only from above.

“There are paintings and murals all along the route,” said music teacher César Enrique Sánchez del Valle, who was taking the cable car home on a recent Tuesday afternoon. “It’s good, something unexpected.”

The rooftop paintings are the latest step in a beautification project by the Iztapalapa government, which has hired some 140 artists over the past three years to cover the neighborhood with nearly 7,000 pieces of public art, creating explosions of color in one of the Mexico City’s most criminal neighborhoods.

“People want to save their history, the history of the neighborhood,” said the mayor of the district, Clara Brugada Molina. “Iztapalapa becomes a giant gallery.

Stretching out to the outskirts of Mexico City, Iztapalapa is home to 1.8 million residents, some of the city’s poorest. Many work in wealthier neighborhoods, and before the cable car, that often meant trips of several hours.

Like many poor urban areas in Mexico, Iztapalapa has long suffered from both a lack of basic services, such as running water, as well as high levels of violence, often linked to organized crime.

The mayor’s artistic initiative is part of a larger plan to make Iztapalapa safer, including streetlights that now bathe main roads that were once plunged in darkness with light.

The murals feature national icons such as Aztec deities, revolutionary leader Emiliano Zapata and Frida Kahlo, with a touch of turquoise on the eyes.

But there are also nods to more local heroes.

Against a scarlet background with blue, yellow, teal and lime green shapes floating behind her, the image of a woman with short hair smiles at the viewer: this is Lupita Bautista, from Iztapalapa and almost world boxing champion. also colorful in real life.

One recent morning Ms Bautista, 33, walked into her gym wearing fluorescent green sneakers, a pink beanie and a rainbow tie-dye sweatshirt with her name scrawled in fuchsia sequins on the front.

“I love that the colors are so strong,” she said of the government-funded project which, in addition to creating the murals, has turned the neighborhood where she trains into a mosaic of colors. by coating the concrete block houses in bright colors, a paint job that would be unaffordable for many residents. “It gives him a lot of life. “

Ms. Bautista’s childhood story is familiar in the borough. When she was young, her home in Iztapalapa had no electricity – lit only by candlelight at night. Her neighborhood had no sidewalks or even paved roads.

“Everything was gray,” she recalls.

Crime was also a problem, with robberies and murders so common that Ms Bautista said her mother never let her or her sister leave the house unless it was to go to school.

“I was terrified,” she said. “I felt like something was going to happen to me. “

With many avenues now well lit, Ms Bautista said she felt a lot safer jogging after dark.

“I was built to run in the streets,” she said of her youth roaming the avenues and alleys of the neighborhood long before she became a fighting champion. “Now you can run with a lot more safety and concentration, without thinking about when someone is going to jump and scare you. “

But despite government efforts, most residents of Iztapalapa continue to live in fear: according to one June survey from Mexico’s national statistics agency, nearly eight in ten residents said they did not feel safe, one of the highest rates of any city in the country.

Women in particular face pervasive violence in Iztapalapa, which among the top 25 municipalities in the country for femicide, in which a woman is killed because of her sex. From 2012 to 2017, the city’s security cameras recorded more sexual assaults against women in Iztapalapa than in any other district in Mexico City, according to a 2019 report from the National Autonomous University of Mexico.

This gender-based violence is what motivated the mural and lighting project in the first place, according to the mayor: to create paths where women could feel safe returning home. Many murals celebrate women, be they residents like Ms. Bautista or famous figures from history as well as feminist symbols.

“We are trying to reclaim the streets for women,” Ms. Brugada said.

But not everyone is convinced that the strategy is working.

Daniela Cerón, 46, was born in Iztapalapa when it was just a hilly community, with open fields where farmers grew crops.

“It was like a small town,” recalls Ms. Cerón. “You used to see the beautiful hills.”

In the 1970s, the region began to urbanize rapidly.

“Any minute or another you would see a little light here, a little light there,” said Cerón. “Until the boom, it started to fill up with people.”

The growing population, both families leaving downtown Mexico City and migrants from rural areas, has also resulted in an influx of crime. For Ms Cerón, who is transgender, this meant confronting not only widespread violence, but also the prejudices of living in a conservative religious neighborhood – each year Iztapalapa attracts millions of worshipers to a giant re-enactment of Christ’s crucifixion.

“This religious stigma weighs against you,” said Ms. Cerón.

As for the murals, she says they are beautiful but haven’t done much to make her feel more secure.

“I don’t mind having a really pretty painted street if three blocks away they rob or murder people,” she said.

Alejandra Atrisco Amilpas, an artist who has painted some 300 murals in Iztapalapa, thinks they can make locals more proud of where they live, but admits they can’t go further.

“Painting helps a lot, but unfortunately it cannot change the reality of social issues,” she said. “A mural won’t change if you care about the battered woman around the corner.”

Ms Atrisco, who is gay, said she encountered conservative attitudes during the project, from male artists doubting her abilities to local officials preventing her from painting paintings LGBTQ themed murals.

“Violence against women, yes, but lesbians, no,” she said, smiling sadly.

Nonetheless, Ms. Atrisco believes her work can affect the lives of residents by portraying Iztapalapa figures in color.

“Every day you face a new challenge, every day a new wall and a new story,” she said. “You make dreams come true – you become a dream maker. “


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ANAAY hosts a week of celebration of Indigenous Peoples Day https://utopicstudios.com/anaay-hosts-a-week-of-celebration-of-indigenous-peoples-day/ Thu, 14 Oct 2021 06:03:32 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/anaay-hosts-a-week-of-celebration-of-indigenous-peoples-day/ ANAAY hosted a Zoom panel, an arts evening and a keynote speaker event in the days following Indigenous Peoples Day Anabel moore 2:00 am, October 14, 2021 Contributing journalist Alisia Pan, staff photographer In the days following Indigenous Peoples Day, students from Yale and beyond gathered at several events to discuss Indigenous experiences and share […]]]>

ANAAY hosted a Zoom panel, an arts evening and a keynote speaker event in the days following Indigenous Peoples Day


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Netflix CEO defends Dave Chappelle’s transphobia via email https://utopicstudios.com/netflix-ceo-defends-dave-chappelles-transphobia-via-email/ Thu, 14 Oct 2021 03:30:00 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/netflix-ceo-defends-dave-chappelles-transphobia-via-email/ Photo: Stacy Revere (Getty Images) Dave Chappelle’s latest comedy special, The closest, contains very sad and very harmful anti-trans comments. Faced with much criticism of his company’s decision to fund and air the special, Netflix co-CEO Ted Sarandos decided to email the entire company twice. , which only makes matters worse. When the show was […]]]>

Comedian and transphobic Dave Chappelle.

Photo: Stacy Revere (Getty Images)

Dave Chappelle’s latest comedy special, The closest, contains very sad and very harmful anti-trans comments. Faced with much criticism of his company’s decision to fund and air the special, Netflix co-CEO Ted Sarandos decided to email the entire company twice. , which only makes matters worse.

When the show was first released on Netflix, prominent trans employee and two co-workers have been suspended by the company for publicly denouncing Chappelle and then crashing at a high-level meeting (and after the public backlash was only restored a day later). Sarandos sent a memo defending Chappelle on Friday, saying, “Chappelle is one of the most popular comedians today, and we have a long-standing deal with him. His latest ‘Sticks & Stones’ special, also controversial, is our most watched, stickiest and most award-winning stand-up special yet ”.

Employees are now planning a ‘virtual walkout’ in protest, and in response to the lingering tensions, Sarandos has decided to double down and issue another note. First obtained by Variety, it reads (emphasis mine):

We know a number of you were angry, disappointed and hurt by our decision to put Dave Chappelle’s latest special on Netflix. Additionally, we have many new colleagues who want to better understand the principles that guide our team’s content choices, especially with challenging titles like this.

Our goal is to entertain the world, which means programming for a variety of tastes. This member-centric vision has fueled our growth over the past 20 years, despite all the competition, and remains Netflix’s north star today. We also support artistic freedom to help attract the best creators and fend off demands for censorship from government and others. Our Entertain the World and Strategy Bets memos, which we have debated at length, are clear on both principles – including trade-offs, that is, we will always have titles that some members and employees don’t like. not or think they are harmful.

With The Closer, we understand that the concern is not about content that is offensive to some, but titles that could increase damage in the real world (like the further marginalization of already marginalized groups, hatred, violence, etc.) Last year, we heard similar concerns about 365 Days and Violence Against Women. While some employees disagree, we have a firm belief that on-screen content doesn’t translate directly into real-world damage.

The strongest evidence to back it up is that screen violence has increased dramatically over the past three decades, especially with first-party shooters, and yet violent crime has declined dramatically in many countries. Adults can watch violence, assault, and abuse – or enjoy shocking stand-up comedy – without it hurting others. We work hard to ensure that marginalized communities are not defined by one story. So we have Sex Education, Orange is the New Black, Control Z, Hannah Gadsby, and Dave Chappelle all on Netflix. The key to this is increasing diversity within the content team itself.

In her special, Chappelle makes tough jokes about many different bands, which is her style and one reason her fans love her comedy and commentary. Comedians often bring up issues that are uncomfortable because art by nature is very provocative. As a management team, we do not believe that The Closer is intended to incite hatred or violence against anyone (in accordance with our sensitive content guidelines).

We’ve had these operating principles around our members’ enjoyment and artistic expression for many years, and the team’s decision to put The Closer on our service was consistent with them. The variety and quality of our content is what members value the most. Our hope is that you can be hugely inspired by entertaining the world, while still living with titles that you think have no place on Netflix. It won’t be the last title that has some of you wondering if you can still love Netflix. I sincerely hope you can.

-Ted

What the absolute fuck. One of the most popular comedians in the world, standing on stage and proudly saying that he is “the TERF team” (radical feminist trans-exclusionist) makes a unbelievable amount of harm. It literally does nothing but delegitimize and directly attack a whole group of marginalized people. Human being. Trying to ignore this by using anecdotal, unscientific, unrelated video game points, or using only actual physical attacks as the primary measure of “damage,” is a staggering thing to read.

Good luck to each of the 1000 employees participate in the “virtual walkout” next week.

.


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ETHS partnership provides resources for creative expression and well-being https://utopicstudios.com/eths-partnership-provides-resources-for-creative-expression-and-well-being/ Thu, 14 Oct 2021 03:13:40 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/eths-partnership-provides-resources-for-creative-expression-and-well-being/ Through partnerships with community organizations, Evanston Township High School offers students multiple opportunities to gain support and engage in mindfulness practices. Open Studio Project provides a welcoming environment to create art for personal growth, socio-emotional learning (SEL), and community well-being. Their SEL Arts Studies Program is available to ETHS students and staff throughout the school […]]]>


Through partnerships with community organizations, Evanston Township High School offers students multiple opportunities to gain support and engage in mindfulness practices.

Open Studio Project provides a welcoming environment to create art for personal growth, socio-emotional learning (SEL), and community well-being. Their SEL Arts Studies Program is available to ETHS students and staff throughout the school year in response to the COVID pandemic.

“Students learn to deal with feelings of stress and impulse control, to be more present and to be thoughtful problem solvers,” said Sarah Laing, executive director of the Open Studio Project. “The pandemic has been overwhelming on many levels. This artistic space gives them a chance to address issues of social justice, fear and anxiety, grief and sadness, among other complex feelings.

The Open Studio Project program is available on campus during lunch hours several days a week, as well as after school on Mondays and at the Wildkit Academy. Teaching artists and art therapists are on hand to help students develop a sense of belonging and connection through creative expression.

“This program offers a great way to express creative thoughts,” said freshman Connor Hill. “School day can be stressful, especially for students who may not know many others. And it’s nice to have a place to go without the pressure.

Visit the Open Studio project website for more information.


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17 years of art, expression and freedom https://utopicstudios.com/17-years-of-art-expression-and-freedom/ Fri, 08 Oct 2021 04:30:00 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/17-years-of-art-expression-and-freedom/ On the occasion of Galleri Kaya’s 17th birthday, The Business Standard interviewed its director, acclaimed artist Goutam Chakraborty 08 October 2021, 10:30 a.m. Last modification: 08 October 2021, 13:02 Since its inception, Galleri Kaya has consciously blended senior artists with relatively newer artists and brought them together under one roof. Photo: Courtesy “> Since its […]]]>

On the occasion of Galleri Kaya’s 17th birthday, The Business Standard interviewed its director, acclaimed artist Goutam Chakraborty

08 October 2021, 10:30 a.m.

Last modification: 08 October 2021, 13:02

Since its inception, Galleri Kaya has consciously blended senior artists with relatively newer artists and brought them together under one roof. Photo: Courtesy

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Since its inception, Galleri Kaya has consciously blended senior artists with relatively newer artists and brought them together under one roof. Photo: Courtesy

In 2003, when Goutam Chakraborty moved to Uttara, he thought of transforming his ground floor into a gallery.

But he also decided that the gallery was not going to be a typical gallery focusing only on exhibitions, it was going to be a creative space where artists were going to feed themselves.

The planning and interior design took about five months, after which “Galleri Kaya” began her journey. And for 17 years, he has been organizing exhibitions, workshops, art camps, art trips and much more to keep art alive and artists engaged in the country.

The Business Standard had a detailed discussion with the renowned artist, gallery owner and director of Galleri Kaya Goutam Chakraborty about the gallery’s journey over the years, the art industry in Bangladesh, the need for patrons and his plan for the future.

Goutam Chakraborty. Sketch: SCT

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Goutam Chakraborty.  Sketch: SCT

Goutam Chakraborty. Sketch: SCT

When he first opened the gallery, there were quite a few challenges. The first was its distance from other galleries or art centers such as Shahbagh and TSC.

He was worried about whether people were going to travel to Uttara to visit him. “I needed to plan something very, very unique for people to come to the gallery. So I designed the programs with that in mind.”

There were a lot of ups and downs in the beginning, but over time Galleri Kaya gained momentum and became one of the most renowned galleries in the country.

He once held a workshop on “Gajir Pot” (folk painting) at Jamuna Resort, attended by eminent artists like Qayyum Chowdhury, Kalidas Karmakar and Nitun Kundu, among others.

Image: Courtesy

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Photo: Courtesy

Image: Courtesy

“It wasn’t just a workshop, it was a lively discussion, a vibrant ‘adda’ where all these artists were drawing, talking and sharing life stories, each more interesting than the next,” Goutam explained. with us.

This is essentially what sets Galleri Kaya apart from others, she creates platforms where artists can express themselves freely.

Galleri Kaya is also hosting a 17th anniversary exhibition today, marking the centenary of the birth of the Father of the Nation and Bangabandhu, Sheikh Mujibur Rahman. The creative works of 32 modern and contemporary artists are exhibited here.

Our first question to the artist was: “Is there a big enough market for galleries to survive?”

“Not in our country. We tend to do things under manipulation; we always seek favors from each other. Art can’t thrive like that,” he replied.

According to him, those who claim to have large art collections should know that those who deal directly with art (artists, gallery owners, etc.) know more than they do.

“I was saying to a collector the other day, if you have a lot of money, you can instantly buy a lot of expensive things,” he said, adding, “But building a good art collection isn’t not easy, it takes time, and an eye for art. “

“Do we have artists who create valuable paintings? We asked him.

“We had artists like Zainul Abedin and SM Sultan. For paintings of great value, there must be people with a genuine interest in art and a lot of works of art,” he said. .

According to Goutam Chakraborty, there are not enough patrons in Bangladesh. “There is no commitment. Someone who claims to have the largest art collection in the world is not the same as patronizing art.”

Photo: Courtesy

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Image: Courtesy

Image: Courtesy

However, during his journey with Galleri Kaya, he received overwhelming support from artists. “The senior artist or the junior artist, whoever I approached, always responded warmly. ”

We then asked him to share his take on the size of the art industry in the country. “There isn’t a substantial market, so what can we call it an industry? What we have, can’t really be called an industry.”

Who are Kaya’s competitors? “I guess Galleri Kaya’s competitors are other galleries, or I am their competitor,” he replied quickly.

Since its inception, Galleri Kaya has consciously blended senior artists with relatively newer artists and brought them together under one roof.

“As an art student, as an artist’s son, I am committed to taking care of artists. Established artists don’t need gallery support, talented young people need it,” said Goutam.

He thinks that art is going through such a period where we have to break down barriers and go beyond borders. “We lack research in art, there are no good books or analyzes.”

“Simply organizing exhibitions is not enough, the art journey is long,” he said, adding: “There must be world-class exchange programs where works of art would be carefully preserved and displayed “.


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Fort Bend County Uses Artistic Expression To Encourage Youth In Incarceration | Community https://utopicstudios.com/fort-bend-county-uses-artistic-expression-to-encourage-youth-in-incarceration-community/ Thu, 20 May 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/fort-bend-county-uses-artistic-expression-to-encourage-youth-in-incarceration-community/ The paintings are the first two pieces on display in the hallways of the Fort Bend County Justice Center. Fort Bend County Judge KP George, District Attorney Brian Middleton, Executive Director of Juvenile Probation Kyle Dobbs, Juvenile Council Chairperson Judge Teana Watson, and a host of elected officials and educators from across the Fort Bend […]]]>






The paintings are the first two pieces on display in the hallways of the Fort Bend County Justice Center.


Fort Bend County Judge KP George, District Attorney Brian Middleton, Executive Director of Juvenile Probation Kyle Dobbs, Juvenile Council Chairperson Judge Teana Watson, and a host of elected officials and educators from across the Fort Bend County unveiled original artwork created in collaboration with juvenile inmates at the Fort Bend County Detention Center and Artreach, a non-profit organization that provides mentorship and artistic support to children at risk .

The paintings are the first two pieces on display in the hallways of the Fort Bend County Justice Center. The project, which is part of Fort Bend District Attorney Brian Middleton’s program to help at-risk youth, provides a creative outlet for young inmates to create their own art and collaborate as a group by giving them an outlet that allows them to express themselves constructively.

“The character of our company is determined by the way we take care of your young people and every time I visit this facility it means a lot to me,” said Justice George. “We do a number of things to empower youth and empower our children’s leadership, this is one of our number one priorities in our office.”

The program aims to increase self-esteem and help incarcerated youth overcome their past circumstances.

“We came together with the concept with a vision that our children are our future and our responsibility,” said Distract attorney Brian Middleton. “Seeing the pandemic and the impact it has had on our community, we have come together to create a safe environment for our young people to thrive. “

The county judge’s office as well as the district attorney’s office will continue to work with the juvenile detention center to display additional artwork at county facilities.

“If we are to continue to build resilient communities, we need to create a community where our young people are encouraged, and if we can do that, then they will trust us and value the community and the relationships they have,” said the Judge George. “It is our responsibility, not only as leaders of our communities, but also as elders of this village, to nurture, support and uplift these young men and women. “


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Fort Bend County and ARTreach join forces to use artistic expression to encourage incarcerated youth https://utopicstudios.com/fort-bend-county-and-artreach-join-forces-to-use-artistic-expression-to-encourage-incarcerated-youth/ Thu, 20 May 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/fort-bend-county-and-artreach-join-forces-to-use-artistic-expression-to-encourage-incarcerated-youth/ The goal of ARTreach is to provide mentorship and artistic support to children at risk. In partnership with Fort Bend County, ARTreach works to help youth inside the Fort Bend County Detention Center. Fort Bend County elected officials and educators gathered on Wednesday to unveil original works of art created by young inmates. On HoustonChronicle.com: […]]]>

The goal of ARTreach is to provide mentorship and artistic support to children at risk. In partnership with Fort Bend County, ARTreach works to help youth inside the Fort Bend County Detention Center.

Fort Bend County elected officials and educators gathered on Wednesday to unveil original works of art created by young inmates.

“The character of our company is determined by the way we take care of your youth and every time I visit this facility it is very close to my heart,” said Fort Bend County Judge KP George. “We do a number of things to empower youth and empower our children’s leadership, this is one of our number one priorities in our office.”

It is hoped that the program will help increase the self-esteem of jailed youth and help them overcome their current situation, according to a press release.

“We came together with the concept with a vision that our children are our future and our responsibility,” said District Attorney Brian Middleton. “Seeing the pandemic and the impact it has had on our community, we have come together to create a safe environment for our young people to thrive. “

Other Fort Bend County officials in attendance for the art unveiling included Executive Director of Juvenile Probation Kyle Dobbs and Juvenile Council Chairperson Justice Teana Watson.

The project is part of Middleton’s program to help at-risk youth. Together with ARTreach, it provides a “creative outlet for young inmates to create their own art and collaborate as a group by providing an outlet for them to express themselves constructively”.

The first two works of art are on display in the halls of the Fort Bend County Justice Center.

According to ARTreach, “juvenile detention centers represent our young people most at risk of dropping out of school, living on the streets, taking drugs or in prison as adults. ARTreach finds and connects juvenile justice programs that support education, enrichment and diversion of the system. The programs change the lives of many people and broaden the worldview of young people to open doors to a more positive future. Fort Bend County Juvenile Detention Center partners with ARTreach to support education, self-esteem, life skills and behavior.

ARTreach is a 501 (c) 3 non-profit organization that provides “mentoring and art-related programs to a growing population of at-risk children and others in need in the Tri-County area of Katy ”.

For more information on ARTreach, visit http://artreachtexas.org.

rkent@hcnonline.com


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Artistic expression as therapy in Xanthe’s Taupō exhibition https://utopicstudios.com/artistic-expression-as-therapy-in-xanthes-taupo-exhibition/ Mon, 14 Sep 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/artistic-expression-as-therapy-in-xanthes-taupo-exhibition/ Xanthe Wyse with some of the 30 works she created for her Speak exhibition at the Red Rock Gallery in Taupō. The exhibition opens on Saturday. Photo / Laurilee McMichael When it comes to how she feels, Xanthe Wyse lets her works do the talking. The Taupō woman uses creative expression to process and transform […]]]>

Xanthe Wyse with some of the 30 works she created for her Speak exhibition at the Red Rock Gallery in Taupō. The exhibition opens on Saturday. Photo / Laurilee McMichael

When it comes to how she feels, Xanthe Wyse lets her works do the talking.

The Taupō woman uses creative expression to process and transform trauma and express what she cannot find words for.

It is therefore fitting that Xanthe’s next exhibition at Taupō’s Red Rock Gallery is called Speak and presented as an Art as Therapy exhibition.

It follows Spinning Orbit, Xanthe’s first exhibition two years ago, where his collection of colorful artwork documented his struggles with bipolar disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder.

She was surprised and grateful that 13 of the paintings in this exhibit sold and that people didn’t just like the artwork and the concept that the artwork was quite messy because it was about dealing with emotions. They also adopted his concept of selling them for no price.

Xanthe says that when she goes into a state of hyper-arousal from her bipolar state and PTSD, the painting helps calm her down and direct her energy into something creative while also helping her to. treat his trauma.

She puts some music on a loop and says that she goes into a kind of trance, just painting by intuition.

“With my style, I go beyond actual therapy, usually on music that speaks for me and on movement because it’s the opposite of being frozen and closed … that’s why there is a lot of movement in my paintings. of dance painting. It’s very, very energizing but relaxing. I feel this incredible release that I can’t get any other way. “

Xanthe also paints when she is depressed, but says it happens less often, although she finds it helps elevate her emotions.

“Even if I just paint somewhere, I will feel an emotional shift and even cry, and then it will rise, so I don’t have long periods of depression anymore.”

Xanthe uses colors as symbolism and says that the activity of painting and symbols helps her say what she needs when she cannot find the words.

“To speak is to be unable to speak and express the trauma. I don’t speak out loud when I paint, I am silent.

“The paintings tell stories. All paintings are related to me, they are very complex on many levels. The paintings deal with my own trauma and transform it. Transformation is a key part and that’s why I use color. I paint in metaphor so that I have distance.It’s like changing and turning horrible things into something interesting.

For Speak, Xanthe has prepared around thirty works of art, mainly acrylic paintings on canvas, but also three-dimensional pieces. She describes her art as “raw and messy”.

“It’s about speaking without words and it’s an improvised expression. I’m not trying to paint a pretty picture and make it perfect, I express something from within and that’s what makes it different and interesting to people. “

Speak – Art as Therapy takes place daily from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Red Rock Gallery, 63 Raywood Cres, Ashwood Park (excluding Crown Rd), Taupō, from Saturday September 19 to Tuesday September 22. All parts are for sale, most for less than $ 100. Xanthe is grateful for the support of the Taupō District Creative Communities Scheme.


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Local Inglewood artists reflect on the importance of artistic expression https://utopicstudios.com/local-inglewood-artists-reflect-on-the-importance-of-artistic-expression/ Fri, 05 Jun 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/local-inglewood-artists-reflect-on-the-importance-of-artistic-expression/ INGLEWOOD, Calif. (KABC) – Art has long been a free medium for many purposes, but ABC7 community reporter in Inglewood, Ashley Mackey, spoke to some local artists in her community to find out why they think expression through different art forms is important. Meanwhile. Brooke Jean, an artist from Inglewood and oral creation, said artists […]]]>
INGLEWOOD, Calif. (KABC) – Art has long been a free medium for many purposes, but ABC7 community reporter in Inglewood, Ashley Mackey, spoke to some local artists in her community to find out why they think expression through different art forms is important. Meanwhile.

Brooke Jean, an artist from Inglewood and oral creation, said artists have a responsibility to tell stories.

“Expression through art is important, especially at times like these, because artists are the storytellers of our time,” said Jean.

“When you look at the art, you not only see what happened, you not only feel the emotions, but you are taught lessons. Lessons on what happened at the time,” Jean continued. . “Lessons on what you can learn from those past times, current times, and how you can put that into your future.”

Inglewood photographer and owner of TrenteTroisQuinze photography, Mikeisha Tresevant-Todd, said that she uses her art to inspire different feelings.

“We, as creatives and behind the camera, can’t just capture the moments that are happening,” Tresevant-Todd said. “But we have the ability to make people feel and sometimes the feeling can actually create a better understanding of things.”

Tyree Dillihay, from Inglewood and director of Sony Pictures Animation, said art is a universal language.

“Artists can communicate in a universal language,” said Dillihay. “Art provides another medium of communication in the form of visual, written and performing arts.”

Tracy Shields Johnson, co-owner of An artistic toast 2, a sip and paint studio in Inglewood, said it was important to find an outlet to release stress.

“We realize you have to take a break and be free from it, you have to relax,” Shields Johnson said. “You have to turn off the television, you have to find a way to deal with this and have time for ‘me’ and the way we find ourselves is going through the arts.

Neneki ‘Nick the Artist’ McGee is a visual artist and he says art is how he manages his nervous energy.

“I have the chance to create and change the narrative and direction of my life. With art, I always hope to move forward and bring people with me,” McGee said. “A lot of times when things are happening that I can’t figure it out and have no answers, I get this nervous energy and I just paint and create.”

These are just a few voices from the Inglewood community and people are encouraged to continue to reach out and share their stories and thoughts.

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Work to bring healing through artistic expression https://utopicstudios.com/work-to-bring-healing-through-artistic-expression/ Sat, 30 Oct 2010 07:00:00 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/work-to-bring-healing-through-artistic-expression/ Many artists believe that making art and being creative is therapeutic, calming the mind and relieving stress. Expressing themselves in such a universal way allows artists to connect with others on a deeper level; colors, textures and form become a language, a “soapbox”, if you will, sharing beliefs, visions of beauty, worldly concerns and memories. […]]]>

Many artists believe that making art and being creative is therapeutic, calming the mind and relieving stress.

Expressing themselves in such a universal way allows artists to connect with others on a deeper level; colors, textures and form become a language, a “soapbox”, if you will, sharing beliefs, visions of beauty, worldly concerns and memories.

Even just looking at art can evoke the latter; the things forgotten in the rush of life and the pain it often brings. Ann Walker hopes to bring a renewed sense of wholeness, life and happiness to others through her particular forms of expression.

Although Walker has never exhibited or sold her work (this is one of her goals), she is an artist who is more interested in the process than the end product.

“Creativity is a vital force. Being creative connects us to ourselves and to something bigger than ourselves at the same time, ”she said. “Creativity is a manifestation of gratitude for our lives and the world around us. At the same time, it also allows the expression of emotions that we would often prefer to avoid such as guilt, shame, sadness and anger. When we can put these emotions on paper, they no longer eat away at us from within; we can let them go.

“It’s the power of the creative process. It doesn’t matter what something looks like at the end, it’s what happens in the process of creation, the expression of emotion, the personal ideas reached. This is how creativity changes lives.

Walker, 33, graduated from Mead High School in 1995 and continued her education at Lesley University, Cambridge University, where she earned a Masters in Art Therapy and Mental Health Counseling . She graduated but not yet registered as an art therapist; she has to work a certain number of hours, which she does as a “lady of the art”, coordinator of the Arts in Healing program at the Providence Center for Faith and Healing at the Sacred Heart Medical Center and at the Hospital for children.

As the “art lady” she rolls around in the “art cart”, bringing an array of supplies to the children at their bedside or in the playrooms of the children’s ward. Whether it’s bringing a guitar to someone who doesn’t have long to live or the means for a child to express themselves through a debilitating or life-threatening illness, the rewards are immense. Walker has witnessed many instances where sadness and pain have turned into joy and pleasure through the creative process.

Walker believes in the power of the art of healing. “The artistic process reaches the non-verbal areas of the brain and allows us to express and work on aspects of our life that get in the way,” she said. “When I work with Sacred Heart patients, I can observe how the creative process increases their sense of well-being.

The Arts in Healing program is funded by donors and grants. The program is funded until April. The program has applied for several grants, including the LIVESTRONG Creative Center grant.

November is Arts in Health Month. Walker worked with Children’s Hospital artist-in-residence Nicholas Sironka on a mural project that will be hung at the hospital to celebrate and honor the creative spirit.


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