Forms of art – Utopic Studios http://utopicstudios.com/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 09:38:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://utopicstudios.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-3-120x120.png Forms of art – Utopic Studios http://utopicstudios.com/ 32 32 United States Arts and Crafts Toys Market, By Type (Design https://utopicstudios.com/united-states-arts-and-crafts-toys-market-by-type-design/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 09:06:51 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/united-states-arts-and-crafts-toys-market-by-type-design/ New York, June 20, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Reportlinker.com announces the release of the report “United States Arts and Crafts Toys Market, By Type (Design Kits-Reusable, Painting & Drawing Kits, Boards, Clay & Dough and Others, By Distribution Channel, By Region, By Top Leading States, Competition, Forecast & Opportunity, 2017-2027” – https://www.reportlinker.com/p06287476/?utm_source=GNW }), by distribution […]]]>

New York, June 20, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Reportlinker.com announces the release of the report “United States Arts and Crafts Toys Market, By Type (Design Kits-Reusable, Painting & Drawing Kits, Boards, Clay & Dough and Others, By Distribution Channel, By Region, By Top Leading States, Competition, Forecast & Opportunity, 2017-2027” – https://www.reportlinker.com/p06287476/?utm_source=GNW
}), by distribution channel (toy stores, supermarkets/hypermarkets, online and other {stationery, gift shops, kiosks, etc.}), by region (south, west, mid-west, north-east), by Top Leading States, Competition, Forecast and Opportunities, 2017-2027

US arts and crafts toys market was valued at USD 1.26 billion in 2021 which is expected to grow with a CAGR of 7.38% over the forecast years to reach the market value of 1.91 billion USD by 2027F. Rapidly increasing demand for educationally advanced toys for better child development is driving the growth of the arts and crafts toys market in the United States over the next five years. The demand for educational toys has multiplied over the past two years amid COVID-19 since the demand for homeschooling and educational games has increased. Parents are very keen on better child development for their children and spend a lot on it. Rising disposable income of the population is also expected to further support the growth of the US arts and crafts toys market over the next five years.
Moreover, the industry experts mentioned that the industry market players are actively investing and bringing innovations and advancements in these toys to improve the demand and sales of the products. Increase in online shopping and e-commerce sector is also supporting the growth of the market.

The younger population is also inclined towards online educational games which justify the growth of the arts and crafts toys market in the United States in the next five years.
The United States arts and crafts toys market segmentation is based on type, distribution channel, region, major states, and competitive landscape. Based on type, the market is further fragmented into categories such as Reusable Design Kits, Painting & Drawing Kits, Boards, Clay & Dough and Others ({Construction & Construction Toys, molding and sculpting, etc.} Reusable design kits are expected to hold the largest market revenue shares and dominate the market segment over the next five years owing to the growing demand for creative toys for children. of resolution and critical thinking, stimulating visual learning, creativity and concentration, and helping them to imagine new ideas, further facilitate segmental growth as well as growth of the arts and crafts toys market in the United States United in the next five years is segmented into Toy Stores, Supermarkets/Hypermarkets, Online and Others {Stationery Shops, Gift Shops, Kiosks, etc.}, based on the channel of and distribution. The market analysis also studies the regions of the United States, such as the south, northwest, west, and midwest.
The major players in the arts and crafts toys market in the United States are Crayola LLC, Hasbro, Inc., Spin Master Inc., Mattel, Inc., US Toy Co., Inc., Tomy International, Inc. , Channel Craft, VTech. Holdings Limited, Fat Brain Toys, LLC, Faber-Castell USA, Inc., etc.

Years considered for this report:

Historical years: 2017-2020
Base year: 2021
Estimated year: 2022E
Forecast period: 2023F-2027F

Goal of the study:

• To analyze the market size of the United States Arts and Crafts Toys market from 2017 to 2021.
• Estimate and forecast the market size of Arts and Crafts Toys market in United States from 2022E to 2027F and the growth rate till 2027F.
• To classify and forecast the United States arts and crafts toys market based on type, distribution channel, region, major states, and competitive landscape.
• Identify the dominant region or segment in the US arts and crafts toys market.
• Identify drivers and challenges for the US arts and crafts toy market.
• Examine competitive developments such as expansions, new product launches, mergers and acquisitions, etc., in the arts and crafts toys market in the United States.
• Identify and analyze the profile of major players operating in the arts and crafts toys market in the United States.
• Identify the key sustainable strategies adopted by market players in the United States arts and crafts toys market.
The analyst conducted extensive primary and secondary research for this study. Initially, the analyst sourced a list of manufacturers across the country.

Subsequently, the analyst conducted primary research surveys with the identified companies. During the interviews, the respondents were also asked about their competitors.

Using this technique, the analyst could include manufacturers that could not be identified due to secondary research limitations. The analyst looked at the manufacturers, distribution channels and presence of all major players across the country.
The analyst calculated the size of the arts and crafts toys market in the United States using a bottom-up approach, in which the data of various end-user segments was recorded and forecasted for the coming years. The analyst obtained these values ​​from industry experts and company representatives and validated them externally by analyzing historical data for these products and applications to derive an appropriate overall market size.

Various secondary sources such as company websites, news articles, press releases, company annual reports, investor presentations and financial reports were also studied by the analyst.

Key target audience:

• Manufacturers, suppliers, distributors and other stakeholders
• Government bodies such as regulators and policy makers
• Organizations, forums and alliances related to arts and crafts toys
• Market research and consulting firms
The study is helpful in providing answers to several critical questions which are important for industry stakeholders such as manufacturers, suppliers, partners, end users etc. besides enabling them to elaborate investment strategies and to capitalize on market opportunities.
Click here to download the example

Report Scope:

In this report, the US arts and crafts toys market has been segmented into the following categories, in addition to industry trends which have also been detailed below:
• United States arts and crafts toys market, by type:
o Reusable Design Kits
o Painting and drawing kits
o Tips
o Clay & Dough
o Others
• Arts and crafts toys market in the United States, by distribution channel:
o Toy stores
o Supermarkets/Hypermarkets
on line
o Others
• Arts and crafts toys market in the United States, by region:
o South
o West
o Mid-West
o North-East

Competitive landscape

Company Profiles: Detailed analysis of the major companies operating in the US arts and crafts toys market.

Customizations available:

With the market data provided, we offer customizations based on a company’s specific needs. The following customization options are available for the report:

Company Information

Detailed analysis and profiling of other market players (up to five).
Read the full report: https://www.reportlinker.com/p06287476/?utm_source=GNW

About Reportlinker
ReportLinker is an award-winning market research solution. Reportlinker finds and organizes the latest industry data so you get all the market research you need – instantly, in one place.

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Discovering Facets of Data Science with Art and Technology “Data is a New Art Form” 2022 Young Art Competition Results Announced https://utopicstudios.com/discovering-facets-of-data-science-with-art-and-technology-data-is-a-new-art-form-2022-young-art-competition-results-announced/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 07:28:00 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/discovering-facets-of-data-science-with-art-and-technology-data-is-a-new-art-form-2022-young-art-competition-results-announced/ The Musketeers Foundation Institute of Data Science at the University of Hong Kong (“the Institute”) has organized the 2022 “Data is the New Art Form” Art Competition. It aims to break stereotypes about science data and to enable the community to better understand this new area of ​​data science research. The scientific research results of […]]]>

The Musketeers Foundation Institute of Data Science at the University of Hong Kong (“the Institute”) has organized the 2022 “Data is the New Art Form” Art Competition. It aims to break stereotypes about science data and to enable the community to better understand this new area of ​​data science research. The scientific research results of data science, being closely related to everyday applications, actually bring improvement to both local and international communities. This is the first time that a large-scale art competition has been launched by a research institute to draw on both art aesthetics and science, two seemingly irrelevant topics. On the afternoon of June 16, 2022, the Institute invited all shortlisted contestants to attend a Grand Prize Ceremony, held at Chi Wah Learning Commons, the centennial campus of the Institute. ‘university. Not only did guests and their friends and family gather onsite to enjoy the exciting artwork display of the winning works, but the results of the competition were also announced onsite.

The art contest participants were categorized into two groups, the HKU group and the secondary school group – paintings and digital graphics were accepted. Comprised of professional judges who are leading figures in various fields of academic research at HKU, the five members of the judging panel, including Professor Max Shen, Vice President and Pro-Vice Chancellor (Research) and Director of the Institute, Professor Ian Holliday, Vice-President and Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Teaching and Learning), Professor William Hayward, Dean of the Faculty of Social Sciences, Professor Herman Cappelen, Full Professor of Philosophy, and Dr. Roslyn Lee Hammers, Associate Professor in the Department of Art History. As the judges expressed, it was difficult to decide on the first prize winners and the merit winners, let alone choose two of them all as the grand prize winners of the special prize “Data is the new form of art”, judging on their adhesion and their imagination on the theme “Data Future”. The Special Prize winners, who both made digital graphic submissions, were ultimately awarded to Wu Ping from the HKU Group and Hui Yi Lan from the High School Group. Their respective works were titled “Whales of Neural Networks” and “Data · Us (數據 · 我們)”. Ms. Wu Ping, winner of the special award, is currently a postgraduate student at the LKS Medical School. His work on “Neural Network Whales” received unanimous votes from all the judges. The light and lively ceremony was full of joy and excitement from over 100 guests and attendees on site.

Professor Max Shen, Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Research) as well as Director of the Institute, exclaimed: “I am actually more than happy to see how the participants illustrate their own perceptions of data science and its diverse applications through means other than scientific investigation or analysis. This sits well with the Institute’s commitment to nurturing young talent, promoting innovation and, ultimately, having a positive impact on society. I strongly believe that artistic creations will be something that can bring people closer to data science and scientific research, because they are always so colorful and warm. Another member of the jury, Dr Roslyn Lee Hammers , an associate professor in the Department of Art History at HKU, agreed and added, “I really enjoyed the opportunity to see the artwork created by the students on the theme ‘Data is the new form. of a rt”. . As an art historian interested in creative responses to our common human experience, the works submitted for the competition demonstrated a wide variety of creativity and irresistible enthusiasm. Overall, the submissions showcase innovative and engaging interpretations of data science, AI, and smart society ideas. I had so much fun being part of the jury.”

Representatives of Wah Yan College in Kowloon, the secondary school awarded with the most active participation in this competition, including the principal Mr. Warren Chung and several students who joined the competition, also participated in the award ceremony.

Many winners from the junior categories were also seen at the awards ceremony. Lui Sze Ting, a 2nd grade student from Carmel Pak U Secondary School, was the youngest winner of all – she proudly received the Secondary School Group’s Painting Genre Gold Award with her winning piece titled ” Data + Science = Life (數據 + 科學 = 生活).” Said him: “I thank the Institute very much for giving me the opportunity to build a future society in my mind using colorful paintings, and even to to be able to display my artistic creation in the HKU office!” Another winner, Dr. Frank Xue, an assistant professor in the Department of Real Estate and Construction of the Faculty of Architecture, who was also a member of the Institute, said that he had been pleasantly surprised that his digital creation could catch the judges’ attention to the many excellent entries submitted by his HKU fellows.His work named “Science and Light” used artificial intelligence as graphical tools in the creative tion, and at the same time brought to light the virtue of “Sapientia Et Virtus” illustrated in the HKU anthem, giving an excellent representation of the combination of colors and technology.

A unique feature of this event is that the winning artworks would win a chance to be displayed in prominent areas of the Institute’s new offices and integrated into the interior layouts. As the title of the competition suggests, the Institute, being the first of ten research institutes in the University’s technological development plan for the next decade, aspires to establish a new “interactive art gallery for data science where young people can discover their potential. and creativity. It is our vision that the seemingly impossible and wild fantasies presented in the award-winning works of art will become reality through our research excellence and world-class infrastructure for data science research.

Snapshots from the awards ceremony and art exhibition:

Picture 1:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1miaFKU9B8HncZxmGUrzjBIp0BjbKcRgM/view?usp=sharing

(Group photo of all winners)

Picture 2:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/10OoI0iLoHgqa0ykM7tZuVJvpbpOl3wBQ/view?usp=sharing

(Members of Wah Yan College, Kowloon, including Principal Mr. Warren Chung and several students who joined the competition, receiving the “Most Active Participation Award” from Professor Ian Holliday, Vice-President and Pro-Vice-Chancellor (teaching and learning), HKU

Picture 3:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1fLDUI6uCMBb4-H15o0KemJ909XEmPd0F/view?usp=sharing

(Wu Ping, winner of the HKU Group Digital Graphics Genre Gold Award, was also one of the winners of the special award “Data is the new art form“)

Picture 4:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/16r8PN8qRsigkkWuLSKG-twuhB7BekeNx/view?usp=sharing

(Lively atmosphere during the awards ceremony with the presence of various guests and participants from all groups)

Picture 5:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1aTQdlFzhabndQCK3KIuaGUWkT0xnLVnd/view?usp=sharing

(The exquisitely decorated ceremony venue was an Instagrammable site for all event attendees)

About the HKU Musketeers Foundation Institute for Data Science

For more details about the Institute, please see: https://datascience.hku.hk/

/Public release. This material from the original organization/authors may be ad hoc in nature, edited for clarity, style and length. The views and opinions expressed are those of the author or authors. See in full here.

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A French artist awakens the senses of people tired by the pandemic https://utopicstudios.com/a-french-artist-awakens-the-senses-of-people-tired-by-the-pandemic/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 05:44:28 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/a-french-artist-awakens-the-senses-of-people-tired-by-the-pandemic/ ‘Jean-Michel Othoniel: Treasure Garden’ presented in Seoul is the largest exhibition of artists in 10 years An installation view of Jean-Michel Othoniel’s “Riviere Bleue (Blue River)” and “Knot” series at the Seoul Museum of Art (CJY Art Studio) A shimmering blue river runs along the floor of the museum, and knot-shaped droplets float above the […]]]>

‘Jean-Michel Othoniel: Treasure Garden’ presented in Seoul is the largest exhibition of artists in 10 years

An installation view of Jean-Michel Othoniel’s “Riviere Bleue (Blue River)” and “Knot” series at the Seoul Museum of Art (CJY Art Studio)

A shimmering blue river runs along the floor of the museum, and knot-shaped droplets float above the stream. The combination of works by French artist Jean-Michel Othoniel is overwhelming, stimulating the visual senses.

The tranquil blue river, measuring 26 meters long and 7 meters wide, is made of blocks of blue glass created in collaboration with glassblowers in Firozabad, a famous center of glassblowing in India. The color blue, called “Firozi” blue, embraces multiple references to Mediterranean culture and the cradle of Indo-European civilization.

The exhibition “Jean-Michel Othoniel: Treasure Garden” at the Seoul Museum of Art is the largest exhibition of the artist, known as a master of glass, since the 2011 retrospective at the Center Pompidou. The Seoul show features some 70 plays from the past decade.

The series of knots – which hangs above “Riviere Bleue (Blue River)” – are made of stainless steel and mirrored glass, which the artist began exploring in 2009 and developed with Mexican mathematician Aubin Arroyo . Standing close to the nodes, the glass beads reflect the viewer and mirror each other, evoking a sense of infinity.

“I had a culture shock in India when I learned that the technique of glass blowing had a history of 2,000 years,” Othoniel said during a press preview on Wednesday.

On the wall are blocks of bricks in two different color combinations: blue and yellow or blue and red. Each installation looks like a beacon – the bricks reflect light from the ceiling, creating a shadow that looks like a flare.

“Precious Stonewall”, by Jean-Michel Othoniel, at the Seoul Museum of Art (Park Yuna/The Korea Herald)

The two-tone bricks, titled “Precious Stonewall,” are the result of the artist’s desperate persistence to remain an artist. Othoniel made a series of drawings like daily diary entries during the pandemic lockdown in France. The brick sculptures are based on the drawings.

“No one knew when the pandemic would end. I wanted to find energy and rhythm for creativity in the midst of hopeless times,” he said. “I made the drawing like a daily diary. I was able to regain the power to continue creating art.

The exhibition extends to the Deoksugung Palace, located opposite the museum. A small pond in the corner of the palace is decorated with Othoniel’s “Golden Lotus”, golden sculptures of lotus flowers. The fact that the lotus blooms in the mud attracted the artist to the flower.

An installation view of “Gold Lotus”, “Gold Rose”, and “Collier Or (Gold Necklace)” by Jean-Michel Othoniel at Deoksugung (CJY Art Studio)

When he visited South Korea 10 years ago and took a look around the palace, he had no idea that he would one day have an exhibition here at the palace, showcasing his works at the pond. He described it as a miracle. The golden sculptures look different depending on the weather. When it rains, it can have a more meditative vibe while it can be glorious on a sunny day.

“The garden is so beautiful. It’s inspiring, peaceful and meditative,” he said.

Golden necklaces, “Collier Or”, hang from the trees in the center of the pond, reminiscent of a wishing tree on which people hang written wishes.

For the exhibition in Seoul, Othoniel presents “Plum Blossom”, inspired by the floral motif used in the palace buildings. It is painted in two colors – red to express the petals of the flower and yellow to signify the pollen. It delivers a message of vitality, resistance and perseverance and resurrection symbolized by the plum blossom.

An installation view of “Plum Blossom” and “La Rose du Louvre (The Rose of Louvre)” by Jean-Michel Othoniel at the Seoul Museum of Art (CJY Art Studio)

Born in 1964, Othoniel came to international attention when his “La Rose du Louvre”, created to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the Louvre Pyramid in Paris in 2019, was acquired by the Louvre Museum for its permanent collection. It is the only contemporary work still present in the museum’s collection.

The artist’s last exhibition in Seoul was “New Works” at Kukje Gallery held in December 2020.

The exhibition at the Seoul Museum of Art runs until August 7. The museum is closed on Mondays.

(yunapark@heraldcorp.com)

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How to take a self-guided tour https://utopicstudios.com/how-to-take-a-self-guided-tour/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 07:57:42 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/how-to-take-a-self-guided-tour/ Atlanta has long been a hub for artists of all types. Different parts of the city offer little nuggets of ATL’s history, present and future. Atlanta is also home to Living Walls, a curator and producer of street artists and muralists who display their work on walls around the city. They have facilitated over 150 […]]]>

Atlanta has long been a hub for artists of all types. Different parts of the city offer little nuggets of ATL’s history, present and future.

Atlanta is also home to Living Walls, a curator and producer of street artists and muralists who display their work on walls around the city. They have facilitated over 150 public murals featured in metro Atlanta.

Different neighborhoods in Atlanta offer a unique perspective on the local art scene. To explore like a native, here are some street art destinations to get you started:

Castleberry Hill

Park around 131 Walker St SW and grab a coffee at the local spot, Black Coffee, to start your walking tour.

Castleberry Hill, located within walking distance of downtown sites such as CNN, Centennial Olympic Park and Mercedes-Benz Stadium, has become famous for its street art. Every second Friday of the month, join the Castleberry Hill Art Walk from 6-10 p.m. But to explore on your own, start at the corner of Walker and Haynes Street across from Bottle Rocket, and you’ll find murals of two beloved Atlanta United players. , Brad Guzan and Joseph Martinez. Wander the block to find several other murals steeped in rich history.

Small ATL doors

Check the map to hunt down all the doors and get an idea of ​​the different areas of the city. Artist Karen Anderson Singer created these miniature doors to bring an element of curiosity and imagination.

“Doors are a really great way to quickly access the imagination,” Singer told CBS News. “Most people have had interactions with a door, they inherently know there is something behind it. And it’s not about doors. It’s about community, interaction and engagement , and it’s sort of a love note for Atlanta.

They are all designed to look like the neighborhood and feel like the neighborhood.

No street art tour in Atlanta is complete without a walk through the Krog Street Tunnel. In this ever-changing canvas, artists from across the city express themselves on this vibrant and living wall. It is considered Atlanta’s living bulletin board and urban art gallery, according to The Daily Krog.

This tunnel is part of Atlanta’s Beltline project and is a popular spot for photo shoots and rap videos. It’s also a link between the neighborhoods of Cabbagetown, Reynolds Park, and Inman Park, where you can find tons of livelier street art.

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No talent required in the lucrative new era of the amateur gentleman | Marthe Gill https://utopicstudios.com/no-talent-required-in-the-lucrative-new-era-of-the-amateur-gentleman-marthe-gill/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 14:14:00 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/no-talent-required-in-the-lucrative-new-era-of-the-amateur-gentleman-marthe-gill/ JThe idea that people should succeed and fail on their merits at work is quite modern. Until towards the end of the 19th century in Britain, it was only natural that the top end of all sorts of professions – sports, science, art, politics – should be occupied not by hard-working and talented people, but […]]]>

JThe idea that people should succeed and fail on their merits at work is quite modern. Until towards the end of the 19th century in Britain, it was only natural that the top end of all sorts of professions – sports, science, art, politics – should be occupied not by hard-working and talented people, but by rich amateurs. “Gentlemen amateurs,” a phenomenon that dates back to the 17th century, were the Renaissance sorts both created and personified by Arthur Conan Doyle: those who had time to treat quarries like interesting collectibles. Above all, they also had a social attraction. So where they tried, they dominated.

Sometimes trial and error led to spectacular breakthroughs: Charles Darwin is a famous example. But gradually, a consensus formed that a thick, stifling layer of privilege held back talent and stood in the way of progress. Amateur officers were blamed for the military disasters of the Boer War. The bourgeois-bohemians of Bloomsbury picked up patronage in the art world while the rest starved to death in their garrets. In the decades leading up to World War I, a pair of vulgar new “professionals” got rid of and shut out these aristocratic parasites. Meritocracy in the world of work had begun in earnest. The amateur gentlemen have disappeared.

It’s until recently, in the creative arts, where something like them is back. A group of wealthy and socially elite amateurs have once again arrived to crowd out the talent and soak up the money. Members of this group might adopt art “as therapy, just for me”, and the best galleries will claim their uneducated daubs. They might decide to write a children’s book “for their own children, really”, only for their first (dismal) effort to secure a spectacular publishing deal.

I’m talking, of course, about celebrities. Over the past few decades, a strange new rule has emerged: get famous enough in one creative field and you’re practically successful in another. It doesn’t matter how awful you might be at the second. Jim Carrey makes astonishing sums from his amateur paintings: the prints alone are on sale for $800, and at one point a couple might pay $10,000 just to attend an exhibition. However, the art is obviously of a bad reputation (example of criticism: “It gives a bad reputation to amateurs”). Pierce Brosnan can’t paint either, but one of his lackluster efforts grossed $1.4 million (he claimed to be “flabbergasted”). Last month Robbie Williams had an exhibition at Sotheby’s, a chance any professional artist would kill for. “I was like, ‘Oh fuck! Anyone can [do] art,” Williams told a newspaper. “So I went to the art supply store and bought everything.”

Or take children’s books. The strange Darwin introduces himself (David Baddiel is really good). But most of the celebrity stuff that clots the market is unimaginative dross, and the book deals just keep coming. Reese Witherspoon, Seth Meyers and Serena Williams are all making their debuts this year, alongside many others. On TV, Meghan and Harry’s Netflix deal – an offshoot of their stardom alone – would be the envy of any major producer. Last month, I saw Johnny Depp give a rock concert alongside Jeff Beck at Albert Hall. “[Depp] is a mediocre musician,” an irate Beck fan told me. “It’s like it’s your mate you’re cheering on.”

Of course, the arts don’t think they’re turning into an offshoot of celebrity merchandising. They think to democratize art, “to appeal to young people”, or “at least to make children read”. They argue that allowing celebrities to cosplay as artists, musicians and children’s authors helps fund the rest. It may be true. But in doing so, they undermine principles they cannot afford to lose. Along with the fundamental injustice of letting fame trump excellence, there is a definite risk that talent will leak out of the arts. The distribution of success in these areas is pyramidal: for every amateur celebrity show at Sotheby’s, there will be cash-strapped career performers driven out of the business. And behind the big celebrities, of course, come hordes of mini-celebrities: the influencers, on the sidelines to land book deals and art exhibits. Meritocracies are more fragile than we think. Pull on a thread and they come undone.

Of course, it’s not just the arts where meritocracy is declining. As authors like Adrian Wooldridge have pointed out, the tendency to hoard opportunities for ourselves and our families means that the children of the wealthy have a head start in many professions. But no field is in a state of feudal regression, I would say, like those fields of the creative arts that seem to have completely given up on merit. They become machines for finding and aligning themselves with the privileged.

We are told that this is a very modern question: to do with social media and the attention economy. That may be how we got here, but the phenomenon is old and smacks of the 19th century. Look how contemporary art, for example, has begun to talk less about “competence” and “talent” and more about “influence”. The “influence” of an artist is what matters now. Or in other, older words: their social attractiveness and social status.

The parallels with amateur gentlemen are hard to ignore. Under threat from professionals in the late 1800s, gentlemen adopted an air of moral and philosophical superiority. The lower orders were mercenaries who only cared about money and played to win; themselves only cared about honor and the love of the profession. It is also the shield often used by current amateurs to snatch opportunities from professional artists.

They don’t do anything so vulgar as making money – they donate everything to charity. Furthermore, their work has a higher purpose than just the product: it is their personal journey – “a way to explore who they really are”, “their form of therapy” or “a chance to collaborate with a friend (celebrity)”. Against such noble principles, who could complain if the art is not good?

  • Do you have an opinion on the issues raised in this article? If you would like to submit a letter of up to 250 words to be considered for publication, please email it to us at observer.letters@observer.co.uk

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Vrindavan institute to include art forms in its curriculum https://utopicstudios.com/vrindavan-institute-to-include-art-forms-in-its-curriculum/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 05:30:02 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/vrindavan-institute-to-include-art-forms-in-its-curriculum/ Mathura, June 10 (IANS): The Vrindavan Research Institute is preparing to incorporate traditional art forms into the curriculum of certificate courses in the State Cultural University curriculum. The institute is in the process of finalizing the curriculum of four subjects namely Sanjhi Art, Braj Lok Sangeet, Ras Leela and Braj Bhasha. The director […]]]>

Mathura, June 10 (IANS): The Vrindavan Research Institute is preparing to incorporate traditional art forms into the curriculum of certificate courses in the State Cultural University curriculum.

The institute is in the process of finalizing the curriculum of four subjects namely Sanjhi Art, Braj Lok Sangeet, Ras Leela and Braj Bhasha.

The director of the institute, Dr. AK Pandey, said: “The program will be completed within 15 days and we will submit it to the state government for approval. The government wants to promote Braj culture and we have been asked to prepare a program for a few subjects. It will include both theoretical and practical aspects of the art, with the aim of developing its interest among young people.”

So far, this art is limited to temples only. The ancient artwork uses hand stencils cut from paper to create patterns on the floor.

Sanjhi art has special significance in mythology. It is believed that Radha used to decorate the walls with Sanjhi Art to attract Lord Krishna’s attention when he came back after grazing cows.

Rajesh Sharma, a researcher, said: “Children learn the art of Sanjhi in workshop sessions at the institute, but it still needs a wider platform for others to learn the artistic model and popularize it.”

The scholar further added that there are two types of Sanjhi art, temple culture and folk culture.

In temple culture there is a depiction of Radha-Krishna Leela while in popular culture he is drawn on the walls using colors and cow dung.

A Sanjhi Art panel was recently donated by Prime Minister Narendra Modi to US President Joe Biden.

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A Russian engraver creates posters for peace https://utopicstudios.com/a-russian-engraver-creates-posters-for-peace/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 05:42:15 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/a-russian-engraver-creates-posters-for-peace/ Published on: 06/08/2022 – 07:42 Moscow (AFP) – Prior to the launch of Russia’s military campaign in Ukraine, printer Sergei Besov was part of a burgeoning art scene centered around a converted factory in northern Moscow. Using an old printing press with large wooden Cyrillic type and vintage red ink, Besov created nostalgia-tinged posters with […]]]>

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Moscow (AFP) – Prior to the launch of Russia’s military campaign in Ukraine, printer Sergei Besov was part of a burgeoning art scene centered around a converted factory in northern Moscow.

Using an old printing press with large wooden Cyrillic type and vintage red ink, Besov created nostalgia-tinged posters with updated Soviet-style slogans.

More than three months after Russian forces entered Ukraine in late February, Besov is still working, but these days his posters are not limited to witty slogans.

“Everyone needs peace,” reads one of his latest creations, hanging above the entrance to his Partisan Press poster studio.

Besov, 45, immediately caught the eye when, at the start of the Russian military offensive, he started printing “No to war” posters in the store.

A video of a poster in progress has garnered 3.6 million views on Instagram.

“It was not clear if martial law was going to be introduced… Everyone was in a panic,” he said.

Besov stopped making ‘No to War’ posters after Russia introduced tough new censorship laws, making it illegal to call intervention a war and imposing prison terms on those found guilty of discrediting the Russian army.

He started printing the “Everyone Needs Peace” posters, but police showed up at the store anyway in early March and arrested two of his employees.

– ‘They speak of fear’ –

“They were very nervous,” he said. Both women are now waiting to hear whether they will face charges.

Poster slogans are loaded with words that cannot be said Kirill KUDRYAVTSEV AFP

The workshop took a few weeks off in March “just out of fear,” Besov says, but is back in business.

On a recent spring day, Besov was out on the streets of Moscow in sunglasses and a black T-shirt, using a paintbrush to daub one of his posters in front of a graffiti-covered brick wall.

Once the glue was applied, he pasted the poster reading: “If there are dreams, there will be journeys.

Tens of thousands of Russians have decided to make one-way trips since the start of the conflict, fleeing the country with no plans to return.

But Besov says he plans to stay.

“Today the posters are about what happens to us. They are about fear. ‘Fear is no reason not to act’ was the first poster we printed after our break,” says- he.

The slogans of the posters are vague and disturbing, loaded with unspeakable words: “The wave will sweep everything away”, “The main thing is not to get lost”, “Every wall has a door”.

It simply reads “Cognitive Dissonance” – a reference, Besov says, to the number of Moscow people living their normal lives while “our friends there (in Ukraine) are suffering”.

“And even worse, we understand that everyone gets used to it.”

Despite his passion for his work, Besov does not know how long he will be able to keep his stores running or print the posters.

Its main activity is the printing of high-end stationery and business cards in another nearby workshop under the Demon Press imprint. But under Western sanctions, the fine paper he uses for the business will soon be nowhere to be found in Moscow.

Many have left but Besov plans to stay in Russia and continue his art for as long as he can.
Many have left but Besov plans to stay in Russia and continue his art for as long as he can. Kirill KUDRYAVTSEV AFP

And the vintage red ink he uses for his posters – made in the Soviet-dominated Hungarian People’s Republic in 1989 – will also soon run out.

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Through cartoons, he captures life in the suburbs of Washington https://utopicstudios.com/through-cartoons-he-captures-life-in-the-suburbs-of-washington/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 17:33:51 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/through-cartoons-he-captures-life-in-the-suburbs-of-washington/ Placeholder while loading article actions In the first panel of a cartoon drawn by Mike Mount, a crowd stands in front of a multi-story building under construction. Together they shout the name of a popular grocery store, expressing the common hope that she will find a home on the ground floor of this structure. “Wegmans! […]]]>
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In the first panel of a cartoon drawn by Mike Mount, a crowd stands in front of a multi-story building under construction. Together they shout the name of a popular grocery store, expressing the common hope that she will find a home on the ground floor of this structure.

“Wegmans! Wegmans! Wegmans! Wegmans! Wegman!

In the next panel, the building stands in its final form, and two panels indicate which businesses have actually moved into the first floor.

“Nail – Spa”, it reads. “Tan,” reads the other.

If you live in a big city or a small town, you might be thinking “Huh?” or “Is this supposed to be funny?”

But if you live in one of Washington’s suburbs, this sketchy scene probably strikes a familiar disappointment. Mixed-use buildings are on the rise, bringing with them the hope that they will attract exciting new businesses, and then disappoint when those occupants end up looking like those that already exist a few blocks away. Mount’s cartoon caption read, “The Arlington Mixed-Use Lottery.”

“How many tanning salons, nail salons and ABC (liquor) stores are needed here?” Mount said one recent morning when I asked him about this cartoon. “I can think of a thousand things that can go into these places.”

Mount is not a professional designer. He’ll tell you he’s not even that great. He’s self-critical that way. “Drawing hands is one of the worst things for me,” he said. “I just can’t control it.”

But the father-of-two has long been a fan of the art form and in the past year has become a community cartoonist. He creates weekly cartoons for online media in his county of Northern Virginia, capturing in these scribbled squares the weird, comical, and relatable parts of life in one of Washington’s suburbs.

He does this work for free because he believes in supporting local journalism – which is dying one publication at a time across the country – and because of the critical eye he brings to his work.

“I would feel bad getting paid for things that weren’t worth it,” he said.

Value is subjective, but there is value in cartoons that focus on local communities. They reveal the problems, priorities and absurdities of the places, and in the case of the Mount cartoons, they do so about life in the suburbs. When someone from another state learns that someone is from Washington, they probably think of monuments, memorials, and city streets. But that term has become a generic shorthand for DC and its neighboring counties of Maryland and Virginia. These suburbs are places of concentration of wealth, power and social struggles. It is also where many of the people who make decisions with national consequences live and work.

Arlington, where Mount has lived for more than 20 years, is home to the Pentagon, Reagan National Airport and Amazon’s new headquarters.

One of Mount’s cartoons denounces Amazon founder (and Washington Post owner) Jeff Bezos’ investment in space travel. It shows two people looking at a rocket with the word “Arlington” on the side firing up. The caption: “County Council consulted Bezos on fiscally responsible ways to spend its budget surplus this year.”

Another of his cartoons features two couples talking outside a house. The caption: “We moved to Arlington for public schools, but our house payment is really tuition.”

It’s funny (and moan-worthy), because it’s true. It has become increasingly normal for a house in Arlington to cost in the seven figures. In January, a headline on the WTOP website read, “Want a house in Arlington? $1.3 million should be enough.

Mount had no intention of becoming a community cartoonist. His work is born out of his admiration for others. It has all the books from “The Far Side” creator Gary Larson. “Like Seinfeld episodes, I can read them over and over and still laugh,” he said. So when the urge to create his own cartoons hit him about eight years ago, a few years after he went from being a national security producer for CNN to doing public relations work for a defense contractor , he accepted. He researched subjects worthy of social commentary, sketched them into scenes, and submitted them to The New Yorker.

The result: lots of rejection.

“I’d come with these cartoons and show them to my wife, and she’d be like, ‘Oh, that’s hilarious,’ or ‘I don’t understand,’ and send them over,” Mount said. . At some point, he realized he would have to submit hundreds of cartoons to maybe publish one. “I just didn’t have time to do that with work and family. But once in a while, I would round up 10 people and send them off, and then get email rejections.

Eventually, Mount started looking around and realized that the stories airing on ARLnow, an online medium that focuses on Arlington, provided a lot of material for the comic.

He now creates cartoons for the publication which air monthly online and weekly in a newsletter for paying members.

“Mike is well versed in local issues that really matter to Arlingtonians, but can seem almost comically minor to everyone else,” said Scott Brodbeck, founder and CEO of Local News Now, which publishes ARLnow, FFXnow and ALXnow. “Local to the point of absurdity is where I – and I suspect many readers – find a lot of the humor. But there’s also real satire and social commentary in there, that which helps highlight community topics that deserve more attention and consideration.

So far, his cartoons seem to be resonating with locals, based on feedback they’ve received on the site.

Of his mixed-use building cartoon, someone wrote, “I’ve never seen anything depict Arlington more accurately than Wegmans’ cartoon.”

About his cartoon about the high cost of housing, someone commented, “Taxes instead of tuition is a very real decision. Not a cartoon.

And after redesigning the county’s logo, depicting it with an overturned car in its center, someone praised its work, then snapped a photo of Maryland’s driver skills. This person wrote, “I’m shocked – shocked and appalled – that the overturned car doesn’t have a Maryland license spot.”

In an ARLnow article that introduced Mount to readers in August, he talked about having a large cartoon collection he calls “Rejected by the New Yorker.” It also set reader expectations.

“My cartoons don’t always make a home run, and one of these days I’m sure I’ll have a big collection of ‘Rejected by ARLnow,'” he reportedly said. “In the meantime, I hope people have fun with them.”

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The Last Days of Roger Federer by Geoff Dyer review – the art of bowing out | Sports and leisure books https://utopicstudios.com/the-last-days-of-roger-federer-by-geoff-dyer-review-the-art-of-bowing-out-sports-and-leisure-books/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 06:30:00 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/the-last-days-of-roger-federer-by-geoff-dyer-review-the-art-of-bowing-out-sports-and-leisure-books/ geoff Dyer has always been a predominantly youthful literary presence. In a career of novels, biographies, essays, reviews, memoirs and journalism, there has always been a keen curiosity for the disparate things that capture his attention: DH Lawrence; Jazz; Burning Man; Russian cinema; drugs; the Somme… Of course, one of the main things that has […]]]>

geoff Dyer has always been a predominantly youthful literary presence. In a career of novels, biographies, essays, reviews, memoirs and journalism, there has always been a keen curiosity for the disparate things that capture his attention: DH Lawrence; Jazz; Burning Man; Russian cinema; drugs; the Somme… Of course, one of the main things that has always caught Dyer’s attention is Geoff Dyer, and he’s now trying to bring his freshness, bounce and humor to an examination of the decidedly not-youthful spheres of ” things that are coming to an end, last works of artists, time is running out”. It’s his time. Although Dyer is still young at heart, he is also now in his 60s, had a mini-stroke in his mid-50s, and his habit of playing tennis has left him with “multiple permutations of problems: rotator cuff, hip flexor, wrist, cricked neck, lower back and bad knees (both)”.

Dyer’s obsession with tennis has only grown in intensity over the years. He still plays twice a week – although these days he is unable to serve overhand – and his time on TV has been multiplied dramatically by a friend sharing a password for the tennis channel . The endless speculation about Roger Federer’s retirement naturally interested him and it became important to him “that a book based on my own experience of the changes brought on by aging be completed before Roger’s retirement”. (“Yes, ‘Roger’, not ‘Federer’,” he explains, “even though I’ve never met him, it’s Roger, always and only Roger.”)

Yet, just like Dyer’s book on DH Lawrence, Out of Sheer Rage, was about not writing a book about DH Lawrence, this book isn’t really about Federer. We learn snippets of what he means to Dyer – down to a close read of the two points he lost to Novak Djokovic in the 2019 Wimbledon final. But he’s a minor player compared to the study. of Dyer on the terrible but endlessly attractive Bob Dylan concerts, old JMW Turner throwing caution to the wind, Beethoven’s last quartets, Nietzsche’s breakdown or, of course, Dyer himself. Longtime readers will know the bones of his biography – working class Cheltenham; high school; Oxford; The bohemian 80s life in Brixton that turned into a career as a writer – but snippets of it are seen through a new lens. He recalls that those close to him, living in a “low-paid, often unpleasant and unrewarding world of work”, saw retirement as something to “look forward to from a surprisingly early age. It was a form of promotion, practically an ambition.A Duke of Edinburgh’s awards camp (he stopped after bronze, and abandonment is also a theme of the book) is remembered as the moment he heard the news that George Best had abandoned the football at just 26. More tangentially, a trip from Oxford to see the Lewisham Clash occasion an elegiac passage on the notion of the last train, which he and his friend had missed.Another riff recalls the misery of the last orders placed in British pubs.

Dyer’s charting ability allows him to roam widely. (And perhaps to collect seemingly random work in the book.) There are sections on the linked demise of the Plains Indians and the buffalo, and on Robert Redford, facing death alone on a stricken yacht, in the 2013 film All Is Lost. Among the many novels on which Dyer has called time are The Brothers Karamazov (his copy still has a 2012 receipt from a restaurant in Bologna between pages 80 and 81) and A Dance to the Music of Time by Anthony Powell – the first attempt after volume five, the second in book three. His only regret is not having abandoned it sooner, “ideally before even having started”.

But while he’s a connoisseur of the mundane details of failure – often cleverly crafted for humor with himself as the target – he also has a joyous appreciation of the transcendent and the triumphant. A long list of “things we finally get to, late in the day” includes the writings of Jean Rhys and Eve Babitz, and Colonel Blimp by Powell and Pressburger. In a book about things that are mostly too late, the many mentions of lockdown seem oddly a bit too early. Not because they are distressing, more that they are still too familiar and even Dyer’s originality cannot make them surprising.

In another writer, Dyer’s tendency towards self-centeredness could easily be tiresome. But the minutiae it pulls out for display – the free tennis hookup, the industrial-scale hotel shampoo outlet – ring true to life and embody a sort of openness. And it’s this openness and attention to things that encourages you to trust him and follow him on sometimes more obscure forays, like Nietzsche’s notion of the eternal return. But there’s still humor, as well as the sense that he’s been watching things carefully and thinking things through. He might note that at any poetry reading, “no matter how enjoyable, the words we most look forward to hearing are always the same: ‘I’ll read two more poems’.” Yet her book is saturated with a deep engagement with poetry from Larkin to Tennyson, Milton, Louise Glück and many others.

Dyer acknowledges that he tends towards demographic norms in that he finds himself increasingly reluctant to “move away from the military history section of bookstores, with an increasingly heavy emphasis on World War II world”. But he’s also someone who still indulges in intricately choreographed hallucinogenic drugs in Joshua Tree, literally dreams of playing football (“my best dreams of the year”), and rides his bike with the enthusiasm apparent of an eight-year-old child. Age has come upon him, but youth has not disappeared. It’s the knee pads on both legs that keep him on the tennis court now, but like Federer, it’s a reserve of flair, touch, timing and keen eye that keeps him in the game.

The Last Days of Roger Federer: And Other Endings by Geoff Dyer is published by Canongate (£20). To support the Guardian and the Observer, order your copy from guardianbookshop.com. Delivery charges may apply.

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Spider-Man’s darkest form unleashes his disgusting powers in new fan art https://utopicstudios.com/spider-mans-darkest-form-unleashes-his-disgusting-powers-in-new-fan-art/ Tue, 31 May 2022 16:33:00 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/spider-mans-darkest-form-unleashes-his-disgusting-powers-in-new-fan-art/ The darkest and weirdest Spider-Verse variant of Spider-Man is all spider-stars in a great piece of Marvel Comics fan art. In a great piece of Marvel Comics fan art, the most disgusting variant of Spider-Man, Spiderman, a being made entirely of thousands of spiders, shows off its horrific powers. On his Twitter account, artist George […]]]>

The darkest and weirdest Spider-Verse variant of Spider-Man is all spider-stars in a great piece of Marvel Comics fan art.

In a great piece of Marvel Comics fan art, the most disgusting variant of Spider-Man, Spiderman, a being made entirely of thousands of spiders, shows off its horrific powers. On his Twitter account, artist George Kambadais showed off his new piece featuring the bizarre spider hero, beautifully capturing the bizarre abilities of the Spider-Verse hero. Spiders-Man can be seen breaking apart as he swings with a bright sky behind him. It is a beautiful but frightening image.

The Spider-Verse is filled with different types of Spider-Heroes, with Spider-Man, Spider-Gwen, and Spider-Man Noir being some of the most popular. However, the Spider-Verse is also home to some extremely weird and bizarre Spider-Heroes. From the humanoid-spider Man-Spider to the combined dinosaur-Spiderman Arachnosaur hero, there are plenty of weird creations in the Marvel Comics multiverse. However, Spiders-Man from Earth-11580, who appeared in the Spider-Geddon cross of Christos Gage and Jorge Molina, might be the rudest of them all. Originally, Peter Parker’s version became Spiders-Man after being devoured by a colony of radioactive spiders, as his consciousness became the hive mind for the arachnids. They trained together to create Spiders-Man, a disgusting hero made entirely of spiders.

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Related: Miles Morales’ Sister Just Became Marvel’s New Spider-Smasher

On his Twitter account, George Kambadais (John Carter of Mars) shared his amazing Spiders-Man fan art. The Ringo Award-nominated comic book artist’s take on the character is both disgusting and beautiful, as the art features the hero with the skyline behind him. Despite the beautiful day, Spiders-Man can be seen breaking apart as he swings through the air, as the art shows the spiders that make up his being. The image does a great job of showcasing Spiders-Man’s weird powers and existence while giving him some legitimately excellent fan art.


The strange Spider-Verse hero may look horrifying, but the image shows just how cool Spider-Man can be in action as he strikes a pose as the spiders form around him. It would be great fun to see an artist, like Kambadais, who clearly understands and enjoys drawing the character, tackle a miniseries featuring Spiders-Man. His disgusting powers and body could make for a dark horror adventure or a lighter adventure where his abilities are shown in a dumber light. Marvel could really take the hero’s story in any direction.

Seeing Spiders-Man get the fan art treatment from Marvel Comics shows that despite playing a small role in the Spider-Verse, the hero’s unorthodox appearance, existence, and powers continue to make him a fan-favorite hero. Hopefully readers will see more of the character in the future, as the fan art proves readers deserve to see more gross. Spiderman in the future.


Next: Spider-Man 2099 Makes Huge Mistake In Centering Other Heroes

Source: Georges Kambadais – Twitter

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