Forms of art – Utopic Studios http://utopicstudios.com/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 07:23:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://utopicstudios.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-3-120x120.png Forms of art – Utopic Studios http://utopicstudios.com/ 32 32 Robot artist performs AI-generated poetry in response to Dante | Poetry https://utopicstudios.com/robot-artist-performs-ai-generated-poetry-in-response-to-dante-poetry/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/robot-artist-performs-ai-generated-poetry-in-response-to-dante-poetry/ Dante’s Divine Comedy has inspired countless artists, from William Blake to Franz Lizst, and from Auguste Rodin to CS Lewis. But an exhibition marking the 700th anniversary of the Italian poet’s death will showcase the work of a slightly more modern enthusiast: Ai-Da the robot, who will go down in history by becoming the first […]]]>

Dante’s Divine Comedy has inspired countless artists, from William Blake to Franz Lizst, and from Auguste Rodin to CS Lewis. But an exhibition marking the 700th anniversary of the Italian poet’s death will showcase the work of a slightly more modern enthusiast: Ai-Da the robot, who will go down in history by becoming the first robot to publicly perform poetry written by its AI algorithms.

Ultra-realistic Ai-Da, which was designed in Oxford by Aidan Meller and named after computer science pioneer Ada Lovelace, received the entirety of Dante’s epic three-part narrative poem, The Divine Comedy , to read, in the English translation of JG Nichols. . She then used her algorithms, drawing on her database of words and analysis of speech patterns, to produce her own work responsive to Dante’s.

Ai-Da will perform the poems on Friday evening at the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford. Although Ai-Da is not the first AI to learn to write poetry, organizers said Friday will be “the first time that an AI robot has written and performed poetry, as a human poet would. “.

“We looked up from our worms like blindfolded captives, / Sent to seek the light; but he never came, ”writes one of his poems. “A needle and thread would be needed / To finish the painting. / To see the poor creatures, who were in misery, / That of a hawk, eyes closed.

In another, Ai-Da writes: “There are things that are so difficult – so incalculable. / Words are not intelligible to human ears; / She can only speculate on what they mean.

Meller, an art scholar, said the words and sentence structure in poetry are all AI-generated from Ai-Da’s unique AI language model, with “restricted editing.” “. “People are very wary of the fact that bots don’t do much, but the reality is that the language models are very advanced, and in 95% of cases of editing, it’s just that she has. does too much, ”he said.

“She can give us 20,000 words in 10 seconds, and if we’re going to make her say something short and sharp, we’ll choose it based on what she’s done.” But we are not the ones who write.

Meller described it as “deeply disturbing” in the way that language patterns develop. “We are going very quickly to the point where they will be completely indistinguishable from the human text, and for all of us who write this is deeply concerning,” he said.

Aidan Meller, one of the team behind Ai-Da, admits that he finds his poetry “fundamentally unsettling”. Photography: Victor Frankowski / PR

Poet Carol Rumens, commenting on Ai-Da’s verse, said she found the lines on using a needle and thread to complete the picture “very strange”, and “it would be the point where I would think the poem might fall apart, or become very experimental – but still not uninteresting ”.

“The image of the tame falcon having its eyes sewn up is close to the original and still as powerful… It has kept the best part of the passage, despite the blurring of registers and the strange orientation. The rhythm of the lines seems to flow pretty well, ”added Rumens. “I think there is hope for the robot poet.”

Meller said that while he did not view Ai-Da’s poetry as a competition with human poets, he admits that it is “fundamentally unsettling.”

“We hope that artists, poets, writers, filmmakers, etc. “he said.” This is not a matter of competition, but rather a matter of discussion and potential action.

“We should all be concerned about the widespread use of AI language models on the internet and how this will affect language and, most importantly, the creation of meaning in the future. If computer programs, rather than humans, create content that in turn shapes and impacts the human psyche and society, then this creates a critical shift in the use and impact of language – which we need to discuss and reflect on. .

The performance is part of Ashmolean’s Dante: Invention of Fame exhibition, which explores Dante’s influence over the centuries and also includes several works of art created by Ai-Da. These include Eyes Wide Shut, a response to his detention in Egypt last month; Egyptian security forces were concerned about security concerns around the cameras in his eyes. “His works reflect the power of sight and surveillance in the modern world, its tendency to arouse suspicion and the tension that this can create,” said the organizers.

Ai-Da, which was built over two years by a team of programmers, roboticists, art experts and psychologists, has previously had solo exhibitions in Oxford and the Design Museum in London, gave a TEDx talk at Oxford and did an artistic residency at Porthmeor Studios in St Ives. “I’ve always been fascinated with self-portraits to wonder what exactly you’re looking at,” she told The Guardian in May. “I don’t have feelings like humans, but I’m happy when people look at my work and say what is it? I like to be a person who makes people think.

Close-up of Ai-Da with paintings
Ai-Da owes its name to Ada Lovelace, the first computer programmer. Photography: Victor Frankowski / PR

Completed in 2019, Ai-Da has silicone skin, individually perforated hair, 3D printed teeth and gums, and built-in eye cameras. She has legs but cannot walk, but her arms, torso and head move freely.

“Her appearance was attributed by the female members of the team, who named her after Ada Lovelace – the first computer programmer in the 19th century,” Meller said. “It is hoped that it will encourage the computer programmers of today and tomorrow, who are considerably under-represented in the world.

Equally crucial is the question of why it appears human – we chose a humanoid form because although technological advancements may seem distant and abstract to us, the direct and indirect impacts on our human body are manifold, and the humanoid form Ai-Da offers an oblique reflection on this subject.


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Makaya McCraven: Deciphering the Message’s Album Review https://utopicstudios.com/makaya-mccraven-deciphering-the-messages-album-review/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 05:00:00 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/makaya-mccraven-deciphering-the-messages-album-review/ By the time Blue Note gave Makaya McCraven access to their archives to form the basis of his new album, the self-proclaimed “beat scientist” had been swimming there for years. The catalog was so central to the canon of jazz – and McCraven’s style in general – that he had worked with some tracks before, […]]]>

By the time Blue Note gave Makaya McCraven access to their archives to form the basis of his new album, the self-proclaimed “beat scientist” had been swimming there for years. The catalog was so central to the canon of jazz – and McCraven’s style in general – that he had worked with some tracks before, such as trumpeter Kenny Dorham’s 1961 hard bop track “Sunsets.” The theme persists throughout Decipher the message; McCraven not only explores Blue Note’s catalog, but his own relationship with it.

With such a sprawling collection of works, McCraven has focused on records from the ’60s and before, which helps Decipher the message maintain consistency of a single session despite extracting more than a dozen different records. Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers form the connective tissue; McCraven uses vocal samples from Blakey’s records as a de facto MC, like the “Pee Wee Marquette Ad” by A Night at Birdland, Vol. 1 or “Introduction by Art Blakey” from Around the World’s Jazz Corner, Vol. 1. And sitting in the center of his own orbit of talented contemporary musicians, McCraven spends as much of the album in conversation with Blakey – the drummer, the conductor, the mentor – as he does with his music.

During the second half of the 20th century, the Art group Blakey served as a sort of finishing school for some of jazz’s brightest young stars, providing early platforms to Lonnie Liston Smith, Terence Blanchard, to both Wynton and Branford Marsalis, and many, many more. Here, McCraven manages to assemble a virtual group of stars made up of alumni of Jazz Messenger (Horace Silver, Kenny Dorham, Hank Mobley, Wayne Shorter) and his own team of contemporary virtuosos (Jeff Parker, Junius Paul, Marquis Hill , Greg Ward). It intentionally blurs the line between samples and new recordings, between drum machines and drum kits. The result is something familiar but from another world, an album full of collaborations between young talents and old legends, some of whom have passed away long ago.

As it is collaborative, Decipher the message began as a lonely process, with McCraven digging through Blue Note’s crates on his own to build a foundation. He pulled loops and rearranged parts, then layered bass, keyboards, and drums. It mirrors the workflow of a hip-hop producer, much like J Dilla and Madlib, who are his closest contemporary analogs. He would send these sketches to friends like Parker, Paul, and Hill, who would record their parts and send them back, giving him another pass for the arrangement with fresh material informed by the originals.

There is a scholarly approach to the record, a study of nonlinear composition, and although there is infinitely more vibration here than an academic text, closer examination reveals a thesis on McCraven’s philosophy of using the recording studio as an instrument. He lingered there on the first track, inserting his own drum, bass and percussion tracks into saxophonist Hank Mobley’s 1966 song, “A Slice of the Top”. McCraven’s beats inject new energy, propelling old songs into the new millennium with a rhythmic hip-hop feel. And the vibraphone of Joel Ross, the guitars of Jeff Parker and Matt Gold, the trumpet of Marquis Hill, the bass of Junius Paul, the viola of Greg Ward and the tenor saxophones of De’Sean Jones … piercing the mix for attract attention, like the familiar intonation of Parker’s electric guitar to Kenny Dorham’s “Sunset”, which rises and falls like a horn with a screech filtered by a distortion pedal.

McCraven has carved out his own place in contemporary jazz on In the moment (2015) and Universal beings (2018), sampling her own group’s improvised sessions, then pulling, stretching and rearranging the pieces until they shape something new. And his superb recreation of Gil-Scott Heron I am new here gave a new context to the incendiary lyrics of the famous poet and musician. With each subsequent project, he continues a lifelong conversation with the music that shaped him, in turn leaving his own mark on it.

Decipher the message goes further: it blurs the line of what a “real” group is. Is it a group of people in a room or can it span over time, including both the living and the dead? McCraven said he wanted to introduce a new generation to these records which were fundamental not only to him, but also to the music itself. These artists helped draft a blueprint for how contemporary musicians improvise; hovering and swerving in and out of the pocket, but still pulled back by the gravitational pull of the rhythm section. With these improvised riffs, they forged the building blocks for an entire hip-hop wave. define a generation. Decipher the message helps connect these dots. But it also plays out as a fantasy come to life, a dream unfolding at the Blue Note, with long-lost titans beaming from the afterlife to sit with young blood, like proud parents watching their infamous children. surpass.


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Rhik Samadder Tries… Flower Arrangement: “I’m Expanding Art Form – And It Sounds Bad” | Hobby https://utopicstudios.com/rhik-samadder-tries-flower-arrangement-im-expanding-art-form-and-it-sounds-bad-hobby/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/rhik-samadder-tries-flower-arrangement-im-expanding-art-form-and-it-sounds-bad-hobby/ AAt McQueens Flower School, I try to get in the game. I don’t have the visual flair for it. Every time I make a bouquet, it always looks like it was picked from the middle of a highway. Principal tutor Christophe Berreterot, on the other hand, worked on the flowers for Meghan and Prince Harry’s […]]]>

AAt McQueens Flower School, I try to get in the game. I don’t have the visual flair for it. Every time I make a bouquet, it always looks like it was picked from the middle of a highway. Principal tutor Christophe Berreterot, on the other hand, worked on the flowers for Meghan and Prince Harry’s wedding, and now presents a crisp, hand-tied bouquet with Secret Garden roses, blue eucalyptus and cotoneaster. “The flower arrangement is a reflection of the personality,” he whispers. I watched a lot of the classic matches of the day, which in my opinion is not the required personality.

Green is good… Sophie Powell, senior teacher at McQueens Flower School, shows Rhik how to work with foliage. Photograph: Teri Pengilley / The Guardian

We learn to spiral the stems, rather than jamming them into a fist in a crisscrossing mishmash. It’s useful. Think about visual weight, balance and color, advises Berreterot. Anna, assistant today, places flowers on our individual tables and we get to work. I throw in leaves, Christmas berries, stuff that looks like Elmo the muppet’s fingers. It’s the 4-4-2 of the flower arrangement, I think. A couple of fat guys sit in the middle of the field to hold the ball, carry long boys backstage, a bit of wispy stuff up top for the highlights. Sorted.

From installations and flower walls to event dressing and fashion shoots, floristry is arguably the the art of the Instagram era, even more than short poems, or sticking out your butt. Extravagance and evanescence make flowers a luxury currency. McQueens, which has outlets in Mayfair, New York, and Seoul, still advocates for seasonal flowers. They are cheaper and last longer, while reducing air miles. They also recall that it was originally a domestic practice that anyone can try. “If you don’t know what the season is, take a look at the front gardens,” advises tutor Sophie Powell.

Ouch!  … Scrunching wire mesh in vases to hold the stems.
Ouch! … Scrunching wire mesh in vases to hold the stems. Photograph: Teri Pengilley / The Guardian

My asymmetrical bouquet is wild and loose, yet overflowing with joy, like a punk wedding. Even Berreterot is impressed. I took control of the game when I started out! Everyone’s bouquets, using the same flowers, are particularly different. Our class includes a super-yacht flight attendant, someone taking a break from a career in finance, and a critical care nurse taking a break from… well, you know. Directly in my eyes I see a living masterpiece by Ambrosius Bosschaert, already finished and hand-tied with a ribbon. It belongs to the white-haired retiree Gus, clearly an active dowser. I feel deflated.

In the afternoon, work on the vases. We put chicken wire in pots so that the mesh will hold our rods. Powell presents a sculptural “crescent moon” arrangement. The others conscientiously imitate: using the foliage to build the shape, avoiding “bald spots” or sudden drops in height. I develop the form, trying a purple side and a green side. “Do you work with groups, an almost two-tone composition?” Powell asks. More than a game of two halves I think, but don’t say it out loud. I have to admit it sounds bad. Powell skillfully transforms things, teasing the packaged buttercups, putting air between them, softening the effect with the lisianthus. “Think about negative space,” she advises, sounding like Arsene Wenger. I like to work with flowers.

Building with flowers… 'I whisper the names as I insert the flowers into place, the scent coiling in my nose.'
Building with flowers… ‘I whisper the names as I insert the flowers into place, the scent coiling in my nose.’ Photograph: Teri Pengilley / The Guardian

The material in my hands can cost several pounds per rod. How to get started in flower arranging without going bankrupt? At the florist, advises Powell, choose a focal flower that captivates you. Choose filler flowers to surround it that complement its shape and colors. Foliage is sold by weight – much cheaper than flowers and good for bulk. Keep in mind that a filler can be a focal point – it’s all relative to what else you are working with. Flowers traditionally considered less pretty, she adds, can be at the heart of the most striking arrangements. I like this attitude.

Flowers work on me too. I whisper their names as I put them in place, the scent curling through my nose. Amaranth Red Velvet. Astrantia Rome. Peach Ranunculus. Delphinium. Sounds of ancient magic. I think of my father’s garden. I think of my mother walking through Kew and the Natural History Museum, pointing to the botanist’s scrolls. I loved those delicate old sketches, the brainchild of long-dead scientists holding pencil and pastels. Bear breeches, Milkvetch, Aster, Solidaster. Anna extends a wand of blue trumpets. “Oxypetalum,” she said, sounding like Harry Potter. It seems to me that the flower arrangement is, by any other name, bewitching.

I would be replaced though, having undone Powell’s good work. My vase seems to have antlers. My net is overcrowded and there are so many leaves below the waterline that I can see Charlie Sheen wading through it with a knife between his teeth. It is a recipe for bacterial infection. These are fundamentals, and I messed them up. “How pretty! So that’s how you group together,” Gus the bell ringer says, looking over. It’s worse than I thought.

Rhik's vase arrangement… 'I'm bringing home flowers and a new tongue.'
Rhik’s vase arrangement… ‘I’m bringing home flowers and a new tongue.’ Photograph: Teri Pengilley / The Guardian

Still, it was a perfume advertisement for a day. I’m not Constance Spry, but my eyes are open. I bring home flowers and a new language. Glad I can walk into a florist and see the possibility, rather than buying ready-made bouquets. For some, the flowers will never be just bug porn or a gift of first intention. But there is musicality in this orchestration of color, form and fragrance. And philosophy. We are also flowers, born to disappear. There is a beauty and a lesson in our brevity. Rather than the war of the roses, I feel a sense of beauty and peace. Not expensive at all costs.

Some things are alive

I look at the front gardens near my house to see what is in season. Mattress, weird socks and fox poo. It’s a hell of a bouquet.

Sufficiency points

The root subjects are really fundamental. 4/5


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Lubaina Himid: “The beginning of my life was a terrible tragedy” | Lubaina Himid https://utopicstudios.com/lubaina-himid-the-beginning-of-my-life-was-a-terrible-tragedy-lubaina-himid/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 11:00:00 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/lubaina-himid-the-beginning-of-my-life-was-a-terrible-tragedy-lubaina-himid/ THEubaina Himid has waited a long time for a show at Tate Modern. She is now 67 years old and in 2017 she had the bittersweet honor of being the first black woman and oldest artist (63) to win the Turner Prize. Bittersweet because “I most certainly knew, the same way you don’t necessarily know […]]]>

THEubaina Himid has waited a long time for a show at Tate Modern. She is now 67 years old and in 2017 she had the bittersweet honor of being the first black woman and oldest artist (63) to win the Turner Prize. Bittersweet because “I most certainly knew, the same way you don’t necessarily know if you’re 45, that I had more years behind me than ahead. You might think, if you won it at 45, that you might have the same time again to try things, to fail, to try again. To live fast and loose, and have big parties. And I guess at 63, I thought, “Well, at best, I’m probably 20 years old in the making.”

We’re in Preston, the town where she’s lived since she was 36. She holds a chair at the University of Central Lancashire, and her studio, where we speak, is in a Victorian building above the Citizens Advice Bureau, right in the city center, overlooking the covered market and a stone’s throw from the majestic Harris Greek Museum. Everything is clean and white in its eagle’s nest, except for a few unfinished canvases that glow in blues, oranges and greens. On a table are dozens of tubes of acrylic paint, arranged in neat rows. Much of the floor space is taken up by an old handcart that she will use at some point to do a work; there are old wooden drawers, the insides of which she painted with men’s heads.

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Wasn’t the victory a huge boost, I ask? “Of course that is what happened,” she said. “I was like, ‘Do I have time to be this brave and exciting? And then I realized I had to do it. And it was fabulous. The real turning point, she says, was captured by a London gallery, Hollybush Gardens, in 2013. Until then, she had been working steadily and successfully, exhibiting regionally, but without recognition by major metropolitan institutions. Everything has changed now, and since that victory his international reputation has also grown, with exhibitions at Wiels in Brussels and at the New Museum in New York. For the big one, at Tate Modern, she’s eagerly trying to “break the rules,” she says – it’s no easy task. Right now, she is faced with the paradox that once a work leaves her studio and enters the museum, it ceases to be provisional – something that she manipulates, modifies, repaints – and becomes a precious artefact. “You mean, ‘It’s just art, it’s okay.’ But they treat him with incredible respect. And then maybe the public will be reckless with that. But I believe in the public a lot. I try to do this show so that the viewer thinks they are the most important person in the room.

Jelly Mold Pavilion for the Folkestone Triennial. Photograph: Colin Walton / Alamy

The entire exhibition is conceived as a stage set, in which you, the visitor, are the protagonist – complementing the works with your presence, just as a play exists in its truest form when it is animated by actors in front of an audience. There will be a sound element in the show, composed by her close friend and collaborator, Magda Stawarska-Beavan, bringing out the sound she feels implicit in her work – “It’s just that these are paintings”, says- her reasonably, “so you can’t hear it. She points to a canvas she’s working on, a large scene of two women on the deck of a ship.” The sea makes noise, doesn’t it? The birds make noise, the boat creaks… ”

Himid’s work deliberately invites you to do so. There is always an invitation for you to get on the deck of the boat, to join in the fun; or, if it is a work such as The Operating Table, in which three seated women seem to be debating how to design a city, you will find that Himid has left room for you to join them at their table. The works show dramatic moments, but not in a grandiloquent sense: no Chekhovian pistol is introduced into his paintings which must, of necessity, explode. Rather, she shows us the little gestural dramas of everyday life, encounters like the ones she sees playing out in front of her studio window. (“Scenes from Dickens or Hogarth, if you’re in Preston: all life is here.”) Her paintings feature “private moments in public places,” she says. The small decisions and the minor negotiations on which entire lives could be hung.

Conversation is often the key: Outside of her groups of capable women, she often paints male dandies, each “trying not to be the most dominant man in the room.” She points out that in art history, men are often depicted either owning or dominating something: her work is, she says, “much more interested in the way people are; people, that is to say, who do not often get painted. The men who have market stalls, or the men who play dominoes, or the man who has just cooked while the others are eating. There is drama in everyday life, in moments that seem insignificant. “

Much of this dramatic impetus comes from his early theatrical training. Himid’s British mother met her father, who is from Zanzibar, when they were students. They settled together on the Tanzanian archipelago, but her father, a teacher, died of malaria soon after Himid was born. “The start of my life,” as she bluntly puts it, “was a terrible tragedy”. Her mother – who herself died last year at the age of 92 – brought her four-month-old baby to the UK and settled in London. She was a textile designer, who passed her eye for the pattern on to her daughter, and often took the teenager Himid to museums and department stores (both, in their own way, from 19th-century temples to material culture). ).

Door sculptures for Frieze 2020.
Door sculptures for Frieze 2020. Photograph: Waldemar Sikora / Alamy

Himid remembers seeing Bridget Riley’s 1968 painting Late Morning on one of those trips, in the Tate Gallery, hanging behind sculptures by Giacometti. (“I objected to them using the Bridget Riley, it seemed to me, as a backdrop for the Giacometti.”) Can manipulate you in such a way that you want to watch, and then you can’t watch – like, ‘Come here… then fuck you.’ These are the kinds of works that really taught me what painting can do.

Nonetheless, she was drawn to studying theater design rather than fine art – though it was rather a disappointment for her, with her teachers invested in the velvet and gilding world of ballet and opera instead. that in the more political and European theater that she was excited by. (She would love to work with a stage designer now, she says, to create sets for an opera or a play.) After college, she did a bit of this and that – waitress, working in restaurants. galleries and designing restaurants. It was in catering spaces that she began to set up exhibitions of her work and that of her peers. “I knew absolutely from a young age that Africans, blacks, made art, but all around me they were telling me we didn’t do it,” she says.

Eventually, in the 1980s, she completed an MA in Cultural History at the Royal College of Art and researched other black and Asian artists. “And of course they were working all over the country: Eddie Chambers, Chila Kumari Singh Burman, Sonia Boyce, Veronica Ryan, Sutapa Biswas… several of us brought these people together in different ways and started putting on shows.”

These artists of color and others, like Himid herself, have recently found themselves in the limelight, with prominent exhibitions and projects; Sonia Boyce, for example, will represent the UK at the Venice Biennale next year; Last winter, Berman illuminated the facade of Tate Britain with a light installation. “They have always been quality artists,” says Himid. “I think some people might say, ‘Oh, we’re showing them now because now they’re really good. Yes, but even I who didn’t have a degree from Courtauld could tell they were really good 30 years ago.

Swallow Hard: The Lancaster Dinner Service, 2007.
Swallow Hard: The Lancaster Dinner Service, 2007. Photograph: David Levene / The Guardian

Himid worries that this current prominence is a fashionable moment, rather than solid progress, but she also thinks “it’s very good that a lot of these artists who were in their twenties in the 1980s are being seen by younger people. [Black and Asian] artists to be still doing it. I think, however, that young artists also think, “Yeah, whatever. I can do something more interesting, better, more experimental, more dynamic. ‘ I hope that now there is no stopping this momentum.

Himid wants his exhibition to be a meeting place, a place where action can begin. This is what attracted her to the theater in the first place: “It seemed like it was a place where you can make things happen, where things change, costumes change, sets change, places change, places change. emotions change. When his work is on display at Tate Modern, you will be able to see the backs of his life-size painted cutouts, appreciate the fact that his work is often made from humble objects, transformed from everyday pieces (boxes , old boxes, pieces of wood, old dressers). His work shows – and takes pleasure in – his own artifice. “What I want,” she said, “is for people to see that you can, for example, turn a jelly mold into a model for a pavilion, or you can put a chair on the back of a cutout for a pavilion. make her stand up. In fact, the ability to move something from this to that is possible. “

And that kind of change, she suggests, could replace – or be part of – an ability to create larger change. ” It is not easy ; it is not easy to make a table, it is in fact very difficult. But it is possible to change something about yourself or your environment or the world. I want people to think, “If she can do it, then it must be possible for me to do it too.” “

Lubaina Himid is at Tate Modern, London, in Thur until July 3, 2022.


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Archaeologists Dig Up Detroit Museum Site: Here’s What They Found https://utopicstudios.com/archaeologists-dig-up-detroit-museum-site-heres-what-they-found/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 11:05:11 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/archaeologists-dig-up-detroit-museum-site-heres-what-they-found/ Pieces of a clay pot. An old medicine bottle. These random household items, picked from the grounds of the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit (MOCAD) by detectives from Wayne State history, will be turned into works of art. MOCAD has partnered with the Department of Anthropology at Wayne State University to conduct an excavation of […]]]>

Pieces of a clay pot. An old medicine bottle.

These random household items, picked from the grounds of the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit (MOCAD) by detectives from Wayne State history, will be turned into works of art.

MOCAD has partnered with the Department of Anthropology at Wayne State University to conduct an excavation of the museum grounds as part of an ongoing art exhibit titled “All the Monsters” by Chicago-born Jan Tichy .

The exhibit is located in Mike Kelley’s “Mobile Homestead”, a life-size replica of Kelley’s 1950s ranch-style home in Detroit. Kelley, who died in 2012, has worked with various media and is considered one of Detroit’s most influential artists. He requested that the rooms on the ground floor of the house be used as a community gallery and gathering space.


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New book features the English alphabet as an eye-catching art history guide https://utopicstudios.com/new-book-features-the-english-alphabet-as-an-eye-catching-art-history-guide/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 10:08:37 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/new-book-features-the-english-alphabet-as-an-eye-catching-art-history-guide/ The annual Internet Challenge, 36 Days of Type, finds new iterations each year as a global community of designers and artists discover innovative ways to showcase the English alphabet and numbers. Where some turn to food items, cartoon characters and quilling paper to create the alphabet, for Chennai-based Arvind Sundar, 28, is art history. In […]]]>

The annual Internet Challenge, 36 Days of Type, finds new iterations each year as a global community of designers and artists discover innovative ways to showcase the English alphabet and numbers. Where some turn to food items, cartoon characters and quilling paper to create the alphabet, for Chennai-based Arvind Sundar, 28, is art history.

In early 2020, Sundar created a mix of art history and typography for 36 Days of Type. The alphabet takes the signature styles of famous artists from the 14th to the 21st century, mainly from Europe and America. The letter A takes the form of the portraits of Giuseppe Arcimboldo, for example. Arcimboldo, a 16th-century Milanese painter, was himself a master of mash-ups, painting human heads as assemblages of fruits, flowers and vegetables. A pear stands out in the nose and onions in red cheeks. In Sundar’s series, the typeface for the letter A pays homage to Arcimboldo, and is made entirely of fruit.

The artists selected in this art history primer were based on Sundar’s personal favorites – he calls Pollock and Marin his polestars – and because their last names match the alphabet.

The ink series is now available as a book, titled Typography of art history (Rs 2,400, available at http://www.floatingcanvas.co). It is formatted like a children’s book, with the alphabet on one side and the representative object on the other, such as A for Apple or P for Pot. Here, A is Arcimboldo and P is Jackson Pollock, with selections of their art presented as objects.

Sundar says he chose this format because he sees it not only as a table book but also as an educational tool, as “a door to the history of art”. Sundar graduated with a Masters of Fine Arts from the University of Cincinnati in 2018, and is a painter and designer with a keen interest in geometry, calligraphy, and typography. Having taught at Loyola College in Chennai for a few years, he says: “I don’t see any formal art education in India, especially when it comes to art history. In the United States, I’ve seen kindergarten teachers take kids to art museums. We don’t have it here. I wanted to generate some interest in adults and children. He cites the example of the letter U for Paolo Uccello, and hopes his audience will be compelled to learn more about one of the first painters of the Italian Renaissance, known for his obsession with perspective.

Art History Typography, Arvind Sundar Art History Typography, 36 Days of Type Art History Typography Sundar says he chose this format because he sees it not only as a table book but also as an educational tool, as “a door to the history of art”.

The book includes other great artists, such as Georgia O’Keeffe, Frida Kahlo, Andy Warhol and Salvador Dali. Sundar’s typographical interpretations present the legacy of these artists in a nutshell. Some, like M for Agnes Martin, the American abstractist of the twentieth century, are particularly innovative. Sundar says, “With Agnes Martin, it was the gates. As a painter, I am largely inspired by grids. I wanted to have a strong influence on the grid in the book and that’s why I chose Martin.

The artists selected in this art history primer were based on Sundar’s personal favorites – he calls Pollock and Marin his polestars – and because their last names match the alphabet. If the public is looking for an edition showcasing Indian art history, they won’t be disappointed to learn that Sundar has one in the works.

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Legacy of Influential Artist Charles White Awarded New Fellowship at Otis College of Art and Design in Los Angeles https://utopicstudios.com/legacy-of-influential-artist-charles-white-awarded-new-fellowship-at-otis-college-of-art-and-design-in-los-angeles/ Thu, 11 Nov 2021 02:59:02 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/legacy-of-influential-artist-charles-white-awarded-new-fellowship-at-otis-college-of-art-and-design-in-los-angeles/ A NEW CHARLES WHITE Art and Design Scholarship at the Otis Art College of Art and Design in Los Angeles provides students from under-represented groups with full scholarships for four years. The scholarship honors the legacy and influence of Charles Blanc, a master designer recognized for his powerful and realistic images of blacks that capture […]]]>

A NEW CHARLES WHITE Art and Design Scholarship at the Otis Art College of Art and Design in Los Angeles provides students from under-represented groups with full scholarships for four years. The scholarship honors the legacy and influence of Charles Blanc, a master designer recognized for his powerful and realistic images of blacks that capture their strength, dignity and beauty.

The famous artist and beloved faculty member taught Otis from 1965 until his death in 1979, inspiring many students who became notable artists including David Hammons, Kerry James Marshall, Suzanne Jackson, Ulysses Jenkins, Kent Twitchell, Judithe Hernandez, Richard Wyatt and Alonzo Davis.


Charles White painting a mural Mary McLeod Bethune, 1978. | © The Charles White Archives, photo by Frank J. Thomas

The annual scholarship is funded in part by a donation of $ 10 million from Mei-Lee Ney, chair of the board of directors of Otis College, and established in cooperation with the artist’s son, C. Ian White, and the Charles White Archives.

“We are extremely grateful to Mei-Lee for her generous donation and shared commitment to the important diversity, equity and inclusion work of Otis College and to Ian White for partnering with us to celebrate the work. and his father’s legacy, ”said Otis College President Charles Hirschhorn. when the stock market was announced yesterday.

Ney is President of Richard Ney & Associates Asset Management Inc., which she helped lead in partnership with her late husband, Richard.

“It is an honor to provide under-represented students access to art and design training at Otis College, an institution close to my heart. Charles White has opened the door to so many diverse artists with his hard-hitting work and teaching, and it’s wonderful to continue that legacy with this new scholarship, ”Ney said in a statement.

“It is an honor to provide under-represented students access to art and design training at Otis College, an institution close to my heart. Charles White has opened the door to so many diverse artists with his hard-hitting work and teaching, and it’s wonderful to continue that legacy with this new scholarship. – Mei-Lee Ney

Last year, Ney gave Otis $ 1 million to support the creation of a leadership position dedicated to the college’s equity, diversity and inclusion (DEI) strategy. His donation of $ 10 million dedicated to the Charles White Scholarship is among the largest donations Otis has ever received.

Next spring, the inaugural scholarship will be awarded to a new freshman art and design student from an underrepresented Los Angeles County group, who will join Otis in the fall of 2022. In 2023, the scholarship will be joining Otis. will expand, providing opportunities for two under-represented each year. students – one from Los Angeles County and one from anywhere in the United States.

“This scholarship program offers a young artist the opportunity to explore their creative gifts. Charles White was twice denied scholarships to pursue his artistic interests as a young adult purely because of his pigmentation. As an established artist, he was even refused entry to see his own work due to its pigmentation. I appreciate Mei-Lee’s generous donation for her recognition of White’s contribution and recognition of the lack of students of color in arts institutions, ”said artist, author and educator C. Ian White, who oversees the Charles White Archives.

“Generations of students have been impacted by Charles White’s presence on the Otis campus, who have been and continue to be huge and full contributors to the arts and their communities. This scholarship will be a way for young creatives to enter the arts and build a more inclusive cultural landscape. “

“Charles White has twice been denied scholarships to pursue his artistic interests as a young adult purely on the basis of his pigmentation… I appreciate Mei-Lee’s generous donation for his recognition of White’s contribution and recognition of the lack of students of color in arts institutions. “
– C. Ian White

Among the many emotional and motivated white students, Hammons, the acclaimed conceptual artist, is. He attended Otis from 1968 to 1972. The college shared Hammons’ following reflection on his experiences in the White’e class:

“I stayed in this class for a long, long time. But you know it was more about being with a pro, it was like being in the room with [Muhammad] Ali. Or James Baldwin. Just be in this room with that kind of confidence [that kind of] honesty is what was really going on. Everything I drew didn’t really matter. Spirit, energy and dignity were. CT

BOOKSHELF
The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) and the Art Institute of Chicago have co-published a fully illustrated exhibition catalog to accompany “Charles White: A Retrospective”. The volume features contributions from exhibition curators, academics and artist Kerry James Marshall. Also consider “Charles White: Gordon’s Gift to the University of Texas” and “Grandpa and the Library: How Charles White Learned to Paint,” a children’s book by C. Ian White. “Charles White: Black Pope” was published on the occasion of “Charles White — Leonardo da Vinci”, the MoMA presentation hosted by David Hammons. “David Hammons: Body Prints, 1968-1979” accompanied the artist’s recent exhibition at the Drawing Center in New York.

TYPE OF SUPPORT CULTURE
Do you like and appreciate the type of culture? Please consider supporting its current production by making a donation. Culture Type is an independent art history project that requires countless hours and expense to research, report, write, and produce. To help maintain it, make a one-time donation or sign up for a recurring monthly contribution. It just takes a minute. Thank you very much for your support.



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An Ancient Art Form: Enamel Painting on Luxury Watch Dials | The Singapore peak https://utopicstudios.com/an-ancient-art-form-enamel-painting-on-luxury-watch-dials-the-singapore-peak/ Tue, 09 Nov 2021 04:23:57 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/an-ancient-art-form-enamel-painting-on-luxury-watch-dials-the-singapore-peak/ FROM HISTORYJaeger-LeCoultre shares the stories of great paintings lost and found through its new Reverso watches. The blank case back of the Jaeger-LeCoultre Reverso’s rotating case has long offered an endless canvas for artistic expression, with engraved messages as well as enamel miniatures. The watch itself debuted in 1931, while the first known Reverso with […]]]>

FROM HISTORY
Jaeger-LeCoultre shares the stories of great paintings lost and found through its new Reverso watches.

The blank case back of the Jaeger-LeCoultre Reverso’s rotating case has long offered an endless canvas for artistic expression, with engraved messages as well as enamel miniatures. The watch itself debuted in 1931, while the first known Reverso with an enamel painting – the portrait of an Indian woman – dates back to 1936, five years later.

(Related: TAG Heuer Enlists Ryan Gosling To Launch Latest Generation Carrera Timepiece)

Following a series of other Reverso launches during the model’s 90th anniversary year, Jaeger-LeCoultre recently unveiled the Reverso Tribute Enamel Hidden Treasures, a trio of fine craft watches featuring replicas of paintings that the we thought long lost but found later.

Speaking to The Peak via a video presentation in August, CEO Catherine Renier said: “We saw these paintings as a way to pay homage to the revelation that the Reverso provides. By turning the case over, we discover the work of art below.

Limited to 10 pieces each, the Hidden Treasures were made in grand feu enamel at the Atelier des Métiers Rares of Jaeger-LeCoultre. The reproductions pay homage to three masters: Gustave Courbet (View of Lake Geneva, 1876), Vincent Van Gogh (Sunset at Montmajour, 1888) and Gustav Klimt (Portrait of a Lady, 1917).

While the stories behind these works of art are all compelling enough to warrant a novel (or at least a short story), the legend of Klimt is the most intriguing. It is the only known “double” portrait of the Viennese artist and it has been “lost” twice. While Portrait of a Lady dates back to 1917, Klimt painted it over an earlier image of a woman who was said to have been his prematurely deceased muse. The fact that this is a double painting was not discovered until 1996.

In February 1997, Portrait of a Lady was stolen from an Italian art gallery, where it had been on display since 1925. Over the following years, several forgeries emerged. Then, in December 2019, gardeners discovered the original, hidden in a black bag, inside a recess in the wall of the same gallery. Quite the exciting conversation-starter to exercise on your wrist.

UNIQUE ACHIEVEMENT
Vacheron Constantin’s latest bespoke piece is a masterpiece inside and out.

Dedicated to the creation of unique pieces for its best clients, Les Cabinotiers de Vacheron Constantin is at the origin of several of the house’s most astonishing horological and artistic blockbusters. Its latest unique creation, Les Cabinotiers Westminster Sonnerie – Homage to Johannes Vermeer, is the result of eight years of interaction between the collector who commissioned it and the Geneva watch manufacturer.

(Related: Patek Philippe Launches New Versions Of Three Of Its Complicated Chronographs)

On the officer-style caseback of this 98mm yellow gold pocket watch is a miniature reproduction of Johannes Vermeer’s painting Girl with a Pearl Earring, dating from 1665. Anita Porchet, a renowned enameller, put seven months to research and complete it. As challenges well known to aficionados of grand feu enamel, multiple fires at high temperatures can cause color changes or cracks and even warp the metal base. Only the black background of the image required seven different shades.

The art of engraving also occupies a prominent place. Made for five months by a master engraver from Vacheron Constantin, it showcases acanthus leaves running along scrolls and flowers with a pearl heart. The work of the engraver is also the icing on the cake of this timepiece. Carved from a block of gold, the arch is flanked by roaring lions.

The watch is also impressive on the inside. The new caliber 3761 was developed by the team behind the 2015 Vacheron Constantin 57-complication pocket watch 57260 and features Grande and Petite Sonnerie ringing complications and a minute repeater coupled with a Westminster chime mechanism. with five gongs and five hammers. A tourbillon regulates the manual winding movement in 806 components with a dual wheel system to ensure smooth movement of the extra-long seconds hand.

NEWS TABLE
Miniature enamel painting takes center stage in Patek Philippe’s latest Rare Handcrafts collection.

Patek Philippe’s sports watches may be making headlines these days, but true fans of the brand know it has a lot more to offer, including its focus on the decorative arts. In June, the luxury watch company hosted an exhibition at its historic headquarters in Geneva, showcasing more than 75 watches and clocks from its latest Rare Handcrafts collection.

Unique or limited-edition pieces showcase a range of artisan crafts, including engraving, grand feu cloisonné enamel, miniature enamel painting, guillochage, setting and wood microarquetry. A Geneva specialty since the 17th century, miniature painting on enamel figures prominently among these novelties – particularly on the backs of pocket watches and the dials of wristwatches. Using microscopic binoculars, the artisans use tiny paintbrushes to apply the pigments, which are mostly powdered metal oxides.

Patek Philippe frequently depicts flora and fauna in his miniature paintings, and one of them is on display in the Golden Ellipse watch. Known as the Roman Garden, it reproduces a fresco discovered in an imperial villa of the 1st century BC.

Initially, the craftsman applied two coats of white enamel which required three firing. In the next step, he used 12 basic colors and a variety of mixtures to paint the plants and the bird, which he drew several times. Then, using a traditional Geneva method, five coats of a transparent enamel called flux were applied, and each required baking. After that, the surface was ground, glazed and polished.

Make no mistake about it: there is a lot more to it than what you see with arts like these.

(Related: Audemars Piguet Adds Sparkling Color to Its Royal Oak Concept Flying Tourbillon)


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An art form that radically altered thinking and aesthetics through the expression of truth https://utopicstudios.com/an-art-form-that-radically-altered-thinking-and-aesthetics-through-the-expression-of-truth/ Sun, 07 Nov 2021 05:34:00 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/an-art-form-that-radically-altered-thinking-and-aesthetics-through-the-expression-of-truth/ In his 2013 memoir Levels of Life, English Booker Prize-winning writer Julian Barnes places photography as the first of the three supreme emblems of modernity at the beginning of the 19th century, the other two being electricity and aeronautics. Recounting the adventurous shot of earth from the sky by French balloonist Gaspard-Félix Tournachon, Barnes says […]]]>

In his 2013 memoir Levels of Life, English Booker Prize-winning writer Julian Barnes places photography as the first of the three supreme emblems of modernity at the beginning of the 19th century, the other two being electricity and aeronautics. Recounting the adventurous shot of earth from the sky by French balloonist Gaspard-Félix Tournachon, Barnes says the photograph was sudden, contemporary art which achieved technical excellence very quickly, as Jazz.
Almost two centuries after French inventor Joseph Nicéphore Niépce took the first photograph in history, the world is preparing to celebrate the moment of triumph. Two major exhibitions in the nation’s capital were devoted to photography, an art form that radically altered thinking and aesthetics through the expression of truth. The first, “Unsealed Chamber, The Transient Image”, was performed by Aparna Nori, Arpan Mukherjee, Indu Antony and Philippe Calia. The second, “In Search of Ancient India,” was a solo exhibition by Scottish historian and writer William Dalrymple.
Installed at the Romain Rolland gallery of the Alliance française in Delhi, Unsealed Chamber marked the 195th anniversary of the invention of photography by Niépce. The works of the artists presented drew heavily on the photographic processes used in the 19th century to create a nostalgic connection with the community of the first practitioners of the art. Works of art have also been influenced by the explosion of technology in the 21st century and the pressures brought about by the pandemic.
“I wanted to slow down,” says Bengaluru artist Antony, reflecting on the painstakingly slow salt-paper printing method used to make his 28 photographic works, titled “Ivar”. The salted paper printing technique, invented by British scientist William Henry Fox Talbot in 1835, takes eight hours to make an impression. “The prints were created during the second wave of Covid-19. I was filled with anxiety during this time and the printmaking became a meditative process, ”adds Antony. Her exhibited works were prints of photographs of women collected from thrift stores and kabadiwalas over a decade.
Nori, who like Antony used the salted paper printing method, combined digital and analog photography in his works. “It’s a personal project. I made images of myself digitally and in the engraving process I used the salted paper technique, ”explains Nori. Each of his 15 works at the exhibition, from the ‘Nalla Pilla’ series, was a starting point for talking about the body as a site of experience. “It’s a way of exploring how to externalize these experiences. “
Santiniketan-based artist Arpan Mukherjee used 19th-century calotype and cyanotype photography techniques for his works, titled “Gola Vora Dhan” (meaning your grain storage is full). “I think the old ways of photography have a lot to offer,” he says. Invented in the 1840s, the calotype was the first photographic process in which the idea of ​​a negative was used.
“It was also the method primarily used by colonial photographers to document India. All of the important monuments, including the Taj Mahal, were clicked multiple times using this process, ”adds Mukherjee. French artist Philippe Calia questions the medium of photography in his series ‘The Shape of Clouds’. His inkjet prints on natural paper were images from Google Earth that challenged the current technological regime of digital imaging and cloud storage. “We delegate memory to machines. Machines increase our memory capacity, but it also reduces our memory capacity, ”adds Calia, who lives in Bangalore. “Ultimately, we need a balance; maybe not everything needs to be recorded.
“In Search of Ancient India” at the Vadehra Art Gallery marked the first stop on Dalrymple’s travels to India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka for his new book, The Golden Road, which aims to record artistic achievements and cultures of ancient India between 200 BC. and 1200 AD. “I am still continuing the research, which has been delayed by the pandemic,” explains Dalrymple. “I hope to start writing early next year and finish by the end of the year.”

Window view

French inventor Joseph Nicéphore Niépce, in 1827, after several unsuccessful attempts, successfully used a camera obscura to capture an image from the window of his house in eastern France.
The image titled “View from the Window” is the oldest photograph in history.
His first photograph on an unengraved pewter plate gave the world a new art form.


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Time, type of arts education in local schools | New https://utopicstudios.com/time-type-of-arts-education-in-local-schools-new/ Fri, 05 Nov 2021 20:14:00 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/time-type-of-arts-education-in-local-schools-new/ EDITOR’S NOTE: A similar story about middle and high schools will appear in Monday’s edition. The Kentucky Department of Education standards “incorporate the five artistic disciplines of dance, media arts, music, drama and visual arts,” according to the KDE website. “Schools are encouraged to provide their students with rigorous arts programs that emphasize the four […]]]>

EDITOR’S NOTE: A similar story about middle and high schools will appear in Monday’s edition.

The Kentucky Department of Education standards “incorporate the five artistic disciplines of dance, media arts, music, drama and visual arts,” according to the KDE website. “Schools are encouraged to provide their students with rigorous arts programs that emphasize the four artistic processes of creation, performance / presentation / production, response and connection. “

The report card data released annually by KDE provides a list of opportunities in the arts as well as the teaching minutes students receive per week in the arts. These data are broken down by school for each of the five categories. It is important to note that elementary and secondary schools with middle-level students are always classified according to the name of the school.

Primary schools

“The visual and performing arts curriculum at the elementary and middle school levels focuses on exploring the art forms of dance, media arts, music, drama and visual arts. The emphasis should be on exposing students to a variety of arts through active experiences in the five art forms, ”according to KDE.

At the elementary level, schools in the area range from 40 minutes to 1,080 minutes of arts instruction per week. Eleven elementary schools offer minutes of dance instruction, eight of drama lessons, and 15 minutes of media arts instruction. Thirty-one elementary schools offer music instruction minutes and 33 visual arts instruction.

It should be noted that the range of teaching minutes changes if we consider only those which only have elementary-level students. The range goes from 40 to 225 minutes of instruction. Two outliers are Blaine Elementary and Fallsburg Elementary in Lawrence County, which educate students through eighth grade.

All but eight schools distribute teaching minutes among each of the offerings equally, with three schools providing 100% teaching minutes in one of the five disciplines, three schools providing equal access to all five schools, and five schools distributing the minutes also between three disciplines. Fourteen schools share the time 50/50.

Those that only offer one discipline are Argillite, McKell and Wurtland Elementary Schools, all located in Greenup County. Each offers music lessons. Argillite and Wurtland provide 45 minutes of instruction and McKell provides 40 minutes in the area.

All but one of the schools, dividing time equally between two disciplines, devote time to music and the visual arts. Oakview is the only one to offer a different combination, dividing its 90 minutes between dance and music.

Fairview Elementary has the highest number of instructional minutes split between music and visual arts with 160 minutes in total. Laurel Elementary (Lewis Co.) shares 110 minutes between the two and Louisa East (Lawrence Co.) shares 100 total teaching minutes for music and visual arts.

Star Elementary (Carter Co.) and Campbell Elementary (Raceland-Worthington) spend 90 minutes with an equal split of music and visual art. Caltettsburg Elementary (Boyd Co.), Carter City Elementary (Carter Co.), Heritage Elementary (Carter Co.), Louisa West Elementary (Lawrence Co.), Olive Hill Elementary (Carter Co.) Russell-McDowell Intermediate (Russell) and Tygart Creek Elementary (Carter Co.) uniformly distributes 80 minutes of visual arts and music instruction each week.

Two schools are approaching a 50% split. Tollesboro Elementary (Lewis Co.) spends 115 minutes in total with 52.17% in visual arts and 47.83% in media arts. Lewis County Central devotes 53.13% of schools to 96 minutes of total instruction in music and 46.87% in visual arts.

The five schools offering an equal distribution of three artistic disciplines are Charles Russell Elementary (Ashland), Crabbe Elementary (Ashland), Elliott County Intermediate, Poage Elementary (Ashland) and Prichard (Carter Co.). Prichard and Elliott County Intermediate offer dance as an additional artistic experience, and all three elementary schools in the Ashland Independent School District offer media arts.

Three elementary schools offer all five disciplines with an equal percentage of 20% for each category. These schools are in the top five for greatest teaching minutes. Fallsburg Elementary (Lawrence Co.) offers 450 total instructional minutes, Summit Elementary (Boyd Co.) offers 225 total instructional minutes, and Cannonsburg (Boyd Co.) offers 150 total instructional minutes.

Blaine Elementary (Lawrence Co.) is the only other elementary to offer all five disciplines, but devotes more time to some disciplines. The school devotes 50% of its 1,080 teaching minutes to music, 16.66% to visual arts and dance, and 8.33% to media arts and theater.

Elliott County Elementary School places more emphasis on the visual arts and dance with 42.86% of the school’s total 140 minutes spent in each discipline. The school devotes the remaining 14.28% to media arts.

Other schools focus on music and the visual arts while adding time in other areas.

Greysbranch Elementary (Greenup Co.) devotes 130 minutes to arts education, of which 34.6% is in music and visual arts and 15.4% in dance and theater. Hager Elementary (Ashland) devotes 120 minutes to the arts each week with 37.5% each in music and visual arts, and 12.5% ​​in dance and media arts. Russell Primary devotes 40.18% to both music and visual arts, and 19.64% to media arts.

Garrison Elementary devotes 70 minutes to teaching the arts each week. 85.71% of the time is devoted to music and 14.29% to dance.


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