Modern art styles – Utopic Studios http://utopicstudios.com/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 15:36:27 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://utopicstudios.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-3-120x120.png Modern art styles – Utopic Studios http://utopicstudios.com/ 32 32 How wine labels provide insight into what’s in the bottle https://utopicstudios.com/how-wine-labels-provide-insight-into-whats-in-the-bottle/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 14:33:52 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/how-wine-labels-provide-insight-into-whats-in-the-bottle/ Many people choose their wines based on the aesthetics of its label, opting for a preferred color palette, creative design, or beautiful works of art. Wine snobs may sniff out those who choose the bottle with the prettiest sticker instead of patiently researching the wine’s varietal, region and winemaker, but that’s not a bad strategy. […]]]>

Many people choose their wines based on the aesthetics of its label, opting for a preferred color palette, creative design, or beautiful works of art. Wine snobs may sniff out those who choose the bottle with the prettiest sticker instead of patiently researching the wine’s varietal, region and winemaker, but that’s not a bad strategy. Wine packaging has become quite sophisticated over the past few decades. When executed well, the label design can instantly tell the taste of a wine, like with this New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc.

Today’s self-service retail environment provides winemakers with all the incentives to ensure that their packaging accurately evokes the sensory profile of wine and appeals to the appropriate audience in terms of colors, fonts and style. ‘illustrations. Bright colors and modern art suggest a more fun fruity style. Parchment labels with engravings of vineyard scenes are associated with classics and signal traditional styles when they appear on European wines. These old-fashioned tasteful designs can be more ambiguous, however, as their gravity inspires widespread imitation.

The Prophecy wine line is international, with artful illustrations inspired by the symbolism and imagery of the tarot arcane. Everything about this bottle has been designed to evoke at first glance its crisp, lemony flavor profile. The clear glass suggests a refreshing and light white wine, while the palette of pale greens are visual metaphors for the dry, slightly grassy flavors of this cool, unoaked climate style. The image of the High Priestess from the tarot is meticulously detailed, showing her inner reflection in a way that conveys complexity and finesse. This is a lot that we can learn about a wine without doing homework or even reading the label.

$ 9.99, 12% ABV

PLCB Item # 1210

Sale price until 11/28 – regularly $ 11.99

Also available on:

Total Wine & More in Wilmington and Claymont – $ 9.99, totalwine.com

Joe Canal’s in Marlton – $ 9.99, marltonjoecanals.com

Canal’s at Mt. Ephraim – $ 9.99, mycanals.com


Source link

]]>
5 Ways 90s Cartoons Were The Best (& 5 Modern Cartoons Are) https://utopicstudios.com/5-ways-90s-cartoons-were-the-best-5-modern-cartoons-are/ Sun, 21 Nov 2021 17:11:17 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/5-ways-90s-cartoons-were-the-best-5-modern-cartoons-are/ Cartoon Network naturally left its mark on the kids of the 90s. After all, the channel was launched in the decade. And to date, many classic animated shows from the decade have left an impression on fans of all ages, even people who haven’t grown up in the decade. RELATED: Which Cartoon Network Hero Are […]]]>

Cartoon Network naturally left its mark on the kids of the 90s. After all, the channel was launched in the decade. And to date, many classic animated shows from the decade have left an impression on fans of all ages, even people who haven’t grown up in the decade.

RELATED: Which Cartoon Network Hero Are You Based On Your Zodiac Sign?

Likewise, it’s important to remember that not all of the cartoons enjoyed in the ’90s were necessarily made in the decade, but still had an impact on viewers. On the other hand, that doesn’t mean that modern cartoons don’t have their own merits.


ten The 90s: Thanks to Toonami, kids could watch cartoons

Sailor Moon and the Sailor Scouts posing in the Sailor Moon anime

One card that Cartoon Network has always had when compared to other American children’s networks is that they had a better track record of releasing foreign shows in the United States. Cartoon Network’s Toonami Block, for example, gave ’90s kids a chance to enjoy an anime that helped define the decade, like sailor moon and Dragon ball z, the former being used to launch the original TOM era.

In particular, most sailor moonAmerican fans had to content themselves with watching syndicated reruns during a slot machine in the graveyard. Cartoon Network not only gave fans a chance to enjoy the show after school, it even released the previously unlined third and fourth seasons. Cartoon Network also strongly embraced the alien nature of the series. During the Toonami Block, CN often aired the original Japanese endings of these shows, introducing American anime fans to classics such as Rurouni Kenshin‘s “Heart of the Sword.”

9 Modern cartoons: they know their audience

Gumball Sailor Moon

Thanks to the internet, it can be much easier to guess which trends are actually popular and what has followers. In the past, the network’s favorite shows were often considered popular, when it was often not at all.

To take sailor moon for example. In the early ’90s, it was mostly ignored in the West to the point where it’s surprising that a show referred to it, although it was ultimately seen as defining the decade. It’s so common these days for Cartoon Network shows to refer to it that the network posted a compilation video to their YouTube channel.

8 The 90s: what a cartoon! Show gave us a lot of classics

Super Girls DC Comics

The What a cartoon! The anthology show featured many classic shorts that would become classic shows for the network. The first three were Johnny Bravo, Dexter’s lab, and Cow & Chicken. Super girls, which was even a recurring short, took a little longer to become a full-fledged cartoon, but continued to dominate the network, even inspiring anime overseas.

RELATED: Cartoon Network: The 10 Smartest Cartoon Villains, Ranked

The series even had an effect on other networks. A short, Larry & Steve, would eventually be developed into Fox family guy. Nickelodeon would later produce a host of pilot anthology shows, dropping shows like My sponsors are magic and, ironically enough, Adventure time.

7 Modern cartoons: fans know what to expect from creator-focused content

HBO Max Jellystone Key Art

In the ’90s, the only chance fans knew about the creator of an animated series was usually because it was based on a comic book or a book.

In recent years, it has become more and more popular to know the creators of a show and wait for their style to show up in their works. For example, Jelly! could be based on classic Hanna-Barbera characters, but thanks to CH Greenblatt’s involvement, fans of Chowder and Harvey Becs became interested in the show.

6 The 90s: the network was already playing with adult animation

TV Space Ghost Coast To Coast Shatner Interview

Adult Swim would launch the following decade, and although Cartoon Network did perform with some adult series, the channel was primarily aimed at children, there were attempts to branch out into adult animation, such as Space Ghost from coast to coast and Canada.

There is also irony to family guy having its origins in a Cartoon Network short film from the 90s. The series was initially canceled after three seasons. Family Guy’s The popularity of reruns on Cartoon Network’s Adult Swim would spark the show’s revival, making the network a big part of the series’ history.

5 Modern cartoons: animation for adults has become much more refined

bitch pudding flipping a crowd

Adult Swim has seen its ups and downs over the years, but the fact that a lot of its most popular shows have been imported, from canceled Fox shows to cartoons, lends credence to the idea that their shows have been imported. originals had problems attracting an audience, at least in the early years.

RELATED: 5 Cartoon Characters on Rick Sanchez’s Level (& 5 Nowhere Near)

That said, in recent years, Cartoon Network’s adult animation has gotten more polished, with increasingly cult shows like Rick and morty Where robot chicken.

4 The 90s: foreign productions got a lot more promotion

The anime became a staple of the network’s programming during the ’90s, but it wasn’t the only time animation outside of the United States has been featured on the network, like that of Canada. Ed, Edd and Eddy and Russian-American Mike, Lu and Og.

One of the most striking examples is the Sesame Street-inspired Big bag, which featured animated segments from around the world, using studios in New York, Europe, and even Australia.

3 Modern cartoons: modern cartoons don’t have to be taken too seriously

Starfire, Raven, Robin, Beast Boy and Cyborg in Teen Titans Go!

’90s action cartoons often went too far to attract adult fans, especially shows based on well-known properties, to the point where showrunners would brag that their shows weren’t really for them. children. While this was by no means a bad thing, it often meant that darker shows would alienate the kids they were technically designed for.

These days, Cartoon Network shows can have fun on their own. An example is Teen Titans Go!, which does everything possible to appeal to children. Even the earliest Teen Titans cartoon knew there was a time and place to keep things light, often having episodes of breathing before darker ones.

2 The 90s: classic animation was presented

Tom and Jerry The Cat Concerto

During the 90s there was a greater impetus to present and showcase classic animation, such as the ToonHeads anthology series, which featured animated short films with a common theme.

The Boomerang block also worked like this, actually being a Saturday morning lineup of classic cartoons from the WB lineup.

1 Modern cartoons: animation has become much more experimental

Cartoon Network has featured a lot more experimental animation in recent years. The Amazing World of Gumball, for example, features characters in all kinds of animation styles, including 2D and 3D characters, as well as occasional puppets and live-action characters. In addition to its artistic style, the series has become famous for its unique stories, such as an episode devoted to background objects.

Crossover events have also become more prominent on the network, such as the infamous Pibby animated short film.

NEXT: DCEU: 5 Ways They Should Bring The Teen Titans To The Big Screen (& 5 They Shouldn’t)

Batman from The Dark Knight Returns and Red Rain split image


Next
Batman: 8 most powerful versions (and 7 less)


About the Author


Source link

]]>
9 ways to decorate with scalloped edges https://utopicstudios.com/9-ways-to-decorate-with-scalloped-edges/ Mon, 15 Nov 2021 18:08:23 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/9-ways-to-decorate-with-scalloped-edges/ In BOH‘s new On Trend series, we’re asking creators to share their current favorite finds. Sleek yet energetic, the scalloped edges and patterns have a moment, and it’s not hard to see why. Slightly wavy and very much like arches, scalloped patterns reached their peak during the art deco movement of the 1920s and currently […]]]>

In BOH‘s new On Trend series, we’re asking creators to share their current favorite finds.

Sleek yet energetic, the scalloped edges and patterns have a moment, and it’s not hard to see why. Slightly wavy and very much like arches, scalloped patterns reached their peak during the art deco movement of the 1920s and currently offer designers a touch of geometric drama that still reads in the traditional. “The scallops are timeless and classic”, says the designer Gray walker. “The scallops can be oversized for drama and on a smaller scale for a preppy and playful look. Repeating curves create movement [and] flirt with the room to which they are anchored.

Curious, we asked Walker and two other designers—Philippe mitchell and Jessica lagrange– tell us each one of their three favorite scalloped decorative finds and how to integrate them into a space.

Gray walkerCourtesy of Gray Walker

STEP GRAY | WALKER GRAY INTERIORS

Walker strives to create spaces that bridge the gap between the modern and the traditional. The Charlotte, NC-based designer draws on rich hues, classic patterns and unique antiques to forge warm yet glamorous interiors that exude sophistication.

Capri platform bed by Oomph
The scalloped base on the sides and foot creates a sense of rhythm, and the fabric options can give this bed a lot of personalities. “

Classic Curves: 9 Ways To Decorate With Scalloped Edges

Oomph Capri Platform Bed in Blossom Prisma and Cadet Welt Upholstery Courtesy of Oomph

Scalloped Arm Sconce by Coleen and Company
“This whimsical take on a simple desk lamp could make paying bills fun!” I would use this light flanking a headboard for a reading lamp.

Classic Curves: 9 Ways To Decorate With Scalloped Edges

Coleen and Company Scalloped Arm Sconces in Custom Pink with Gold Trim and Brass Hardware Courtesy of Coleen and Company

Lombard Oval Dining Table by Jan Showers
A graceful double pedestal dining table finished with a scalloped apron creates a fresh, classic vibe. The table can be mixed with many styles and periods of furniture. The scallop is as timeless as the Greek key! I would place it with anything from a Louis XVI style chair to a Lucite chair. So versatile!

Classic Curves: 9 Ways To Decorate With Scalloped Edges

The Lombard oval dining table by Jan ShowersCourtesy of Jan Showers

Classic Curves: 9 Ways To Decorate With Scalloped Edges

Philippe mitchellCourtesy of Philip Mitchell

PHILIP MITCHELL | DESIGNED BY PHILIP MITCHELL

Mitchell believes that every home should tell a unique story. Known for his nuanced approach to contemporary art and eye-catching colors, the Canadian designer has earned a reputation for creating interiors with a maximalist spirit that don’t skimp on comfort or roominess.

Betty Flush Mount by The Urban Electric Co.
“Lighting is one of the most important elements in any design, and one of the best ways to make a room feel elevated and layered is to mix unique lighting pieces together. The scallops of this fixture add such a sweet decoration.

Classic Curves: 9 Ways To Decorate With Scalloped Edges

Urban Electric Co. Betty Ceiling Light In Antique Brass Finish With Frosted Glass Courtesy of The Urban Electric Co.

Scalloped pillowcase by D. Porthault Paris
“Mixing and matching styles is one of our favorite ways to add pattern and depth and bring personality to a bedroom. I like to add a scallop detail like this to add interest and break up the straight lines of the rest of the bedding to create a beautifully bunk bed in a way that stays cohesive and serene.

Classic Curves: 9 Ways To Decorate With Scalloped Edges

Scalloped Pillowcase in White With Blue, by D. Porthault Paris Courtesy of D. Porthault Paris

Burst by Alexa Hampton for The Shade Store
“The whimsical scalloped pattern of this fabric shade brings a youthful touch to a window. “

Classic Curves: 9 Ways To Decorate With Scalloped Edges

Burst in Navy Blue by Alexa Hampton for The Shade StoreCourtesy of Alexa Hampton

Classic Curves: 9 Ways To Decorate With Scalloped Edges

Jessica lagrangeCourtesy of Jessica Lagrange

JESSICA LAGRANGE | INTERIORS JESSICA LAGRANGE

Adored for its keen sense of clean lines, rich earth tones and lavish finishes, Lagrange aims to create spaces that strike a balance between classic and contemporary. Using a wide range of aesthetic styles, the famous Chicago-based designer’s projects are marked by neutral palettes with strategic pops of color and simple patterns.

Ripple Swivel Stool by Cuff Studio
“We love Cuff Studio’s whimsical take on a classic Royere shape with their Ripple bar stool. This piece combines beauty and functionality with its padded seat and metal legs.

Classic Curves: 9 Ways To Decorate With Scalloped Edges

The Cuff Studio Ripple Swivel StoolCourtesy of Cuff Studio

Lombard Street Trim by Travers at Zimmer + Rohde
“Trims are a great way to introduce texture and color to a multitude of surfaces. This Travers specific trim is the perfect way to finish any room.

Classic Curves: 9 Ways To Decorate With Scalloped Edges

Lombard Street 195 by Travers Courtesy of Zimmer + Rohde

Bookbinding mat by Shiir
“Shiir’s binding mat is a favorite at JLI! The abstract use of scallops through marbling and swirling effect makes this rug easy to integrate into any interior.

Classic Curves: 9 Ways To Decorate With Scalloped Edges

The Bookbinder carpet in Laguna by ShiirCourtesy of Shiir

Reception photo: A room designed by Philip Mitchell | Annie schlechter


Source link

]]>
How Black Horror Became America’s Most Powerful Cinematic Genre https://utopicstudios.com/how-black-horror-became-americas-most-powerful-cinematic-genre/ Wed, 10 Nov 2021 14:01:26 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/how-black-horror-became-americas-most-powerful-cinematic-genre/ Likewise, the Conjuring Stories, which show black figures with the magic of transfiguring and empowering or annoying others, could serve as both charming tales and powerful allegories of how African belief systems older ones could, in theory, “defeat” the horror of American white supremacy. systems. Summoning men and women – people who knew ancient African […]]]>

Likewise, the Conjuring Stories, which show black figures with the magic of transfiguring and empowering or annoying others, could serve as both charming tales and powerful allegories of how African belief systems older ones could, in theory, “defeat” the horror of American white supremacy. systems. Summoning men and women – people who knew ancient African magic and could work that magic, or goopher, as it was sometimes called – could be slaves who practiced their spellbinding roots in secret, or freed or escaped people. who lived in isolated areas that offered them some protection from prying white plantation owners, or simply black Americans who had kept traditions alive to this day. The magical systems mentioned in much of this folklore, such as obeah, have their roots in African religious and spiritual practices. Their sorcery can metamorphose people and things, bring good or bad luck, heal or hurt – or even offer protection from danger. In such stories, you might meet the worrying, a witch woman who sheds her skin and flies in the night like a flaming ball to find the blood of children to drink, and who can only be stopped if you pour grains of rice. or salt in its path, or put salt or pepper on its molting skin, guaranteeing its annihilation at dawn. Likewise, one might encounter ghosts, spooky flaming skulls, duppies, lycanthropic werewolves and more. Basically, many of these stories are about survival. And because white slave owners rarely seemed to understand the language or practices of obeah, voodoo, and other African traditions, the conspiratorial men and women quickly became icons of subversion, black figures who had the ability to bring whites to their knees, like the Conjuring. wife Sapphira Wade in Gloria Naylor’s novel “Mama Day” (1988), whose legendary magic brings down a slave owner. If knowledge of these ancient arts represented a power that white settlers could not comprehend, then keeping these memories alive was one way to keep yourself alive: folklore as a fortress, memory as magic. The stories were talismanic, serving as warnings to live with caution, always aware that scary things – whether evil spirits or white slave owners – might have their eyes on you.

Of course, there was another reason to tell some of these stories: to invoke perhaps the most remarkable specter of all, freedom. Perhaps the best-known story in this African-American folk tradition concerns theft. “Once all Africans could fly like birds,” begins a version relayed by a man named Caesar Grant of Johns Island, SC, to author John Bennett, “but due to their many transgressions their wings were removed. ” All Africans, including the slaves brought to America, can still ascend into the sky, if they remember the magic words – words that white settlers find indecipherable. Pronounce them, as the slaves do in the story, and you will soar into the clouds, free from the tribulations of the earth. Here, hope, indeed, has become the thing with wings. Remember, the message seems to be, and you too can be freed.


Source link

]]>
Tradition meets evolution at the 74th Eureka Springs Festival – The Free Weekly https://utopicstudios.com/tradition-meets-evolution-at-the-74th-eureka-springs-festival-the-free-weekly/ Fri, 05 Nov 2021 14:56:52 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/tradition-meets-evolution-at-the-74th-eureka-springs-festival-the-free-weekly/ JOCELYN MURPHY jmurphy@nwadg.com By its simplest definition, “folk music” is just music for people. It’s music that tells the story of people’s lives, says Nancy Paddock, organizer of the Ozark Folk Festival. “It’s the music that begins in the living room and the front yard,” she muses, noting that genre, if that is still the […]]]>


JOCELYN MURPHY
jmurphy@nwadg.com

By its simplest definition, “folk music” is just music for people. It’s music that tells the story of people’s lives, says Nancy Paddock, organizer of the Ozark Folk Festival.

“It’s the music that begins in the living room and the front yard,” she muses, noting that genre, if that is still the most applicable word, “now has a fuller voice than it does.” probably never had it. It’s not as regional as it used to be, but I think it touches more on a common theme across the spectrum of folk music.

The 74th Incarnation of the Ozark Folk Festival, which runs November 11-14 at Eureka Springs, reflects this diversity with a lineup of both established and up-and-coming artists, local musicians steeped in Ozark culture and national names. influenced by other parts of the country and music that encompasses country, bluegrass, jazz, pop and even hip-hop and MCs.

“The festival started with the idea of ​​preserving traditional Ozark music and dance,” Paddock shares. “They were trying to preserve what happened 30 years ago. Now we watch [back]it’s the 1970s. So if we try to preserve traditions, we have more than decades of music to preserve, which greatly expands the spectrum of folk music.

“‘Folk’ is a word that means different things to different people, which works for us because it allows us to be broad and inclusive,” adds Dan “Danjo” Whitener, banjo player / lead singer. of the Gangstagrass festival. “This means that each of us can add our own folk music to the mix, and that’s fine. None of this is wrong.

The iconic Barefoot Ball of the Ozark Folk Festival was started by a Californian couple who won a two-week stay at the Basin Park Hotel in 1948, provided they remained barefoot throughout the stay. As they were good athletes for the challenge, a ball was thrown in their honor and it has been a tradition ever since. A shoe rack will be available for accompanying persons who wish to participate. (Courtesy photo / Eureka Springs Historical Museum)

“It can be hard to define,” adds his bandmate Rench (producer / guitarist / singer / beatmaker / creator), “but there is a way that music can come from the patronage of those with resources and serve the people. preferences of an elite, or come from the urge of people without resources to share and create together. What is music played by people for people, born out of this desire to sing and play together? I guess many kinds of music have come out of this, and that’s why “folk” can be a very broad term. At the end of the day, I just know I love people, so when they do things with the heart, it’s great.

“It’s organic, and it comes from the heart,” sounds MC / singer Dolio the Sleuth. “We can do it live, on command, in any space we’re in, and we don’t need anything but ourselves and certain people to experience it. “

Gangstagrass is an Emmy-nominated multiracial five-piece that explores the common ground of bluegrass, American roots music, and hip-hop as folk music – blending the rural and urban musical traditions of America.

“Where to start?” Danjo begins by considering the overlap between the bluegrass and hip-hop communities. “The structure of the music itself, the improvisation with exchanged pauses; the lyrical content of folk storytelling; the cultural and class similarity of performers and listeners; the relative young age of the two genders in the 20th century. Even the way genres were created, thanks to modern synthesis augmented with cutting edge technology.

“You can see both types of music as essentially a folk tradition, born out of common struggles and methods of making music together without resources,” Rench adds. He cites the history of the exploitation of the Appalachian region and the exploitation of the city labor markets that concentrated poverty in places like the Bronx in the 1970s, as unique examples with many things in common.

“The way people create and bond, build trust in their communities, share vocabularies and stories of struggle and rebellion – you’ll find it underneath it all,” Rench continues. “Music expresses these things because it was born in each case from the way people with no resources could come together and create shared music and improvise a musical conversation from the tools at their disposal.”

(Courtesy photo / Mélodie Yvonne) One More Thing With Gangstagrass: On the impact of regional musical heritage: Dolio: Being from the Gulf Coast, I definitely had a very different set of influences than, say, an MC from the northeast, from the west coast. , or even Atlanta, to be honest. Before the advent of the internet and media conglomerates consolidating huge swathes of the radio and television markets, I could travel from city to city and soak up the essence of a city or town. from what was on the radio, or in bars, clubs, and parties around the city blocks. I have the impression that this variety of regional flavors still exists in the underground scenes, but not so much in the general public. It’s really crazy that now I can hear people born and raised in Brooklyn sounding like they’re coming straight from the bayou. I guess it shouldn’t be that surprising, given that a lot of us migrate anyway. Rench: I hope we can continue to benefit from both – the wonderful dynamics of dialect, outlook and style of a region producing a new sound or subgenre, but also the possibility of it entering into a global exchange. where people around the world can be influenced by and participate in its evolution. It has lasted throughout the history of music. I’m not from the Appalachians, but the musical culture of the Appalachians has had a huge influence on me, which goes into my music in combination with other styles I’m more native to. Music is a natural cross-pollinator of culture. R-SON the Voice of Reason (MC / freestyler): I grew up in East Coast Boom Bap hip-hop, and it really shaped my style. Having different hip-hop styles is part of what makes the culture wider and more interesting, and it also challenges artists to develop their skills and work in other styles. Danjo: I think the whole idea of ​​regionalism can be overstated; when you look at how music was transmitted orally across America and the world before the invention of recorded music, you see that everyone was still learning other people’s songs. But the way I think of progressive music, you always have to start wherever you are, whatever you know, and then try to go in one direction – any direction – with it. BE Farrow (violin / singer): When I started playing bass as a kid, the people who opened the instrument to me were Bootsy Collins and New Orleans bassist Bill Johnson. The first funk bassline I learned was “Rubber Band Man”, and it showed me just how much funky groove can improve chops. Bill Johnson’s heyday was in the 1920s and it was difficult at the time to find out anything about him except that he was important around NOLA and then left music to create a shipping company – which blew me away. At the time, I didn’t think there was any other path for musicians than to be musicians, and her story opened my mind to other ways of making a career. MORE INFO – gangastagrass.com

Gangstagrass headlining show takes place on November 13 at The Aud, but the music will be playing all weekend at The Aud, Main Stage, Basin Park Bandshell and Basin Park Hotel for the legendary Barefoot Ball. “A selection of some of the best local musicians in the area” will be highlighted with free performances at the park, sharing Paddock, and each day will start with two local singers / songwriters as another way to spotlight local artists . Most of the national artists who perform in the evening are faces that Eureka Springs and Northwest Arkansas will remember from previous visits.

Although the area and Eureka Springs itself continue to change, Paddock says that between the Eureka Springs Historical Museum and events like the folk festival supporting local artists, “we are preserving the music that still thrives in our mountains. , our rivers and streams “.

“For decades it was a city that celebrated its heritage,” she says of the origins of the festival. “But today, it is a city that presents its heritage. So it went from something that is a city festival to something that is a city presenting a festival.

__

Faq

74th Annual Ozark Folk Festival

WHEN – November 11-14

O – Multiple sites in downtown Eureka Springs

COT – Performance varies; some free

INFO – 253-7333, facebook.com/OriginalOzarkFolkFestival

FYI – Proof of full covid-19 vaccination or a negative test within 72 hours will be required for some shows; temperatures will be checked at the door for some performances; masks will be compulsory inside. Visit the website for complete information.

__

for your information

Ozark Folk Festival

Calendar

November 11th

7 p.m. – Todd Snider, with opener Chucky Waggs, and Bear and Sofia, at The Aud. $ 40.

9:00 p.m. – Barefoot ball, with Arkansauce, at the Basin Park Hotel. $ 15.

12 november

6 p.m. – Hedges

8 p.m. – Jonathan Byrd and the Pickup Cowboys, with Melissa Carper and the Blue Hankies at 7 p.m., all at The Aud. Through donations of cash or non-perishable food to the local food bank and People Helping People.

November 13

8 p.m. – Still on the Hill, with Mighty Fine Time, at 7 p.m., on the main stage. $ 10.

7 p.m. – Gangstagrass, opening The Creek Rocks, at The Aud. $ 29.

14 november

7 p.m. – Sam Baker, with Tim Lorsh, on the main stage. $ 20.

Basin Springs Park

Sixteen local musicians and singer-songwriters will perform at the Bandshell from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. November 12 to 13 and from noon to 4 p.m. on November 14.


Source link

]]>
Eric Adams style: “Everything about you must be powerful” https://utopicstudios.com/eric-adams-style-everything-about-you-must-be-powerful/ Thu, 04 Nov 2021 00:39:22 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/eric-adams-style-everything-about-you-must-be-powerful/ Six years ago Eric Adams, then Brooklyn Borough President, was on stage at Medgar Evers College in Brooklyn and thundered his debut advice to future graduates. He urged them to “reach for the stars”. “You are lions,” he told them. They should always be like, “I am possible. But, he warned them, while you are […]]]>

Six years ago Eric Adams, then Brooklyn Borough President, was on stage at Medgar Evers College in Brooklyn and thundered his debut advice to future graduates.

He urged them to “reach for the stars”. “You are lions,” he told them. They should always be like, “I am possible.

But, he warned them, while you are doing all of this, remember, “When you play where the big boys and the big girls play, whatever you do, people are watching. “

“People watch your presentation before they take you seriously,” he said. “Everything about you must say power. “

On the first Tuesday in November, as he stepped onto a podium in Brooklyn to declare victory in the New York City Hall contest, becoming the second black mayor in city history and head of the electric playground, Mr. Adams explained exactly what that meant – as he’s been doing since he began his ascent to Gracie Mansion. His white shirt was so immaculate it practically shone; his collar open; his cufflinks closed.

“Whether he speaks or not, he always says something with his robe,” said George Arzt, a Democratic political consultant who was also Ed Koch’s press secretary. “And it’s, ‘I’m here. I am in charge. I mean business.

It is unusual for city politicians to engage in imaging issues. More often than not, they actively avoid personal discussions about dress, believing that this makes them frivolous or elitist. If they connect with the fashion world, it’s usually as an economic engine of the city or the clothing district: Michael Bloomberg hands Ralph Lauren a key to the city for investing millions in new stores ; Bill de Blasio welcomes the industry to Gracie Mansion ahead of Fashion Week. This is usually just business.

Not for Mr. Adams.

As he proved when he wore a bright red blazer at a fundraiser in the Hamptons in August, or displayed a photo of him in a new tower with the city’s skyscrapers sprawling at his feet, his aviators reflecting the beams and the glow of the building, he’s more than willing to use his clothes to stand out.

And as the 61-year-old assumes his role as the spirit – and face – of the city, a chaotic amalgamation of identities, politics, issues and possibilities, at a time when New York is still recovering from its doldrums. ‘a Covid-19 induces economic and spiritual nadir and after the social justice protests of 2020, he will become one of the most visible men in the metropolitan region. He can suffer this, or he can use it for his own ends.

“He manages to appeal to a lot of different people with a lot of different expectations,” said Nancy Deihl, chair of the art department at the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development at New York University. “He really dresses for that. It is a strategic deployment of the dress code which goes well beyond the policy of respectability in what one could call the policy of charisma.

He is, said Arzt, a mayor “for the visual age”.

There are still questions about Mr. Adams’ specific plans for New York and how he intends to carry them out, but in this area at least, he’s always been absolutely clear: what you mean. It has meaning and importance. And throughout his career, he’s crafted his own presentation to bring communities and interest groups together, to assert his place in the room – and beyond.

A little over ten years ago, when Mr. Adams was a senator for the state of Albany, he actually orchestrated a campaign featuring clothing.

The goal was not to run for office, but rather to get the men in his riding to stop wearing pants that seemed to slip over their underwear. Complete with posters and a video, it was called “Stop the Sag”.

“You can increase your level of respect if you lift your pants up,” Adams said in the video, wearing, according to the New York Times, “a gray suit, a green tie and a white pocket square” and framing the pants down. . in contrast, as participating in – and helping to perpetuate – a continuum of offensive racial stereotypes that stretched from Aunt Jemima to minstrel performers.

As to why it all mattered, he told the newspaper, “The first indicator that your child is having trouble is the dress code.”

In the end, he said, “It’s all in the clothes.

Since then, clothing has played a key role in much of his public storytelling, where he uses them as a kind of universal shorthand, a shared language that almost anyone can understand. Reciting his personal account, for example, he described bringing a garbage bag of clothes to school in case his family was evicted while he was away (clothes as a symbol of homelessness). Commemorating his 22-year career as a police officer in his Twitter biography, he wrote, “I wore a bulletproof vest to keep my neighbors safe” (clothing as a symbol of the positive side of law enforcement). Dramatizing a lesson in life, he told a seemingly borrowed story about confronting a rude neighbor who ignored him until he donned a hoodie (clothing as a symbol of racial prejudice and threat).

And celebrating his electoral victory, he declared: “Today, we take off the intramural jersey, and we put on only one jersey: Team New York” (clothing as a symbol of unity).

“He clearly knows a lot more about the subject than the average politician,” Alan Flusser, a New York tailor and author of “Clothes and the Man,” said of Mr. Adams. As to how he learned it, Mr Adams said his role model growing up was his uncle, Paul Watts, a tank top who always wore “a hat, a well-ironed suit and waxed shoes”, as well as his local pastors – although he took their lessons and made them entirely his own.

According to Rodneyse Bichotte Hermelyn, member of the state assembly and president of the Brooklyn Democratic Party, “Eric’s style has evolved along with his career” – from a police officer with a full-length uniform to chairman of the borough of Brooklyn with a quasi-uniform in the form of his post. official nylon jacket to today.

Now Ms Hermelyn said, “He projects New York City as the capital of the world through his wardrobe. But he also says he grew up on these streets.

Indeed, there are a number of stories built into Mr. Adams’ current choice shirts, suits and accessories.

Mr Adams had his ear pierced in July after winning the Democratic primary because he said he had met a young man during the campaign who expressed doubts about whether politicians were keeping their promises. When Mr Adams asked what he could do to prove him wrong, the young voter said he could agree to have his ear pierced if he wins – and then follow through.

“Day 1, keep my promises,” Mr. Adams said in a video of the experience. Now he wears a diamond, which serves as a nod to his engagement. But also an effective counterpoint to his perfectly fitted suits, an often carefully remodeled button to smooth the line, which both announces his physical form (which is famous in part by going vegan after a diabetes diagnosis) and places him squarely in. the tradition of Wall Street power brokers.

“He wears clothes in a modern way,” said Mr Flusser – close to the body, in the vein of Daniel Craig as James Bond, often without a tie – “but with classic flourishes of the past: collared shirts. cut, pouches. Details, said Flusser, “identified with the highfliers”.

Indeed, Mr. Adams is so detail-oriented in his dress that his decision to largely ditch the tie (except during debates, where he favored a four-handed knot with a central dimple) was clearly deliberate, another clue. visual that plugged him into the evolution of modern male dress code. Also noteworthy is the “energetic stone bracelet” he wears on his right wrist, made up of stones from Asia and Africa offered to him by his supporters, and his propensity to wear a white shirt.

“The white shirt is a really powerful image,” said Ms. Deihl of NYU. “It conveys crispness, crispness and motto.”

Together, she said, it all claims a visual genealogy that spans from Representative Adam Clayton Powell Jr. to President Barack Obama, whom black aviator Ray-Bans M. Adams has adopted.

“After seeing President Obama wearing a similar pair, I decided I needed them to look cool – Obama cool,” he told the New York Magazine strategist. (Other favorite brands include Florsheim Berkley loafers, Joseph Abboud chinos bought from Men’s Wearhouse, and Century 21 shirts.)

Since clothing is the unwritten, unwritten way of signaling to the world our belonging to a group, be it caste, class or profession, this particular collection of styles and names offers a mix of associations that allow to Mr. Adams to be a master of the universe, a new generation executive, a representative of the welfare contingent and the smart local on the street, all at the same time. It’s a balancing act that pushes the buttons that reflects both its politics and its chameleon ambitions. For himself and his new role.

“Part of the challenge here is perceptual – that New York is in decline, that it is not healthy, that it is not sure,” said Evan Thies, one of Mr. Adams’ senior advisers. . He noted that Mr. Adams “associates dress with confidence” – in himself and now, by transfer, in his city.

His work changes that impression. If he can do it not only through politics but (at least to begin with) through the force of the image – the “broken window” theory made personal, all the wrinkles ironed out – he may not only have won the election, Thies said, but “half the game”.



Source link

]]>
Why the secret symbols of magic and witchcraft fascinate us https://utopicstudios.com/why-the-secret-symbols-of-magic-and-witchcraft-fascinate-us/ Wed, 03 Nov 2021 00:03:23 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/why-the-secret-symbols-of-magic-and-witchcraft-fascinate-us/ The Tarot book features over 500 decks, spanning six centuries – and shows how different artists have made their own unique imprint on tarot. The Strength card, symbolizing bravery in the face of adversity, can usually depict a woman with a lion, but depending on the artist, that woman can be an Aztec warrior, an […]]]>

The Tarot book features over 500 decks, spanning six centuries – and shows how different artists have made their own unique imprint on tarot. The Strength card, symbolizing bravery in the face of adversity, can usually depict a woman with a lion, but depending on the artist, that woman can be an Aztec warrior, an Egyptian queen, or – in the 2015 Black Power Tarot – Tina Turner. She could stroke the lion, ride on its back, or hold its jaw open. It might not be a lion at all, but a grizzly bear or an alligator. Yet all of them will impart a sense of inner strength to overcome obstacles. “It’s really exciting to see how people interpreted it and then completely changed it, but there’s still that unifying archetype,” Hundley said.

The oldest known tarot cards, the Visconti-Sforza deck, date back to 15th century Italy. Created for aristocrats, the cards are intricate hand-painted works of art, featuring characters who will become key tarot archetypes. Tarot was originally a board game and it was not until the 18th century that cards became a tool for divination.

The most famous – and influential – tarot was created in 1909 when occultist Arthur Edward Waite commissioned artist Pamela Colman Smith to design a deck of cards. If you’ve only seen one tarot deck, it’s probably this one, the Rider-Waite-Smith (often referred to simply as the Rider-Waite) – still the most widely used in the world today. Both Colman and Waite were members of the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn secret society dedicated to the study of the occult (other members included Bram Stoker and WB Yeats). Their game of tarot reimagined and modernized, reinterpreting imagery to create a deck meant to reflect the reader who uses it. “Pictures are like doors that open unexpected chambers, or like a bend in the road with a broad perspective beyond,” Waite writes in the accompanying book, The Pictorial Key to Tarot.


Source link

]]>
Stuart Jeffries: Everything, All the Time, Everywhere – How We Became Post-Modern Criticism – An Entertaining Origin Story for Today’s World https://utopicstudios.com/stuart-jeffries-everything-all-the-time-everywhere-how-we-became-post-modern-criticism-an-entertaining-origin-story-for-todays-world/ Tue, 02 Nov 2021 01:08:02 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/stuart-jeffries-everything-all-the-time-everywhere-how-we-became-post-modern-criticism-an-entertaining-origin-story-for-todays-world/ He pulls from the same rich source a handsome thief and a chastity belt, places the thief in the chastity belt and lays him tenderly under the azalea, not neglecting to wind up the gold pocket watch so that its ticking finally awakens the now asleep. thief. “Then, continues Barthelme,” he borrows a pair of […]]]>

He pulls from the same rich source a handsome thief and a chastity belt, places the thief in the chastity belt and lays him tenderly under the azalea, not neglecting to wind up the gold pocket watch so that its ticking finally awakens the now asleep. thief. “Then, continues Barthelme,” he borrows a pair of seniors, Jacqueline and Jemima, and puts them to sleep near the azalea bush and the handsome and chaste thief. “

In her willingness to ‘take’ and ‘borrow’, the fictionalized author of Barthelme resembles Lance Taylor, better known as Afrika Bambaataa, founder of the Zulu Nation. Inspired by the 1964 film Zulu, Bambaataa started out as a DJ in New York’s Bronx, sampling “Caribbean soca, African music, and even German electronics” as he sought to give his neighborhood parties an eclectic edge. Bambaataa, according to Stuart Jeffries’ latest book, Everything, all the time, everywhere: how we became post-modern, was a purveyor of ‘postmodern pastiche’, producing new music from ‘trash cans, rubble, spray cans and old records’, or whatever was lying around, turning the old and the simple into something again, subversive, and originally non-original. In doing so, Bambaataa displayed an attitude towards music close to that which Robert Venturi, with his wife and partner Denise Scott Brown, brought to architecture: “a resource to plunder, a supermarket of styles” from which the couple returned. “With carts full of material to push back the modernist aesthetic”. The artist’s task, for Brown and Venturi, was to free art from the shackles of one mode, a philosophy fully exposed in their design for the Sainsbury Wing at the National Gallery in London.

“The world enters the work as it enters our ordinary lives, not as a worldview or system, but in a sharp particularity,” Barthelme wrote in Not-Knowing. It is with such particularity that Jeffries proceeds. Bambaataa and Venturi are unlikely partners; their lecture here is symptomatic of Allthe tinkering of a conventionally “high” and “low” culture that is itself postmodern. Each of Jeffries’ chapters selects three more examples from the diverse portfolio of postmodernism as the journalist and author concoct a sort of chronological origin story for the world today, resulting in juxtapositions as intriguing as Margaret. Thatcher and Sid Vicious, or Chris Kraus and Grand Theft Auto. It’s a story that begins in 1972, with the collapse of the Bretton Woods system. Called the ‘Nixon shock’, the political decisions taken by the US president eradicated the foundations of the Keynesian economy, precipitating the ‘globalized and hyperconnected world’ we know today and, in the privilege accorded to transnational capital flows. , says Jeffries, “destroy the social democratic egalitarianism of advanced industrial nations.”

In his previous book, Grand Hotel Abyss: the life of the Frankfurt school, Jeffries shone the spotlight on the human side of some of the 20e most obscure intellectuals of the century, and in doing so, made their concepts readable. Here he faces the opposite task: holding a mirror of a familiar world, All seeks to reveal hidden complexities. The economic paradigm inspired by Nixon is as integral to Jeffries’ postmodern analysis as that of Madonna. Like a virgin (1984) or that of Jeff Koons Rabbit (1986). Ours is a ‘schizophrenic’ era of one-click ordering and instant gratification, of Deliveroo drivers and zero hour contracts. It is also an era, following the work of Barthes, Foucault and Lyotard, of “language games”, where the fixed meaning is absent, and the so-called “meta-narratives” of history and science are refuted, supplanted on the contrary by a plurality. competing and equally valid claims. Another former president, Donald Trump, is not so much a cause of this postmodern dystopia as a symptom: who, in the form of 1980s New York, finds him a city as “auspicious” as that of Bret Easton Ellis. American psychopath (1991) to the violent sexual fantasies of its protagonist, Patrick Bateman. Moving from the real to the virtual, Jeffries demonstrates a natural ease that guarantees All is eminently readable, without evading the difficulties that are at the heart of its plot – whether it is about grappling with the complexity of Derrida’s “metaphysics of presence” or about recounting the debates between queer and feminist theories.

Barthelme, although absent from AllThe postmodernist account of, shows in the distancing effect of his vanity as a writer the irony which is, for Jeffries, the “inescapable rhetorical position” of the movement. But Not-Knowing concludes not without Barthelme first getting rid of this rhetoric, stepping out from behind the veil to extol the “ameliorative” powers of literature, his goal “at last to change the world”. Jeffries also concludes his mediation with an afterword, but titled “Ghost Modernism”, it traces in a different direction, away from the fiction of playful pluralism towards a real world defined by a shrinking state, increased corporate control and technological domination. voluntary. . “What was meant to be a casual antidote to modernist solemnity,” he writes of north London brutalist Highcroft Estate, “has turned sad, like a cake left in the rain.” It is in the sadness of our contemporary world, stripped of its “thoughtfulness and kindness”, that Jeffries finds the defining legacy of postmodernism. All is not a message of hope, only an answer to a question: how did we get there?

@danielbaksi



Source link

]]>
International Quilt Fest has a wide range of items including a $ 13,900 Bernina sewing machine https://utopicstudios.com/international-quilt-fest-has-a-wide-range-of-items-including-a-13900-bernina-sewing-machine/ Mon, 01 Nov 2021 03:21:35 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/international-quilt-fest-has-a-wide-range-of-items-including-a-13900-bernina-sewing-machine/ Quilting is more often associated with grandmothers than with gadgets. But for craft dwellers, the International Quilting Festival is an opportunity to examine the latest and greatest in sewing technology and techniques. After a year-long hiatus, the quilters returned this weekend to the George R. Brown Convention Center, where vendors had staged a stunning array […]]]>

Quilting is more often associated with grandmothers than with gadgets. But for craft dwellers, the International Quilting Festival is an opportunity to examine the latest and greatest in sewing technology and techniques.

After a year-long hiatus, the quilters returned this weekend to the George R. Brown Convention Center, where vendors had staged a stunning array of merchandise. Some, like Tina Brown, came to test out the latest sewing machines – like a $ 13,900 Bernina she compared to “the Cadillac of the quilting world.” Others, like Leticia Allred, have come for more modest pleasures.

Allred and her teenage daughter Brisa traveled to Houston from Lake City to marvel at the quilts on display, but diligently avoided stalls selling fabric for fear they would be tempted to buy some. Their little house is already full of bolts, Allred said.

“My husband knows that if the sewing machine is broken we will not be eating at the table this weekend,” she said on Sunday.

A teacher, Allred mainly makes quilts in the summer when she is not at school. She teaches her four daughters to sew because she wants them to be self-sufficient; know, she says, how to fix buttons and shorten hems.

“And that makes me hang up my phone,” replied Brisa, 17.

Nearby, Paul Ryan was sitting in a folding chair leaning against the wall outside the convention center. He was known to be one of the few men present. The reason for his presence was clear: he kept his wife’s four bags of folded squares of fabric – known to quilters as “big quarters” – in every color imaginable.

He said the transport “a drop in the bucket” compared to his wife’s fabric stash, tucked away in their North Carolina home.

Nashwa Aleem did not come to shop, but to be inspired by her own work. The Houstonian makes art quilts, creations she compares to “paintings made of thread.”

As she wandered the aisles, she took pictures on her smartphone. She stopped to take a photo of a quilt featuring the image of a horse, her body surrounded by rhinestones falling like rain.

“The appliqué work is impeccable,” she said. “That’s what I’m looking for: texture, color and movement.

Approaching a quilted black-and-white portrait of a man wearing a cowboy hat, Aleem cried out in amazement.

“Look at this detail! It’s thread painting at its best, like a sketch with a needle, ”she said.

She started quilting 11 years ago to raise money for her boys’ Montessori school. In the first year, she made three quilts and sold them for $ 2,000. His quilts have gotten more elaborate since.

Hundreds of quilts, in styles ranging from traditional pieces to modern threads, were on display in the cavernous convention center. The judges rigorously evaluated each submission and awarded a total of $ 52,750 in cash to entrants around the world. Best of the show went to Japanese seamstress Sachiko Chiba for her elaborate floral mandala design.

A few dozen historic quilts were also on display. Gloved sentries like Nikita Gallien stood ready to show curious festival-goers the detailed hand stitching that sets old quilts apart from machine-made new ones.

Gallien walked over to the oldest quilt – a pink and blue star pattern from the early 1800s – and slipped under the rope protecting it from visitors. With a white-gloved hand, she carefully pulled the corner to reveal the delicate stitching on the back of the quilt. As a new quilter, she says she is still learning all of the elements that go into making quilts.

“I learned not to call them blankets,” she said.

nora.mishanec@chron.com


Source link

]]>
Fitness, fashion and community converge at performance clothing retailer Carbon38 https://utopicstudios.com/fitness-fashion-and-community-converge-at-performance-clothing-retailer-carbon38/ Sat, 30 Oct 2021 19:37:12 +0000 https://utopicstudios.com/fitness-fashion-and-community-converge-at-performance-clothing-retailer-carbon38/ Carbon38 pioneered the multi-brand luxury sports retail concept. Photo courtesy of Carbon38 In the first episode of the new Apple TV show Physical, with Rose Byrne, it’s evident that fashion and workout wear have converged since the fitness boom of the 1980s. Fast forward to today, when the wearing of athleisure styles has crept into […]]]>

In the first episode of the new Apple TV show Physical, with Rose Byrne, it’s evident that fashion and workout wear have converged since the fitness boom of the 1980s. Fast forward to today, when the wearing of athleisure styles has crept into some outfits. corporate work. No one was better positioned to capitalize on this emerging trend of blurring the lines between street wear and athletic wear than Carbon38 co-founder Katie Warner Johnson. The CEO combined her Harvard degree and fitness trainer skills to launch the first multi-brand luxury sports retailer with a mission to boost other female-led brands along the way.

After earning a bachelor’s degree in art history and architecture, Warner Johnson deferred a job offer from Deutsche Bank to pursue his other passion, ballet. This dream was blocked due to several injuries, but rather than fall back on finance; she became a coveted fitness trainer in Los Angeles. “I was a fitness instructor so I lived in spandex,” says Warner Johnson of the birth of the brand.

“I got to know some cool, up-and-coming brands, the majority of which were led by women. I found that these brands wanted to tackle the major players in the sportswear space, but rather than it. to do so, I thought about assembling the micro-players and crowdsourcing our way to success. ” An invitation to the 2012 Women 2.0 Startup Conference weekend in San Francisco helped cement the idea.

The name was born out of the CEO’s passion for the periodic table, and in 2014 the brand was launched with five brands. “Carbon is one of the most abundant elements in our body, and that seemed compelling to me for the business I was starting to create,” she explains. They have worked with over 260 brands to date, 75% of which are led or founded by women. “It is important for me to support my fellow leaders – Carbon38 exists because of them,” says Warner Johnson.

The site features Adidas by Stella McCartney, LoveShackFancy, Balmain, Reebok X Victoria Beckham and Sweaty Betty, among others. The looks promote a style that mixes the DNA of sportswear with trendy ready-to-wear silhouettes, a stimulating look for modern women.

The fitness pro tapped into her financial acumen from her college background, growing the business from $ 0 to over $ 50 million, raising successful fundraising rounds and hiring the right industry leaders. to support the vision.

The world of fitness was a community long before social media and the internet buzzed with them. It turned out to be the retailer’s first marketing vehicle, with Warner Johnson being the brand’s first ambassador. “I was our first ambassador, wearing the latest styles on Carbon38 for my morning fitness classes. By the time I got home from the studio, we had hit our daily sales target.” She credits the ambassadors for the founding and success of Carbon38.

The company has a network of thousands of fitness instructors in 23 countries serving as “brand evangelists,” as it puts it. “Consumers today can spot a fake endorsement at a glance. When there is a real connection between the brand and the partner, consumers feel it, believe it and buy into it. Cultivating an authentic network of ambassadors has been our mission at Carbon38. ”

Recently, the brand launched the “At Our Core” campaign which highlights the roles and social contributions of female ambassadors around the world. “These women are pillars of their community and the foundation of our business,” she explains.

Like any start-up, Carbon38 was not without a learning curve, especially the odd luck of their community success. “Knowing what I know now, I wouldn’t have taken any risks or supported some of our craziest and most important victories,” she reveals. “That said, in the past year alone Carbon38 has experienced some of its greatest ups and downs. My biggest learning has been ‘you are never in control’, a terrifying and liberating achievement,” she continues of critical business lessons.

As a fitness brand with many instructor ambassadors, they were ready at the onset of the pandemic to reach out to their community, offering classes to help keep some aspect of normal life going. “At the start of the lockdown, we implemented ‘Work (out) From Home’ – a 3 times a day fitness class hosted on our Instagram with a wide range of instructors from our community of ambassadors. ”

The platform brought together customers, brands, suppliers, investors, teams and ambassadors during this difficult time. “We always offer live classes on weekends on our Instagram. The possibilities to connect with our wider community extend far beyond leggings.”

For those on the east and west coasts looking for an IRL Carbon38 experience, the brand currently has two physical locations, Palisades Park and Bridgehampton. Current investments are aimed not only at transporting over 70% of female-led brands, but also investing in investors and incubators acting both for those who otherwise might never receive capital and exposure for succeed on a large scale. Collaboration is also at the heart of the brand, having forged an exclusive tennis-centric collection between Venus Williams and EleVen.

In 2015, the brand added its own line of exclusive training clothing to Carbon38. They are taking steps towards sustainability by using two fabrics in the core products, Cloud Compression and Diamond, made from recycled water bottles. In addition, 100% of branded polyethylene bags are made from recycled plastic.

The road to sustainability is a journey much like building a brand. Small steps and actions turn into bigger ideas and results. Warner Johnson is grateful for the opportunity, regardless of the self-creation and wisdom gained along the way.

“Building something from scratch at my kitchen table to spend the last 20 months at that table preparing the business for a new era and its next decade of success has been a gift,” she reflects, adding: “Back to learning that you are never in control. I plan to listen more carefully to our customers, suppliers and teammates because the answer is always in the room. “


Source link

]]>